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What's up everyone? I am new to the forums but I've been on the MTBR site numerous times since I began riding more in the past few years. I've been riding the same flat platform pedals that came with my bike when I bought it. I'm trying to make a few upgrades in order to become more comfortable on the bike and so I can keep up more easily with my friends. I'm not all up on the clippless vs. the other types of shoes/pedals on the market so I was wondering if anyone can help me become more knowledgable on the subject. Also I am hoping that some of you can maybe help me out with a few suggestions on what a good shoe/pedal combo would be. I'm basicly a all mountain rider. I live in Reno, NV so I spend most of my time on the trails in Tahoe. I also enjoy going to the ski resorts and doing a little downhill action. I'm looking for a combo that would suite me the best and that won't empty my wallet. Any help explaining this to me along with any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks,
Chris
 

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Different brands of pedals use different cleats (the part you screw into the shoes). All shoes will accept all brands of cleats, but apparently some shoes might need to be cut slightly to fit some pedals.

I am very happy with my Time ATAC XS pedals but they do not have much of a platform. Time Z might be worth a look.

Find shoes that fit your feet. You should be able to attach them to your pedals of choice.
 

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I just bought my first bike and the pedals were the first things that went, came stock with crankbrothers eggbeaters. Those stayed on maybe 3 rides. Now i have Shimano SPD's. A night and day difference, feel much more comfortable on the bike.
 

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crnesst said:
Any comments on the Crank Bros Mallet C Pedals?
The Mallet C are basically like egg beaters with a platform type cage around them. The concept is good but the biggest problem with them and the shimano pedals with similar design is that the clip sticks up above the cage. So if you come unclipped or want to ride unclipped, your foot will slide around on the pedal, you won't get full grip on the cage. Also if you use this style of pedal, you will have to make sure to get shoes with a fairly flat bottom, or you may not be able to engage the cleat.

If you want something with a platform, take a look at the atomlab quiksteps, (http://www.speedgoat.com/product.asp?part=109569) but they may be above your budget. With these the clip is spring loaded and will retract out of the way if you are not clipped in. So you will still get very good grip on the pedals if you come out or want to ride unclipped.

I use these on my downhill/freeride bike and wouldn't trade them for anything for this type of riding.

The shoes I use are the Shimano Downhill shoes. 661 also makes spd compatible shoes which are flat on the bottom also.
 

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Inhale said:
What's the benefit of getting shoes? What is it that makes shoes for biking unique/better for the rider?
If you want to attach your feet to your pedals with "clipless" pedals, you need shoes that accept "cleats" on the bottom -> biking shoes.

Even if you use flat pedals, very stiff soles are good for efficiency and the wellbeing of your feet/arches. Most non-biking shoes are too flexy.
 
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