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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have some private stock I have built trails on following old gas line right of ways and logging skid roads, but there are a few areas that have ponds above them from mining that keep sections really wet all year. Its not like they drain, more like a seep and covers anywhere from a few feet to several yards. There is no way to really channel it, so ditching is out and its a little long to bridge it. I put a few pallets down in one section and they worked well, but for how long. Does anyone else have any ideas on what to do? Grading won't help either as some are on steep grades already.
 

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Dirt Monkey
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First look for areas to reroute the trail which don't have these problems or have much less of a problem. This will be the least amount of work in the long run.

The second least amount of work is bridging the wet areas with an elevated structure or using some type of paving stone and gravel to harden the trail surface.

The most difficult way to solve the problem is by diverting the groundwater with gravel filled ditches and/or drainage tile. We have tried this method with limited success and I would really only recommend it as a last resort due to the time, material, and physical investment necessary. In my experience, groundwater seeps across trails are one of the hardest problems to correct and are best avoided.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks both. That was a great link. I had thought about putting down logs so I guess I will give that a try. No way to route around, looked at that first and did where I could, but some places are straight down. Pavers would be great but I would need a lot and would run into $$$$
 

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Dirt Monkey
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If you have slow drying soils on the hillside, don't lay logs directly on the soil to cross groundwater seeps. Make sure they are somehow supported off of the ground like the corduroy feature in the Wetlands Trail Design and Construction publication. We found that laying logs perpendicular to the trail directly on the ground effectively creates a dam, diverts water to the ends of the feature, and allow the wet spot to progress down the length of trail over time.
 
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