Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 98 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,
Try to make this a short as possible. I bought a Paragon about 18months ago (after a 6 month wait for delivery) and after around 3 months the frame cracked near the top/seat tube join. Trek notified that there would be a delay before another Paragon was available, but that I could have a Superfly frame for £100. I jumped at it.
All was well for 4 months or so until my bike fell over in my back garden. When I picked it up I noticed that there was severe damage to the top tube, about halfway along. It looks like the handlebars must have tuned and hit the tube when it fell over. Gutted!
My LBS got in touch with Trek UK and they picked it up for inspection and decided that it was not covered under warranty. I was (and still am) under the opinion that it should be, as such a small impact such as this should not cause anything more than a scratch.
I then started a long dialog with Trek UK and was informed amongst other things that they have taken to a piece of carbon tubing with a hammer and not been able to cause any damage, and that striking aluminium and carbon together causes the aluminium to be damaged.
They agreed to supply me with another Paragon frame and send my Superfly to the US for inspection to check for manufacturing defects. If they found one they said I would be given another Superfly. This happened and they said they found nothing wrong, leaving me £100 out of pocket. Further negotiations followed and they eventually agreed to refund the £100.
Three points:
I think if there was no manufacturing defect, the frame should not have failed, so is there a design defect?
I'll be honest, having ridden the Superfly; the Paragon is not the same. I felt that I should have had a replacement Superfly supplied to me by Trek.
I should not have had to spend as much time as I did negotiating with the company to get to were I did.
What do you think? Would you still buy a Superfly?
Cheers,

Tim.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
I picked up a Superfly a couple of weeks ago. On the second ride on it (a night ride) I hit a rut going fast and slammed the bike into the ground hard. I was pretty worried that the frame was toast. the next morning I inspected it nothing but cosmetic damage and bent fork legs and a folded front wheel and bent rotor.

It was your negligence that let the bike fall and if it is going to fall on to a small point like the tip of a break lever its going to puncture carbon every time. I wouldn't have replaced your frame. It was incredible they got you a superfly for 100 and then just give you a free replacement after damage from user error.
 

·
Formerly of Kent
Joined
·
14,151 Posts
Regardless of what YOU think, there isn't a manufacturer out there who will provide a warranty (life long or otherwise) protecting against damage caused solely by the user/owner of the product.

If I was Trek/GF, I'd send you a Paragon frame, and call it done. They've bent over backwards for you so far.

Oh, and learn how to set your bike up properly next time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,508 Posts
I think everyone is being a little bit rough on you especially the guy saying you're negligence on leaning a bike up but....
I think you are pushing your luck for sure. You are pretty lucky you got one bike warrantied

timotimo said:
Hi Guys,
Try to make this a short as possible. I bought a Paragon about 18months ago (after a 6 month wait for delivery) and after around 3 months the frame cracked near the top/seat tube join. Trek notified that there would be a delay before another Paragon was available, but that I could have a Superfly frame for £100. I jumped at it.
All was well for 4 months or so until my bike fell over in my back garden. When I picked it up I noticed that there was severe damage to the top tube, about halfway along. It looks like the handlebars must have tuned and hit the tube when it fell over. Gutted!
My LBS got in touch with Trek UK and they picked it up for inspection and decided that it was not covered under warranty. I was (and still am) under the opinion that it should be, as such a small impact such as this should not cause anything more than a scratch.
I then started a long dialog with Trek UK and was informed amongst other things that they have taken to a piece of carbon tubing with a hammer and not been able to cause any damage, and that striking aluminium and carbon together causes the aluminium to be damaged.
They agreed to supply me with another Paragon frame and send my Superfly to the US for inspection to check for manufacturing defects. If they found one they said I would be given another Superfly. This happened and they said they found nothing wrong, leaving me £100 out of pocket. Further negotiations followed and they eventually agreed to refund the £100.
Three points:
I think if there was no manufacturing defect, the frame should not have failed, so is there a design defect?
I'll be honest, having ridden the Superfly; the Paragon is not the same. I felt that I should have had a replacement Superfly supplied to me by Trek.
I should not have had to spend as much time as I did negotiating with the company to get to were I did.
What do you think? Would you still buy a Superfly?
Cheers,

Tim.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
16,463 Posts
Not a manufacturer defect issue. Shouldn't have gotten such a thin-wall lightweight frame if you weren't going to take handlebar interference into account. Had you spun the bars on a ride and wiped, that would have destroyed the frame.

What's up with all these entitled Trek owners posting lately?

What's up with all these people that think everything should be covered on a warranty?

