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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Who is the go to for suspension tuning these days? Prefer to stay within the USA to avoid international shipping and possible delays. I've been happy with PUSH for tuning my Fox 36 forks. Really looking for a top shelf tuner that knows how to tune a DPX2 shock to work with a 230lb rider.
 

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Corey at Stillwell here in Phoenix is the man. I take my Fox to him for yearly service and it always looks and rides amazing when I get it back.

 

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Who is the go to for suspension tuning these days? Prefer to stay within the USA to avoid international shipping and possible delays. I've been happy with PUSH for tuning my Fox 36 forks. Really looking for a top shelf tuner that knows how to tune a DPX2 shock to work with a 230lb rider.
I think your only true options for tuning the dpx2 are avalanche and maybe the shock howse. Vorsprung has apparently decided the design of the shock won't let them achieve what they desire. Avalanche goes into more detail as to what they're actually doing to the shock and the shock howse when I searched a while back out of curiosity when I saw one of their shocks on a YouTube video somewhere basically had zero info and their site still doesn't go into any details of if it's just a re shim or a modification to the shock (what's actually is the smack stack?).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I think your only true options for tuning the dpx2 are avalanche and maybe the shock howse. Vorsprung has apparently decided the design of the shock won't let them achieve what they desire. Avalanche goes into more detail as to what they're actually doing to the shock and the shock howse when I searched a while back out of curiosity when I saw one of their shocks on a YouTube video somewhere basically had zero info and their site still doesn't go into any details of if it's just a re shim or a modification to the shock (what's actually is the smack stack?).
I'd like to know more too. Defiantly light on details other than saying the stack is machined locally.

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I had Mike at the Shock Howse tune my Ohlins coil and he's great to work with. If you're wondering about what he does for DPX2 just give him a call and I'm sure he will explain it for you. I briefly asked him about the smack stack a few months ago and believe he does custom valving and shim stack but don't quote me on it.
 

· Elitest thrill junkie
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DPX2 has a very limiting design that makes it difficult for any tuner to really get high performance out of it. You are going to hear about this if you want Avalanche to work on it.


In short, there are significant limitations on what you can get out of it, as compared to some other platforms.
 

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I think your only true options for tuning the dpx2 are avalanche and maybe the shock howse. Vorsprung has apparently decided the design of the shock won't let them achieve what they desire. Avalanche goes into more detail as to what they're actually doing to the shock and the shock howse when I searched a while back out of curiosity when I saw one of their shocks on a YouTube video somewhere basically had zero info and their site still doesn't go into any details of if it's just a re shim or a modification to the shock (what's actually is the smack stack?).
My feeling is Steve was looking to expand (the incredible effort) that is the Tractive rear shock tuning platform. But the DPX2 has just got too much weirdness going on to work like that. Because the DPX2's compression circuits influence rebound it needs to be individually tuned.

It's too needy to work in a prescribed tuning scheme. I really think Fox made the right call by ditching that shock design. It had nothing good to offer. I shudder when I see high dollar bike builds using them.
 

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For what it's worth, I upgraded my 2020 dpx2 factory (late 2019 build date), to the new 20'-21' my base valve (that was announced and released along side the new switchblade). I also changed the damping from a comp medium and digressive rebound medium to CEC 001 and RLA 019. These are both pretty light shim stacks with no ring shim for pre-load. Obviously, the specific shim stacks are frame/leverage rate dependent... but the improvement to the dpx2 with the new base valve and the lighter valving was a huge improvement.

As Dougal mentioned... the dpx2 has some of the most insane cross talk that I've ever experienced on a suspension product before. I have plenty of experience dealing with cross talk, but I've never experienced it being as dramatic as it was on the 2019 spec dpx2 and as un-predictable. It was seemingly impossible to find a point where I had a good rebound and compression setting at the same time, or rebound setting/valving that felt properly controlled through the return stroke.

I digress... this wasn't the cheapest thing in the world because the base valve and parts were around 125 if i recall correctly. The take away here is that it's not all that cost effective to tune this shock, and as Dougal mentioned, there are some gotcha's to this design that will never fully go away... more or less bandaids to fix the way it can be tuned on certain frame types. Avalanche is always a good option for aging suspension products that need a rebuild as you can get it rebuilt and tuned for not much more then the cost of a rebuild. That may be the best option, unless you are willing to take a stab at tuning it yourself based on the fox parts list.

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the info guys. Sounds like it doesn't make sense to mess around with the DPX2. I'll ride it till its ready for a rebuild and see what the aftermarket has available at that time.
 

· always licking the glass
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Thanks for the info guys. Sounds like it doesn't make sense to mess around with the DPX2. I'll ride it till its ready for a rebuild and see what the aftermarket has available at that time.
Ready to ride and serviced: usually about 250-300 for used sale.

Needs to be serviced to be ridable: significantly less than listed above.
 
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