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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was installing a star nut in a new Karate Monkey rigid fork last night. A few attempts didn't work and were not pulling things together. I ended up spinning the nut inside the steer tube, which left a small groove inside the steer tube, not deep, but I can feel it when I run my finger across it. I used another star nut with a proper tool and got it to set properly. (By proper tool I mean chopping an old wood broomstick down and drilling a hole for the bolt.)

Question is, should I be concerned about a small groove on the inside of a steel steer tube catastrophically failing? It lines up to the mid point of my stem. It's high enough up on the steer tube that I could chop it off and still have enough steer tube, but I'd like to keep the steer tube at its current length to use my current long stem/funky bar setup.
 

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Groove thing

I agree with riderx. I don't think the groove that was induced as a result of the nut rotating in the ID of the steerer tube significant. Typically, any base metal reduction within piping or tubing is not a concern if the remaining thickness is within 75% of nominal thickness. In reality you are dealing with a minimum wall thickness issue rather than a typical stress riser. Although the tube my be chome moly, it's still considered mild steel and is pretty ductile and forgiving of such defects. Good luck and ride on.
 
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