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Would you please try it?

And then let us know. It would be revolutionary if it really works.

The only method I have ever found is to keep the brakes/calipers clean with denatured alcohol and change them when they get thin on pad thickness.

My current setup is the new Saint 810 levers, hoses, calipers, and pads with Avid G3 rotors - fairly quiet. On a DH bike, too.
 

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The problem I see is that, at least by my own reckoning, the majority of problems with noise/vibration on disc brakes is due to poor installation. Caliper instal and position/alignment is also vital for proper brake performance, but for some reason people seem to shy away from it, preferring to look for 'better' pads, larger/smaller rotors, different brakes or even, as we have here, some kind of magic spray.

The spray may well do what it claims to do, but a properly installed and properly functioning brake really shouldn't make the noises that the spray works to eliminate. There may well be a place for the SwissStop spray, particularly for riders who can't avoid riding in the wet - when most brakes tend to give the odd squeak before the brake heats up - but I wonder how many people will use it as a plaster over the faults in their equipment or set-up.
 

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I agree....

I find that I am always messing (technical term) with caliper alignment, piston push unevenness, centered pistons, etc. These will all make a difference in how the brakes perform as well as how they sound.

I also find that many/most riders never touch their bikes until something goes wrong or it becomes unbearable to ride; e.g., noise, vibration, or it just stops.

As a former pilot with many hours in the air in all kinds of aircraft, the above approach is not practical, so I have carried over the same pre- and post-flight methods of inspection to biking. On a DH bike this is really valuable as the machine takes a beating over the course of a hard day of riding and there is never a time on a post ride inspection that I don't find something that needs attention; from the obvious such as a loose spoke, loose bolt, etc., to the more subtle things like a tire tear, bent chain plate or sprocket/cassette tooth.

The old saying; "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure"works well in this two-wheeled environment. The other old saying may also be applicable here, too; particularly as it relates to bike maintenance; "there are old pilots and there are bold pilots, but there are no old, bold pilots." :D
 

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ups and downs
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It's interesting that auto disc brakes sometimes use an anti squeal shim on the back of the pads to damp the vibration against the piston. Often it's a simple high temp paper shim glued to the back of the pad.

For the life of me I can't think of the name of the paper, but it was a stiff dark blue-ish gray and was flame and fluid resistant and was very similar to a very thin paper gasket material my grandfather used to use to make gaskets for hydraulic pumps.
 

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The MTB Lab
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They have used the same stuff on railroad brakes, that is where the technology came from originally. I have a set of the SwissStop pads that have been pre-impregnated with the Silencer so I will try them out in the snow (not much rain currently). Until I try it it is unknown if it will help?
 

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ballbuster
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I don't agree

SteveUK said:
The problem I see is that, at least by my own reckoning, the majority of problems with noise/vibration on disc brakes is due to poor installation. Caliper instal and position/alignment is also vital for proper brake performance, but for some reason people seem to shy away from it, preferring to look for 'better' pads, larger/smaller rotors, different brakes or even, as we have here, some kind of magic spray.

The spray may well do what it claims to do, but a properly installed and properly functioning brake really shouldn't make the noises that the spray works to eliminate. There may well be a place for the SwissStop spray, particularly for riders who can't avoid riding in the wet - when most brakes tend to give the odd squeak before the brake heats up - but I wonder how many people will use it as a plaster over the faults in their equipment or set-up.
I installed some Hope Minis with 185mm bubble rotors on my Monocog29er, and it howeled like crazy. It howelled so badly, I could feel it through the pedals and it tickled my feet. Alignment was dead on ballz perfect, and I even let the pads bed in a bit. I also messed with alignment and centering.

I put those same exact brakes back on my stumpjumper, and they were dead quiet. I tried stock pads and EBC Green pads, and they both had this problem.

It came down to how the brakes rung against the frame. The Monocog steel double diamond frame was perfectly tuned to the brakes, whereas the stumpjumper wasn't.

I put my Mono Minis with 160mm non-floating rotors, and it was quiet.
I'm not sure this spray would make any difference.

It is fair to say that some noise can be remedied with proper setup and adjustment, but not all.
 

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"It is fair to say that some noise can be remedied with proper setup and adjustment, but not all."

I thought I had impressed that with my post. You'll notice that I use terms such as "the majority of problems" and "properly functioning brake really shouldn't make the noises", rather than, for example, insisting that every single noise problem is caused by improper set-up and that it is impossible for a correctly installed brake to make unwanted noise.

My concern is that people will turn to the spray to 'solve' their brake noise, which will typically stem from poor alignment, and basically just end up with quiet yet under-performing brakes. The term "papering over the cracks" is one that springs to mind.
 
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