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I had a Pike in 150mm and it was a little bit difficult to keep the front wheel on the ground in technical climbs. Now I went back to 140mm and I am sometimes close to go over the bars in steep downhill but for climbing it works very well.
I guess I have to find a compromise there as both my climbs and downhills are quite steep and technical. I was wondering if I should maybe try 150mm with a lower rise handlebar, I’ve 25mm at the moment and only 5mm spacer under the stem.
I guess the longer chainstay on the S5 and S6 might help to keep both wheels on the ground but I have the S4 with the relative short chainstay
 

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That’s my current build, quite dialed but I’m looking for a new tire set, I was thinking maybe aggressor/dhf
I have tried the continental baron/kaiser the grip was incredible on wet roots and stones but too draggy so went back to the oem tires at the moment

And I’m not 100% happy with the e- thirteen HelixR cassette the shifting is not as good as full shimano…

 

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I had a Pike in 150mm and it was a little bit difficult to keep the front wheel on the ground in technical climbs. Now I went back to 140mm and I am sometimes close to go over the bars in steep downhill but for climbing it works very well.
I guess I have to find a compromise there as both my climbs and downhills are quite steep and technical. I was wondering if I should maybe try 150mm with a lower rise handlebar, I’ve 25mm at the moment and only 5mm spacer under the stem.
I guess the longer chainstay on the S5 and S6 might help to keep both wheels on the ground but I have the S4 with the relative short chainstay
I am running a 20 mm rise bar with 10 mm of spacers. Also ride a lot of technical climbing and find the bike climbs incredibly well, but I am also used to riding my Enduro full time. My view might be biased because of the bikes I have been riding over the last five years.
 

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I am running a 20 mm rise bar with 10 mm of spacers. Also ride a lot of technical climbing and find the bike climbs incredibly well, but I am also used to riding my Enduro full time. My view might be biased because of the bikes I have been riding over the last five years.
+1 for the stumpy, enduro combo!
 

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Took out the pads and cleaned them (brake cleaner) as well as the rotors. Spend 15 min bedding them in.
Lots of squealing initially but instant lock up.
Then when the squealing stopped they lost gripping power.
Added some water to the mix and power returned again along with the squealing.
Waited an hour or so and tried again. Easy to lock up but no squealing.
Won't know for sure until I hit the trails, but it's a hellava lot better than it was.

Cheers to all who replied.

NOTE: while I had the pads out I checked for leaks and alignment. No issues.
The squealing returned, however the power/lock up remained so I felt it was an ok trade off.
Eventually the slight whistle (initial engagement) and full blown squeal (just before lock up) got to me.

I tried everything from cleaning/sanding the rotors to swapping the pads (front/back).
Rear brake (with front pads) replicated the noise.

No leaks and no power loss at the lever.

I finally fixed the issue with these!

I hardly notice any power loss (compared to metallic) and they are absolutely silent! Also,I find I can modulate them and
not lock up the rear tire as easily (or by mistake).

Keeping the metallic in the front as they are quite and I want that instant bite when required.
 

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The squealing returned, however the power/lock up remained so I felt it was an ok trade off.
Eventually the slight whistle (initial engagement) and full blown squeal (just before lock up) got to me.

I tried everything from cleaning/sanding the rotors to swapping the pads (front/back).
Rear brake (with front pads) replicated the noise.

No leaks and no power loss at the lever.

I finally fixed the issue with these!

I hardly notice any power loss (compared to metallic) and they are absolutely silent! Also,I find I can modulate them and
not lock up the rear tire as easily (or by mistake).

Keeping the metallic in the front as they are quite and I want that instant bite when required.
Just this last weekend, my front brakes started howling and pulsating on a extended downhill run. The rear already had some issues wailing as they heat up. I had sanded the rear previously, but it only marginally helped. My XT brakes on my other bike have been worked harder and not a peep out of those. Both use metallic pads. Main difference is my other bike has ice tech rotors while my Stumpy has the stock ones. I ended up ordering a couple sets of the MTX ceramic red pads to try out. Supposedly have great power and run silent. Have not tested them yet though. Red Label RACE Brake Pads - MTX Braking
 

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My SLX are squealing/howling as well it is super annoying, plus some curious vibrations sometimes but the power remains constant. I’ve checked the alignment, bled them twice but no improvements. It’s my first Shimano brakes but I am used to service other mineral oil and dot 5.1 brakes for like 15years so I don’t think I am doing something wrong there. I am running the Galfer 200mm rotors with the original metallic pads. I have used some organic pads this spring before it was too warm and it was indeed less noisy but not silent still, they were good for cold weather but they don’t bite strong enough when getting warm these days I had to go back to the shimano metallic pads.
I think that I have some spare pads from Galfer and from Trickstuff somewhere I might give a try…
 

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My SLX are squealing/howling as well it is super annoying, plus some curious vibrations sometimes but the power remains constant. I’ve checked the alignment, bled them twice but no improvements. It’s my first Shimano brakes but I am used to service other mineral oil and dot 5.1 brakes for like 15years so I don’t think I am doing something wrong there. I am running the Galfer 200mm rotors with the original metallic pads. I have used some organic pads this spring before it was too warm and it was indeed less noisy but not silent still, they were good for cold weather but they don’t bite strong enough when getting warm these days I had to go back to the shimano metallic pads.
I think that I have some spare pads from Galfer and from Trickstuff somewhere I might give a try…
Did you clean the rotors/pads? Do the pads look glazed at all? I would clean with isopropyl and maybe sand the pads a little.
 

