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Discussion Starter #1
I was wonder what you folks think the advantages are of have a ridged fork on an SS bike? What are the advantages of suspension? Which is best? I currently have a Rock Shox Duke U-Turn on my SS and was wondering how the performance would change if I went to a ridged fork.
 

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I like the simplicity and purity of a rigid fork. They are simpler to maintain, lighter (especially compared to the Duke), and track better on ice. I just run my front tire low.
 

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Run a big tire, and ditch the oil/air/spring/flex/maintenance hassles of suspension. You'll get beaten up more on a rigid fork, but your bike will be lighter and utterly worry-free. Plus, IMHO, a nice smooth steel rigid fork looks much better than the bulky complexity of a suspension unit.
 

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..If... your hands, arms and shoulders are good enough to take the extra shocks of a non - suspended front fork, then definitely give it a go.

It makes for a more accurate steering, and a much lighter and maintenance - free front end.


It can also be waaaay cheaper.


R.
 

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Best o' both worlds

I like a rigid fork for going over log piles and slower technical work. But for all day, high speed epics I like my 5" Fox Vanilla w/lockout.

So here's what I did. Since I already had a suspension fork (as you do), I bought a rigid KM fork (which has the same A-to-C dimension as my Fox) and a second headset crown race. Installed the 2nd crown race and cut the steerer to the same length as my existing fork, and wah-la. Now I can switch forks in less than 15 minutes (disc brake takes the longest, and even that ain't long) and ride whichever fork suits the type of riding I'll be doing that day.

It's two, |snap| two, |snap| two bikes in one.

--Sparty
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Interesting

I like your idea, an additional brake caliper on the extra fork would make switching even easier. Right now because of budget restraints I'll probably stick with the Duke. I find the with it cranked down to its minimum travel the bob is tolarable.

As far a weight goes, I ride a 32lbs+ trail bike so the SS even though its not light seems that way.

Sparticus said:
I like a rigid fork for going over log piles and slower technical work. But for all day, high speed epics I like my 5" Fox Vanilla w/lockout.

So here's what I did. Since I already had a suspension fork (as you do), I bought a rigid KM fork (which has the same A-to-C dimension as my Fox) and a second headset crown race. Installed the 2nd crown race and cut the steerer to the same length as my existing fork, and wah-la. Now I can switch forks in less than 15 minutes (disc brake takes the longest, and even that ain't long) and ride whichever fork suits the type of riding I'll be doing that day.

It's two, |snap| two, |snap| two bikes in one.

--Sparty
 
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