Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,

I build myself a bike around the FSR Pro 2010 frame. Did few ride with it so far and its getting better rides after rides. First thing I notice about the pressure is that I'm far from what Specialized recommend in their manual. If I'm not mistaking, for 190pds rider like me, they recommend something over 200psi. My best result for all around riding is more around 150-160psi. The thing is if I'm going on a trails that has jump and drops I bottom the shock pretty much all the time. If I add more pressure, then when I'm just riding normal trails, it's like I'm sitting on a rock.

setting : brain 2-3 click from full open rebound 4-5 click from full fast

How are you riding yours? Are you changing your shock pressure depending on the trails your are heading each time?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,673 Posts
This chart shows the recommended starting pressure and settings for a 2010 Stumpjumper FSR.

http://cdn.specialized.com/OA_MEDIA/pdf/manuals/010_Shock_Fork_Setup_Chart_8-5x11_r5.pdf

If you've got a 26" Stumpjumper FSR then the recommended starting pressure for the rear shock is 230PSI. That's quite a bit higher than the 150PSI that you're using at the moment.

Is your rear brain setting two clicks clockwise from the dial being turned fully counter clockwise? (where fully clockwise on the dial is full firm and fully counter clockwise is full soft/ open) At that setting there should be hardly any brain platform at all.

If you let all the air out of the rear shock does the rear suspension feel smooth when you move it through its travel? Even with a brand new bike it's possible that some bearings may be sticky or the shock's air sleeve may need re-greasing if there's a lot of stiction.

Have a look at this post where PB Matrix took his brand new 2010 Stumpjumper FSR apart and found it had both those issues.

http://forums.mtbr.com/showpost.php?p=6322093&postcount=38

Those are some things to look at if you feel it's lacking small bump sensitivity.:)

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
Suspension is a personal thing and dependent on the trails you ride/race on. I tweak mine a little bit for the different terrains and how I'm going to ride it.

Yanick, I've only got about 60hrs of riding/racing on my '10 S-Works Stumpie FSR but here's what I would recommend you try...

Add some more PSI to the front end, set the brain to 4 clicks from fully locked out and move your rebound so it's pretty fast but not mega-fast, try backing it off from full fast by about 10-15 clicks.

For myself, I've found the key is to set things up so the front end is resistive to brake dive (needs more PSI) yet compliant and fast enough to deal with terrain.

A couple of weeks ago I raced BCBR which was 8 days of stage racing covering approx 24hrs of racing and 25,000' vert gain on gnarly West Coast BC conditions. The bike performed flawlessly.

Here's what I was ripping down on the weekend:

http://shaundoreenevankeegan.blogspot.com/2010/07/some-riding-in-kananaskis-country.html

Let me know if you have any questions...
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top