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Did you clean the rotors/pads? Do the pads look glazed at all? I would clean with isopropyl and maybe sand the pads a little.
Yes I’ve cleaned them with isopropyl and sanded them and the pads look visually alright, I don’t think there were ever contaminated or something otherwise I would have expected some power loss but they still bite very strong. I have some code RSC on my big bike and I would say that the power is similar between the two, but the codes are dead silent except when it’s really wet and cold.

I was wondering if there is some time where some pistons move more than the others and then the two pads don’t press equally/parallel on the disc
 

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1939275


A few more rides on the Ohlins and I think I have it pretty well dialed in. Ryan and the crew at Fluid Focus nailed the tune on the TTX Air. Still need to swap back to the stock setup for comparison sake, but still loving this bike.
 

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I find the OEM shock amazing so I'm curious as to what the Ohlins offers over the OEM?
I had zero complaints with the stock setup. I just like to tinker and in theory this setup should be more stable on longer rough descents since there is a lot more oil and it is a twin tube design. Putting my stock rear shock back on today so I can get a feel for the differences.
 

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The difference from the Enduro to the Evo is pretty dramatic. Although the Enduro pedals exceptionally well, it still feels like a very big bike. My feedback is that the Enduro is built for BIG mountain descents and to cover up mistakes when you are completely gassed in technical sections. The bike feels completely unflappable at speed in the rough. It is an EWS style race bike through and through. It is not a bike to go out and jib with or ride casually. If you are not on the gas pushing at 90%+ it isn't much fun. Get in the right terrain though? Hold on because the bike is faster than you unless you happen to be capable of winning an EWS event as a pro. You will find yourself going faster, braking later and riding sections you never considered before.

The Evo feels much more like a traditional trail/AM bike and is better for 95% of the riders out there. There is not a single section that it can't get through that they Enduro can. The difference is speed and margin for error. On most trails it is as fast as the Enduro. We are very fortunate where I live to have properly rowdy and steep trails that tend to be mostly off map. Even on most of those trails the Evo can keep up with the Enduro just fine, but there are a few trails where it is absolutely no contest. On one of the particularly demanding trails the Enduro gapped the Evo by 15 seconds over a 3 minute segment. This was on back to back days pushing as hard as I could and I set a PR with the Evo prior to smashing it with the Enduro. On the opposite side, the Evo is way more fun to pop off side hits, snap through corners, etc. It is a bike that wants you to have fun. It also feels much better on more XC style trails vs the Enduro. I have no problem putting in big days on the Enduro, but the sections between the descents are treated as transfer stages rather than part of the ride if that makes sense.

The SJ takes another step towards the Trail category and away from a big bike like the Enduro. You feel a lot more feedback from the trail, but the geo is spot on. I have mine setup with a 150 fork and in the Low setting so my HA is around 64.7 and the reach is actually a few mm's longer than the Evo. With the SJ, it begs you to hammer the flats and smash the climbs rather than just "getting up" them. On the descents it is an absolute weapon because it is so easy and natural to change lines and switch things up.

I just got on the bike about 10 days ago and on one of my setup rides I was out with one of the fast local guys. For locals, we were riding Elfin Forest specifically Equine Incline and Secret Trail for the descents. These are traditional Socal style trails that are rough, high speed with some steeper sections separated by some flats with lots of rocks and chunder. I told my riding partner that I was going to take it easy since it was a setup ride and that is what I "did". When we got to the bottom of the first descent he looked back at me and asked why I was pushing so hard. I had thought he was just taking it easy and personally was just riding a comfortable pace. Turns out I was on par with my fastest times of the year on those trails. Out of curiosity I went out the next day on the Enduro and pushed as hard as I could. Net result was 1 - 2 seconds faster on the Enduro, so not much in it.

Net result for me is that as a one bike solution I would take the Evo. It is a Swiss Army Knife of flexibility that can be ridden anywhere from Whistler (I spend 5 days on my previous gen Evo there riding everything) to being enjoyable on classic XC singletrack. For a two bike solution Enduro and SJ. The SJ is an incredibly capable bike and one of the few that I have gotten on recently and been really blown away. Far more capable than I thought it would be and I have every intention of it being my daily driver. I won't be pulling out the Enduro a lot other than Park days or a few very specific off map riding areas that have pretty rowdy descents. The Epic Evo is in too small of a niche for what I like to ride, but if your trails tend to the more XC side of things I have heard it is a great bike.

Hope this helps, but let me know any questions.
Excellent comparison, thank you so much! Now if someone can throw Ripmo V2 into the mix that would wonderful!
 

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This makes me wonder if a 150mm on my 2021 Carbon Comp will put the handling closer to my 2017 Expert. I really dig the 21 for trail but it's missing that little something that makes me smile more.

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This makes me wonder if a 150mm on my 2021 Carbon Comp will put the handling closer to my 2017 Expert. I really dig the 21 for trail but it's missing that little something that makes me smile more.

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I highly recommend a 150 36 on this bike. Geometry is really good with this setup and you can definitely take advantage of the extra travel.
 

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I am also a fan of how the bike handles with the 36 @ 150. I enjoyed the 34 too, but the BB is way low and the 36 just feels better. The HA change is less noticeable to me as it's pretty slacked out both ways.
 

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I am also a fan of how the bike handles with the 36 @ 150. I enjoyed the 34 too, but the BB is way low and the 36 just feels better. The HA change is less noticeable to me as it's pretty slacked out both ways.
You guys need to stop hyping going to 150mm, or I'll end up giving in, spending money I shouldn't and likely join in on the praises and in the process, convince some other poor person to spend their hard earned $$. ;)
 
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