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Discussion Starter #1
Rumor has it that there is a 2021 version on the way.

Will we see an ST and an LT version?
Where will it sit in relation to the Stumpy Evo?

(Picture is photoshop)
 

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Over on the Enduro2020 thread someone pointed out that the new Stumpy is unlikely to be a miniaturized version of the Enduro because of the weight that come with that suspension design ...something like 20 bearings and associated hardware being too heavy. Just make them all ceramic?
 

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My guess: new 115 bike, named Camber or Epic Evo, Sumpies at 130, and 145. Sumpy gets more forward lower pivot, higher AS with similar linkage to current.

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Over on the Enduro2020 thread someone pointed out that the new Stumpy is unlikely to be a miniaturized version of the Enduro because of the weight that come with that suspension design ...something like 20 bearings and associated hardware being too heavy. Just make them all ceramic?
Seems to me the weight increase would be due to the size of the links more than the quantity of bearings. The upper and lower rockers are both pretty large and thick, if you were using a shorter stroke shock or slightly different designs, you could cut weight there by reducing the size of those links.

It'd be surprising to me if they spent the R&D to get the Demo linkage to the Enduro and not continue the trend to their more aggressive trailbikes.
 

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Santa Cruz continued down the path...nearly 1lb heavier from the HTLT to the HT2, for example. I told my buddies this was coming a while back, just to take the chance I am right when it does pop. LOL
 

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I would take the trade off, weight vs pedaling, any day of the week. For me the only place that weight really matters is wheels or a full XC racing rig.

Just put the new rear end on the current Evo front end and done!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just put the new rear end on the current Evo front end and done!
And a proper length headtube on the Evo, 105mm is daft. Havent seen anyone with a slammed bar on the Evo, everyone I've seen has a stack of spacers and a high rise bar!
 

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To get me back on a stumpy a few things seem to need attention. Slacken the front, steepen the seat angle, get the reach figured out a tad, and address the monstrous stack height on the larges. In addition I am able to slam a 170mm One Up in my HT2 medium that I am fairly positive I can't on the new stumpy.

I am a weird one where I am always between the medium and the large on the last few iterations of the stumpy, or the Hightower (as another example), but switching up to the large currently really gets a tad too wonky for me. I want the medium to have some additional room and let me run a big dropper. Then we'll talk. I'm always a fan of the stumpy tech.
 

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To get me back on a stumpy a few things seem to need attention. Slacken the front, steepen the seat angle, get the reach figured out a tad, and address the monstrous stack height on the larges. In addition I am able to slam a 170mm One Up in my HT2 medium that I am fairly positive I can't on the new stumpy.

I am a weird one where I am always between the medium and the large on the last few iterations of the stumpy, or the Hightower (as another example), but switching up to the large currently really gets a tad too wonky for me. I want the medium to have some additional room and let me run a big dropper. Then we'll talk. I'm always a fan of the stumpy tech.
You are not weird, I am on an XL compared to a LG with my other bikes to get the reach I like. My gut is that the uptake on the SJ Evo really surprised Specialized and we will see the standard move much closer to that geo. A 470 reach (LG) with a 65 HA, 76 SA and reasonable stack would put it solidly middle of the contemporary pack.
 

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I’m pretty friendly with the local shop and they other day I was there checking out the stumpy EVO and wishing it came in bigger sizes. The mechanic told me not to buy a current bike, but to wait for the next round of bikes to be released. It wasn’t clear what the timeframe was, but he does know that I’m looking for a s4 or s5 evo type bike in 29er that I could use locally as well as at the bike park. Wait and see I guess.
 

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I think the question is more why would they change the Stumpy that soon after spending all that money to design a new frame for 2019? The 2020's just recently hit their website. A new hybrid Stumpy/Enduro frame doesn't make financial sense unless the current models are completely bombing at the dealers which I don't believe they are. They have 3 flavours of Stumpy and a new Enduro and Demo - pretty cool really. I can see slight frame geo revisions happening but not a new design.

Also, waiting for the next design is a tiring game - similar to vehicles really. Don't buy a 2019 because 2021 will be the new better design - but then at the end of 2021 the rumors start about the next version in 2023, etc. It's the cell phone model of sales and it works well.

Love my Evo 29 and Stumpy 29 …….
 

