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Yeah, and even sometimes we just waiting for the delivery date and they change and simply says "sorry for the inconvenience"
 

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I'm in NH, we have just about the lowest rate of unemployment in the country, and the governor cut off the extra unemployment several months ago, and literally every business has vacancies and restaurants are having to close on random days because they simply don't have enough staff.
Correct. Same thing happening where I live.

However now that funemployment is done and you can be evicted for not paying your rent...those positions will be filled again in the near future. Just give it a little time.

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Easier said than done when hospitals are overwhelmed and no one knows what's going on! Also 2% of the world's population is 140,000,000 people. Is that an acceptable price to make sure rich people in the US and Europe can ride a new bike they probably don't actually need?
Is it acceptable to destroy lives and businesses worldwide all over covid?

Everything that's been done to control the virus has proven to be ineffective. What we have been doing doesn't work. We aren't in charge of this pandemic. Covid is in charge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
We aren't in charge of this pandemic
I think we are. Top of my list today: poor politics, misinformation, reactions to conjecture, prevail. Apathetic reactions to weak leadership from any front, do not help. Then there is the question of what can any one person do to enact change?
Easy. Let someone make a suggestion/decision/statement then criticize it to no end.

@prj71-In all humility,I just wanted to use the words you wrote.✌

edited for my last sentence.
 

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I'm in NH, we have just about the lowest rate of unemployment in the country, and the governor cut off the extra unemployment several months ago, and literally every business has vacancies and restaurants are having to close on random days because they simply don't have enough staff.
my county has around 7k unemployed, and over 20k open positions. many of those open positions are for low pay service jobs, where the pay isn't high enough for ppl to actually live in the county. many of the others are for the local hospital. which are tough jobs due to the pandemic, but they're having trouble retaining ppl for reasons unrelated to the pandemic. It was a nonprofit hospital purchased by a for-profit corporation before the pandemic, and reports are that they don't treat their staff very well. so those jobs from staff who left are unlikely to be filled easily, because applicants know the problems with the employer.
 

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for me the supply chain issues are worse than the covid issues. My inventory levels are roughly 40% of normal. I have wrote $55,000 in checks to companies this week, but they can't tell me when i will recieve the goods. The supply chain will be wrecked for a couple more years. Prices are going to continue to go up, it is not because of greed, but because containers are being sent back to asia empty. so the importer(me) gets to pay for the freight both ways, so i pass that on to the consumer. My pay roll is $90,000 hirer this year than last year, that gets passed on also. Welcome to the new world.
 

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How about changing from using Supply Chains to Supply Belts? Belts are easier to maintain. Has anyone contacted Rohloff about this idea?
0.5/10
 

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my county has around 7k unemployed, and over 20k open positions. many of those open positions are for low pay service jobs, where the pay isn't high enough for ppl to actually live in the county.
My question is, does this really have an impact on return to employment, and if so, why? People still need to work to have an income, regardless of whether it covers 100% of their living expenses. The alternative is covering 0% of their living expenses (aside from state programs). If you don't work...how exactly do you survive? If there is a way to do this in normal times, I think I see the first problem...
 

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My question is, does this really have an impact on return to employment, and if so, why? People still need to work to have an income, regardless of whether it covers 100% of their living expenses. The alternative is covering 0% of their living expenses (aside from state programs). If you don't work...how exactly do you survive? If there is a way to do this in normal times, I think I see the first problem...
you mean the pay being insufficient to afford local living expenses?

I know a lot who changed industries during the pandemic for better pay/better treatment locally. I changed industries simply because of availability of work. A lot of people here did that, too.

A lot of the low-paid jobs that are open right now will probably remain unfilled since there aren't enough people already here to fill them. Who's going to relocate for a job that doesn't pay well enough? I know some people who commute very long distances for some of these jobs. That's an option for people who live in rural areas where there are few jobs of any sort and they've gotta drive no matter what. But unless I'm already living somewhere like that, again, I'm not going to relocate somewhere so I can commute an hour and a half to work as a server, dishwasher, or hotel cleaning staff. If that's my industry, I'm going to go somewhere that I can afford to live much closer to where I work.

I know some restaurants, especially, ARE paying people enough to afford the area. It's still a difficult environment for people in that industry. The general public is not behaving well. The abuse they have to deal with from customers is pretty widespread. Some are even getting attacked. I'd personally choose another industry if I had to deal with that crap too often.

I live in one of the states that ended extra benefits quite some time ago. It didn't really impact whether people returned to work on a large scale. Maybe for some, but it didn't generate any wholesale changes in the job market.
 

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for me the supply chain issues are worse than the covid issues. My inventory levels are roughly 40% of normal. I have wrote $55,000 in checks to companies this week, but they can't tell me when i will recieve the goods. The supply chain will be wrecked for a couple more years. Prices are going to continue to go up, it is not because of greed, but because containers are being sent back to asia empty. so the importer(me) gets to pay for the freight both ways, so i pass that on to the consumer. My pay roll is $90,000 hirer this year than last year, that gets passed on also. Welcome to the new world.
Yup. Recyclables & Ag products from 'Merica aren't too popular in Asia these days... And this really isn't anything new, American Trucking companies have passed dead-head monies onto the next paying load for decades and it's NOT changing anytime soon.
 

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Hang on, are you guys saying there's an issue with the supply chain?
First I have heard of it. No way can this be true.
 

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A lot of the low-paid jobs that are open right now will probably remain unfilled since there aren't enough people already here to fill them. Who's going to relocate for a job that doesn't pay well enough?
People who don't have any other skills beyond a high school diploma.

I know some restaurants, especially, ARE paying people enough to afford the area. It's still a difficult environment for people in that industry. The general public is not behaving well. The abuse they have to deal with from customers is pretty widespread. Some are even getting attacked. I'd personally choose another industry if I had to deal with that crap too often.
And now inflation wiped out the higher wages they've been clamoring for.




I've also noticed that going out to eat costs more than it used to...which is a direct result of wages rising in the restaurant industry. Not a surprise... It's been predicted that would happen if you gave the burger flipper $15/hour. So now I eat out less often.

I live in one of the states that ended extra benefits quite some time ago. It didn't really impact whether people returned to work on a large scale. Maybe for some, but it didn't generate any wholesale changes in the job market.
I think it will over time. For the majority of the country funemployment ended over labor day weekend and evictions moratoriums are starting to end So with that...it's either get to work or live on the park bench. It will take a few months before to see wholesale changes in the job market.
 

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And now inflation wiped out the higher wages they've been clamoring for.


I've also noticed that going out to eat costs more than it used to...which is a direct result of wages rising in the restaurant industry. Not a surprise... It's been predicted that would happen if you gave the burger flipper $15/hour. So now I eat out less often.
Your numbers don't add up. For every $10 spent to buy burgers, roughly $3.00 goes to paying labor. Using your source saying wages rose 3.6%, labor costs would have increased to $3.12. Twelve cents higher using your source.

You eat out less often because of that?
 

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Your numbers don't add up. For every $10 spent to buy burgers, roughly $3.00 goes to paying labor. Using your source saying wages rose 3.6%, labor costs would have increased to $3.12. Twelve cents higher using your source.

You eat out less often because of that?
You are assuming fast food workers got the average wage increase. Bad assumption.
 
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