Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for a 150mm fork for my Pivot Mach 5. I heard several years ago that the Fox TALAS forks had slightly less travel than their counterparts. I.e. a TALAS 150 would not be quite as plush as a Fox Float 150. Anyone know if that's true? I'm looking at the new ones with the FIT damper, if that matters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,674 Posts
Floats are going to be a bit plusher than Talas'. The Talas model uses more seals to accomplish the travel adjust which creates stiction. It is just a compromise with the design. That said, the difference between the two has closed over the years which I believe is due to the fact that less seals are now being used to accomplish the travel adjust. Only way to find out if the compromise is acceptable to you is to ride both.

For what its worth, I ride a talas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
761 Posts
I have had several of both and find the TALAS springs to be more linear than the floats, I ended up doing the air chamber mod on my float to improve the feel of it .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
LDH said:
I have had several of both and find the TALAS springs to be more linear than the floats
So the TALAS would be better over smaller stuff like roots? That would be a good thing for me. I like good small bump compliance. I ride in Florida and have lots of small roots. Then I do lots of trips up to Pisgah and north Georgia.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Linear = not good (not progressive, it dives through travel very easily)
A Talas 150 2009 was the last Talas for me, I even ordered a Float cartridge, but finally decided to sell the whole bike anyway..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
midas said:
Linear = not good (not progressive, it dives through travel very easily)
Couldn't you adjust the compression damping to take care of this? I run the compression damping very low on my other RLC fork.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,029 Posts
farmertan said:
So the TALAS would be better over smaller stuff like roots? That would be a good thing for me. I like good small bump compliance. I ride in Florida and have lots of small roots. Then I do lots of trips up to Pisgah and north Georgia.
All else being equal, a linear (or falling rate in a rear suspension design) will be worse on small initial impacts. This is because you will need to use more spring (air pressure) to to reach the same spring force at bottom out to prevent bottoming and overtravel. The falling rate was tried with frame design about 10 years ago. The idea was better/firmer pedaling 'platform' (less bob or suspension movement) due to the higher initial rate. Unfortunatley what resulted was bikes that were harsh over small impacts, and bottomed excessively over any larger impacts. Increasing damping to prevent bottom out results in worse bump absorption, Decreasing damping does the opposite. Not surprising, falling rate designs pretty much no longer exist.

That being said, ALL air springs are progressive to some extent, it just happens that the TravelAdjustLinearAirSpring is more linear than some designs.

Anytime you add more complexity(travel adjust, lockout, etc) you will have a higher probability of 'issues'. Adding more seals, o-rings, etc (air spring) will add to the posibility of additional friction as well as more 'wear parts'.

The talas has both of these going on, so though it is a great fork that offers some very nice features, it will always have more points of possible failure and will likely take more 'looking after' than a more simple design.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,029 Posts
Really it is a description of everything....including ALL bike suspension.

Unfortunatley, is seems like a lot of people who buy all the bells and whistles are also the same people who either do not, or dont know they should be, performing the kind of regular service that said bells and whistles demand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
I run an '09 Talas 150 RLC (tapered steerer) on my Tracer VP and find it to be an excellent fork. At 25% sag, it is very compliant over small bumps / rocks / roots without too much dive. I get full travel that feels very linear, ramping up in the last inch of travel, right where you want it to ramp up. I actually like this fork better than the Float 140 RLC on my '08 Stumpjumper. This fork works quite well with my Push'd 2010 RP23 on my Tracer VP, which I believe is a falling rate rear suspension. I did get the Big Hit kit on the shock to help with the bottoming issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
669 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,837 Posts
While they can improve the seals in a Talas, or eliminate some of them, it will always have more than the Float. Also, the Float can be tuned to adjust the progression of the air spring. To make it more progressive, add Float fluid (80w gear oil) to the air chamber; a few ml makes a noticable difference so go slow. If you want to make it feel more linear, remove 10mm off the air spring shaft (http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=468341). You can always make up the difference with Float fluid if you don't like it, or took too much off (1ml of oil per mm removed).

Unless you really need the on the fly travel adjust, the Float is the better fork. It's lighter, more tunable, more durable, and requires less maintenance.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top