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I know this forum has made all the comparisons before but I'd like to put my mind at ease.

I have the Stumpy 100FSR Comp on lay-a-way right now. It sports 4 in of travel all around. I was talking with a riding buddy of mine and he suggested I get something with more travel - at least 5 inches and that I would outgrow the 100 too soon. He suggested the Enduro. He also suggested the FSR 120 but I think thats about $300-500 more and as you can see I can't even afford what I have on lay-a-way.

My climbing power isn't too strong, so I thought I would need the lock-out. Also, I've always had a hardtail and I've never ridden a full-susp bike for more than a few minutes. I've recently gotten a taste of what real singletrack is and I stink at decending. My buddys with 5-6 inches of travel always reach the bottom way ahead of me. Is the 4" of travel on the 100FSR enough for my ability?
 

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SabbathU71 said:
Is the 4" of travel on the 100FSR enough for my ability?
Dude, you'll be fine on that bike. I just went from HT to FSR100 and though I'm still adjusting to the transition, the benefits are unreal. If you are mostly an XC rider, you don't need the FSR120, the 100 will do everything you want it to and then some. It pedals well, will blow your mind on the descents and is fun as can be on the single track. If you are into and want to be into big drops and that kind of stuff, then maybe you should think about the 120 or something even beefier..
 

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Reporterkyle said:
Dude, you'll be fine on that bike. I just went from HT to FSR100 and though I'm still adjusting to the transition, the benefits are unreal. If you are mostly an XC rider, you don't need the FSR120, the 100 will do everything you want it to and then some. It pedals well, will blow your mind on the descents and is fun as can be on the single track. If you are into and want to be into big drops and that kind of stuff, then maybe you should think about the 120 or something even beefier..
Yes, it will handle a lot, just not big hits, drops etc.
If it has a Propedal rear shock, lockout shouldn't be an issue, they climb fine even with an "open" shock.
 

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I was in your spot two weeks ago. I went with the 120 expert, but I am 210 lbs. so the extra travel is worth it to me. And more importantly I got it for 2160.00, so I couldn't pass it up. It will be a huge difference between your HT on downhills.
 

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I switched from a medium 2004 FSR Comp (100) to a large 2005 120, mainly because I became convinced I bought the wrong size (I'm right between M and L).

I like my new bike a lot, but I think the Triad on my 100 was a better shock than the Septune on the 120. To me the firm Propedal, plush open, and lockout settings are the perfect range of choices. The 7-stage propedal on the Septune is overkill, and it has no lockout.

Having said that, the Septune is still fine, and the bike climbs and rides well with minimal or no bob.

I think you will be fine with the 100. It will be a HUGE upgrade from your hardtail, and comes with a better shock than the 120. You will be able to ride significantly rougher terrain with much more control and confidence. Plus you will have a lockout. I think you made a fine choice and I'd be surprised if you feel the need for more travel any time soon.
 

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I just popped for the 120 Pro. One of the things I really like is the adj travel fork. As I understand it the Talas and Minute both adjust. I ran through some really tight trees with the Minute cranked all the way dow. The bike is super quick and would be nervous as hell on a down hill. Comeing down a fast asphault descent back to the house, I let the shock back out and the bike felt as stable and forgiving as my old Rocky Slayer did, only about 5 lbs lighter ... This is my first experience with the Specialized and as far, so good!
 

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My 2 cents

I went through the same decision making process several months ago, with the exception that $$ wasn't the issue for me - I just wanted the bike that was right for me. I ended up with the '05 SJ 100 Expert. See my review under the bike review pages as to why I ended up there instead of with the 120. I wouldn't change anything in the review other than to say I am getting the bike dialed in well now. The previous posts are right - any move from the HT to a rear shock will be a HUGE deal. If you are a burly guy looking for extra plush or are looking to get aggressive on the downhills, give the 120 a go. If you are a skinny turd like me or are looking to get aggressive on the uphill/technical stuff, give the 100 a go.

Last comment: Previous post indicating that the triad 100 gives enough choice is right on. You just gotta get the right amount of pressure in there and the rest is easy.

Don't sweat the $$ - whichever bike you choose, it will pay out in diamonds for all the fun you'll have.
 

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SabbathU71 said:
I know this forum has made all the comparisons before but I'd like to put my mind at ease.

I have the Stumpy 100FSR Comp on lay-a-way right now. It sports 4 in of travel all around. I was talking with a riding buddy of mine and he suggested I get something with more travel - at least 5 inches and that I would outgrow the 100 too soon. He suggested the Enduro. He also suggested the FSR 120 but I think thats about $300-500 more and as you can see I can't even afford what I have on lay-a-way.

My climbing power isn't too strong, so I thought I would need the lock-out. Also, I've always had a hardtail and I've never ridden a full-susp bike for more than a few minutes. I've recently gotten a taste of what real singletrack is and I stink at decending. My buddys with 5-6 inches of travel always reach the bottom way ahead of me. Is the 4" of travel on the 100FSR enough for my ability?
I've got the fsr 100 Comp, and it's my 1st full suspension as well. I've only felt like I wanted a 120 once, and to be honest, that feeling had more to do with my (lack of) technical skills than the terrain actually being too rough for the 100.
 

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Honestly, once the bike is dialed in for you (weight and riding style), there isn't a HUGE difference between the 100 and 120 bikes. It's a noticable difference but, it's not like night and day (like going from a HT to a FS).

Bascially, I chose the 120 because I do not intend to race, I'm 180lbs and I'm over 40, so I need a plusher ride! :)
 

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DM-SC said:
Honestly, once the bike is dialed in for you (weight and riding style), there isn't a HUGE difference between the 100 and 120 bikes. It's a noticable difference but, it's not like night and day (like going from a HT to a FS).

Bascially, I chose the 120 because I do not intend to race, I'm 180lbs and I'm over 40, so I need a plusher ride! :)
I'm finding that with the ability to drop the front end down or raise it back up the 120 offers more handling options. I'm working that front fork every ride. Then again I'm riding extremely variable terrain. Cascade mountains single track and degraded fire road stuff where the flexibility of the 120 is a real benefit. You couldn't do that racing but then I adjust the fork while gasing for air! ...which lets me out of the racing crowd anyway, LOL
 

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I'm finding that with the ability to drop the front end down or raise it back up the 120 offers more handling options.
I had not used that option because it climbed fine. Then on a climb I thought WTF may as well use it. Damn, it did make a difference in how the front tracked over rough climbs. Now I use it everytime.
 

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I went from a hardtail and was debating between the 100 and 120, and ended up with the 100 but had a Talas put on up front. Perfect combination! I am primarily a cross country/trail rider, focus on climbs rather than descents, but end up faced with pretty technical downhills at times as well. The Talas gives lots of flexibilty up front--I drop it to 90mm for bigger climbs, and put it all the way out for technical descents or simply when I am cruising for fun. The 100 has the lockout mode, which to me is enough to make it better than the Septune. The difference between the two is a mere 20mm, which is about 0.8 of an inch, and once I had the 100 dialed in right for me, I can't imagine that the 120 would be any better or more efficient unless you are doing drops or weigh a ton.

Even without the Talas, I would recommend sticking with the 100.
 

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100 vs. 120... hmmmmm.

You could end up with not enough bike - 100, or, you could always have more than enough. Hmmmmmmmmm.

If I could ever decide to get rid of my Epic, I would get the StumpJumper FSR 120.
 
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