Here are two threads:
Owner's wife (on a Spec) damaged brake levers, complete with a sob story about how she was being responsible in avoiding injuring children, sacrificing herself and her bike:

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=522367

This one speaks for itself:
http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=527854
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,305 Posts
Out of curiosity, my GF and I have been trying to break a piece of left over carbon steerer tube with a hammer. We've barely been able to scratch it, it's ridiculous. I have no idea how one could damage it with an errant brake lever. I guess not all carbon is built the same though, steerer tubes are probably made a lot tougher than top tubes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,383 Posts
timotimo: ... was informed amongst other things that they have taken to a piece of carbon tubing with a hammer and not been able to cause any damage ...

That is really difficult for me to believe. In fact it makes no sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
In my defence, I reckon 99% of riders have dropped their bikes at some point, some people on a regular basis. The bike was set up as I picked it up and the breal lever is rounded off. There is no way that aluminium would have sustained damage like that. The implication made by Trek was that by bike had suffered a sever impact other than that caused by a fall.
It was my faukt that it fell over, but it should not have failed in that way.
Tim.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I posted the thread to let people know what happened to me. There's no need to get excited about it. OK, I still have a good bike, I'm satisfied(ish) with the outcome. Are there a load of Trek /GF diciples around here?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I had to push quite hard for the frame and even harder for the refund of the £100. The best I can say is that I was treated reasonably. I'm just imagining how I would feel if I had bought a Superfly from scratch and this happened. Pretty upset!
 

·
Jam Econo
Joined
·
4,211 Posts
bobbotron said:
Out of curiosity, my GF and I have been trying to break a piece of left over carbon steerer tube with a hammer. We've barely been able to scratch it, it's ridiculous. I have no idea how one could damage it with an errant brake lever. I guess not all carbon is built the same though, steerer tubes are probably made a lot tougher than top tubes.
Wall thickness of the tubing; yes a steerer is thicker walled than a top tube.

I had a Giant MCM back in the day, and crashed it in a race, only to be run over by hordes of blood thirsty sport riders. The top tube cracked in the center. It was ridiculously thin, and with the structure broken could be indented with your finger about a 1/4 of an inch.
I told my LBS it was in a race, and Giant replaced it, twice (second time I found a crack in the seatstay), for free.

The second replacement I sold and bought a steel frame, because the carbon at that time in mtb history wasn't up to what I was throwing at it.

Ironically, the steel replacement developed a crack in the down tube gusset a few month out of warranty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
450 Posts
something does not ad up

Where I agree having a handlebar set up on a collision course with a frame like that shows a lack of foresight the impact generated by the bike tipping over in the garden should have been minimal. You are talking about a gradual fall on what most likely was a soft surface with minimal inertia. Something does not ad up.
 

·
I don't huck.
Joined
·
2,538 Posts
I can see the pointed end of a brake lever hitting the center of a tube (the thinnest part most likely) as a pretty easy failure point. I bike falling to the ground and the handlebar whipping around is a fair amount of force in a few millimeters of square surface area.

Look at it this way. Pick up a ladies high heel shoe, hold it by the heel end and hit your knee cap with the sole of the shoe at the toe section. Hurt much? Not likely. Now grab it by the toe and hit your kneecap with the spiky heel part. Enjoy your limp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
886 Posts
timotimo said:
What do you think? Would you still buy a Superfly?
Cheers,

Tim.
Sounds like you were more than bent over backward for...they already did more than you could ask IMO.

Would I still buy a Fisher...yes, and more likely to do so seeing that they will go out of their way to take care of an issue and keep a customer riding, like they did in your case.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,305 Posts
CB2 said:
Wall thickness of the tubing; yes a steerer is thicker walled than a top tube.

I had a Giant MCM back in the day, and crashed it in a race, only to be run over by hordes of blood thirsty sport riders. The top tube cracked in the center. It was ridiculously thin, and with the structure broken could be indented with your finger about a 1/4 of an inch.
I told my LBS it was in a race, and Giant replaced it, twice (second time I found a crack in the seatstay), for free.

The second replacement I sold and bought a steel frame, because the carbon at that time in mtb history wasn't up to what I was throwing at it.

Ironically, the steel replacement developed a crack in the down tube gusset a few month out of warranty.
Yeah, I figured it was way thicker. I could imagine if you made a CF frame out of tubes that thick it would be:
a) indestructible
b) heavy
c) very stiff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
845 Posts
I just picked up a ladies high heel shoe but there was still a foot in it. Now I hurt a lot.

mtroy said:
Look at it this way. Pick up a ladies high heel shoe, hold it by the heel end and hit your knee cap with the sole of the shoe at the toe section. Hurt much? Not likely. Now grab it by the toe and hit your kneecap with the spiky heel part. Enjoy your limp.
 
1 - 20 of 98 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top