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Rename the current Stumpy ST to "the Camber" and make a bad-ass new Stumpy with modern geo. The current short travel version likely appeals to folks who don't want to go anywhere near full enduro but want to smooth out their local, flat, twisty, slightly rooty "trails"
 

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Rename the current Stumpy ST to "the Camber" and make a bad-ass new Stumpy with modern geo. The current short travel version likely appeals to folks who don't want to go anywhere near full enduro but want to smooth out their local, flat, twisty, slightly rooty "trails"
No thanks, bring out a new proper Camber! I've got a '17 Camber and a '19 Stumpy. Used to have a '17 Stumpy with a few mods as well.

My go-to bike for the terrain I ride most is the Camber. Unless you are riding down enduro trails, the Camber is faster than the ST, and just as much fun. It still fits that spot between the Epic Evo and the ST. IMO, of course :)

I'd think they'd spec the LT with a 160 fork and new components, more or less like they did with the previous gen (140->150 fork). Can't see them designing a new frame this soon.

I see people complain about the head tube lenght, just when Spec shortened it because so many people complained it was too tall on the previous gen...
 

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I think the question is more why would they change the Stumpy that soon after spending all that money to design a new frame for 2019? The 2020's just recently hit their website. A new hybrid Stumpy/Enduro frame doesn't make financial sense unless the current models are completely bombing at the dealers which I don't believe they are.
The current version was outdated when it was released, the geo was pretty far behind current trends (EVO aside). If you compare the Transition SBG bikes, which is pretty close to what most bikes were headed towards at that time, the reach, HTA, wheelbase, and offset figures were all very different (much shorter, mainly) than what the trend was then and especially considering trends now. So in the midst of a pretty major shift in geometry trends, they released a bike that was already behind what everything else was. It was less of an issue when released because only a handful of other bikes at the time had been updated, but now basically everyone else has moved on to modern geo.

Most 29ers have moved on since then and they're still behind, so from a design POV, I think it makes sense for them to update it. I don't know how that impacted sales, but I can't imagine it was a positive.
 

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The current version was outdated when it was released, the geo was pretty far behind current trends (EVO aside). If you compare the Transition SBG bikes, which is pretty close to what most bikes were headed towards at that time, the reach, HTA, wheelbase, and offset figures were all very different (much shorter, mainly) than what the trend was then and especially considering trends now. So in the midst of a pretty major shift in geometry trends, they released a bike that was already behind what everything else was. It was less of an issue when released because only a handful of other bikes at the time had been updated, but now basically everyone else has moved on to modern geo.

Most 29ers have moved on since then and they're still behind, so from a design POV, I think it makes sense for them to update it. I don't know how that impacted sales, but I can't imagine it was a positive.
Exactly that.
 

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Exactly that.
I beg to differ - this is why they made the EVO. The standard Stumpy should be a bike that handles general (natural) trail riding. It shouldn't be superlong, superslack or monster wheelbase'd, most people I know where I ride (including myself) even run the Stumpy in high mode when not doing full-on gravity.

If they go the trend-route, they will end up with another EVO that handles parks & shuttling great, but sucks everywhere else.

One of my friends dropped his Enduro for a Stumpy LT, and won the National Enduro series (masters class) with it this year. His reason for the switch being that it pedals so much better than the Enduro.

So IMO we need to look at what the intended use is for each bike, and not make all of them the same. The Stumpy has sold rather well over here (Scandinavia), considering that nobody wants to have the same bike as anyone else...
 

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I beg to differ - this is why they made the EVO. The standard Stumpy should be a bike that handles general (natural) trail riding. It shouldn't be superlong, superslack or monster wheelbase'd, most people I know where I ride (including myself) even run the Stumpy in high mode when not doing full-on gravity.
It doesn't have to be super slack and aggressive to match current trends, that's not necessarily the point of the modern geo. Most modern geo bikes have a slightly slacker HTA, longer wheelbase, and mostly, reduced offset fork. These trends were more or less first released on the SBG bikes by Transition, then adopted by everyone else. AFAIK the SJ is one of the only largely distributed 29ers still on a 51mm offset fork (the offset alone isn't necessarily the issue, rather that it represents one obvious part of the overall dated design).

The Smuggler and Optic are both good examples of bikes that are trailbikes, remain nimble, with less of a gravity focus and more of a balanced focus. The geo trends there are what Specialized should have followed with the main line Stumpjumper and didn't.

Hell, even XC bikes are following the same trends: slacker, a bit longer, and with a reduced offset fork.

You may not care, it may not matter to the people you ride with, and it may suite your purposes all really well, that's subjective. What's objectively true is that the industry was going one direction when it was released and Specialized didn't follow those trends with the new bike, that's pretty easy to see now given where the other bikes in the industry and lineup are compared to the SJ, although slightly less obvious when it was released. It's also the reason why the design cycle for the current model is likely to be shorter than others.
 
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