Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey I'm curious. Which is the better every day commuter from Surly? Thier Long Haul Trucker or thier Cross Check? They both look like really good commuters but the only thing I have a problem with is the fact the LHT only comes with 26 inch wheels when you get into the sizes I need. That's easily fixed but fairly annoying :(
 

Attachments

·
namagomi
Joined
·
2,884 Posts
The LHT is a far better choice for everyday commuting, it is over-built to last.

What is wrong with 26" not the end of the world... in fact it is a better choice for those small frames
 

·
weirdo
Joined
·
6,223 Posts
Better is relative. A lot of people very happily commute on each of those models. Both are about the same price, have very similar components and a lot of built in versatility. Like you noted, the CC has 700 wheels, I`d guess it`s slightly lighter and probably not quite so rough and tough (though certainly not whimpy). The LHT is a true tank, but if you look at the whole bike after adding fenders, racks, lights, etc the weight and handling difference is going to be a fairly small when all is said and done. Which one makes you drool? That`s the one to get.

electrik said:
What is wrong with 26" not the end of the world... in fact it is a better choice for those small frames
Yeah. When the OP says "that`s easilly fixed", it sounds like a plan to swap wheel sizes. Probably possible, but it would require some surgery with a torch and a new paint job in addition to the minor geometry changes. Doesn`t sound worth it to me, but I prefer 26 inch wheels anyway.
 

·
Ovaries on the Outside
Joined
·
4,425 Posts
Overbuilt to last? Meh. Both bikes are the same in terms of quality. LHT probably has a few more eyelets, the CC is going to have a bit sharper handling.

You could easily bump up to a 650b LHT with a set of brakes with a lot of vertical adjustment. 700c wheels would probably fit too, but you'd end up limiting the size of tire and fenders you could fit under the brake line.
 

·
The Brutally Handsome
Joined
·
1,257 Posts
I have owned and commuted on both and while they may seem similar they are actually distinctly different bikes. In my experience, the LHT is better bicycle both in general and for commuting for the following reasons:

The LHT is designed to carry weight and has thicker, stiffer tubes and lower bottom bracket that provide stability with only a slight sacrifice in weight. On the other hand, the CC felt unstable when loaded, especially in the front end.

The LHT has more relaxed geometry that is better for commuting but is still quick and responsive enough to make it fun to ride. The CC has awkward geometry that felt uncomfortable with a longer effective top-tube than the same size LHT.

The LHT comes with lots of useful brazes and has nice touches such as fancy fork and rear dropouts and extra spoke holders, while the CC doesn't even have a cable stop for the rear brake! It also comes with nicer components than a CC, with XT hubs and rear derailleur.

While I'll allow the CC is a nice bike, the only thing that it has on the LHT is the horizontal dropouts which allow single or fixed gear riding. However, this is only an advantage if you always ride SS/FG, as changing back and forth is too time consuming to be done on a regular basis.

I have since sold both bikes and am now on my third Surly machine, a Big Dummy. If your interested, I could give you another 20 reasons why a BD is better than a CC or an LHT!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
747 Posts
I ride a CC fixed and LHT geared (w/ 26x2.0 big apples). They are set up pretty differently, but the LHT is better with a load (gearing aside) and is my only choice for kid-hauling. I could load the CC like I do the LHT (front and rear) but it would be more of an endurance thing than enjoyable, and I'd want to gear it differently too.
 

·
No-Brakes Cougar
Joined
·
1,143 Posts
There are a wider (figuratively and literally) variety of tires available in the 26" size, something to consider as well.
 

·
Bedwards Of The West
Joined
·
5,451 Posts
If I was in the market for one of those two bikes, I'd get the Kona Jake The Snake. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts
LHT commuter here boss.

Love it. The geometry is perfect for a commute. As mentioned above, it's a bike designed to carry stuff. Why? Because it's got touring geometry and specs: low bottom bracket; longer chain stays; not exactly the same gearing as a CC. Personally, I don't think you can go wrong with either, but I choose the LHT.
 

·
Just Ride!
Joined
·
806 Posts
I like mine. It's a pretty darn stable bike compared to my last cyclocross commuter especially when it's loaded. If not for commuting I can slap some fat tires( Continental Vapors rear and some 2.1 Kendas front) and do some offroad rides. The best part for me is I don't need to get off the saddle when stopped at red light because of the low bottom bracket(one of the reason why it's such a stable bike).:thumbsup:

 

·
LCI #1853
Joined
·
328 Posts
I ride a Cross-Check as my main commuter and putting-around-town bike. I added a Delta rear rack to hold panniers, rack trunk, and whatever else, a Brooks saddle, and swapped the knobby 'cross tires for a pair of slick Continental Gatorskins. It's been a good workhorse for the past two years.

Depending how much of a load you're going to carry, a Cross-Check may not be your ideal. The Cross-Check doesn't have provisions for mounting a front rack and panniers; the LHT does. The Cross-Check is a road-bike/'cross bike; the LHT is optimized more for loaded touring and hauling stuff. I ride a 56 cm bike, so an LHT in my size would still have 700C wheels, but that may be an issue for others. If picking either of the two Surlys strictly for commuting & utility riding, the LHT has an avantage in that you can easily fit front racks and better distribute heavy loads.
 

·
LCI #1853
Joined
·
328 Posts
I've used both, both both commuting, touring, and utility riding. And I've liked both.

The LHT gets the nod on an all-around commuter and utility bike, simply because it's built to go the distance hauling the freight. The Cross-Check feels a little peppier, but doesn't have the braze-ons to mount front racks or panniers (supposed to be a standard addtion staring with the 2011 models), and has a little higher bottom backet and gearing.

Both have served me well, and I would have no qualms about walking out and buying another one this afternoon for the same purposes...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Depending on the type of roads and distance of your commute, the perceived speed gain with the 700c in the CC might be insignificant. But it's YMMV as usual.
I wonder what's the difference once you factor in the tire sidewall height b/t the LHT's 26er vs. the CC's 700c.
 

·
a.k.a. MTBMaven
Joined
·
1,750 Posts
Could one put an LHT fork on a CC to get the additional brazons?

Other options for front racks to exist. Nashbar sells a little front rack that attaches to canti studs.

https://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_167593_-1_201521_10000_200411

VeloOrange has a few smaller front racks like this one that do not require mid-fork brazons:

https://www.velo-orange.com/racks.html

And Rivendell sells a few as well. My favorite is the Mark's Rack, which I own.

https://www.rivbike.com/products/show/mark-s-rack-nitto/20-108
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
My LHT isn't a "commuter" yet, althought I put about 30 miles on it a week these days. I am running Bontrager 700x38 Inverts( and they are funtionally 40's). It rides great with my 250lb self on it! I suppose that come close to "loaded". I've ridden a couple of CC's and I'll stick with my LHT on 38's, at least till I break below 200'. In case anyone is wondering, it's wine in the bag;) The fenders are from VO, and the whole bike was a budget build for about $700.
hvac59


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Hey HVAC - $700? How?

Hey There.
I've been having the CC vs. LHT discussion in my head as well. How did you end up doing an LHT for $700? I'd like to know.

Thanks!! - Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,144 Posts
I have owned both and I did not like the LHT for urban commuting - the handling was too sluggish. The LHT did not feel happy until it was loaded. The Crosscheck can be toured on also - you do not need eyelets on the fork to mount a front rack, just use c-clamps or get an Old Man Mountain rack (a rear rack is plenty for commuting anyway). Fully loaded the Crosscheck is just fine, it just isn't quite as stable as the LHT. The only thing wrong with the Crosscheck are those rear dropouts. I didn't like the 132.5mm spacing and forward facing slots. Makes getting a mountain hub in harder and requires too much QR clamping force to keep a road hub from pulling out.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top