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I have a son who is now a college athlete. In the training through summer we found an article on German volume training and shifted gears. The basics were 10 sets of 10 with body parts grouped. It was a great program and helped me a lot not only in strength gains but healing some nagging old man injuries. Opening your mind to CrossFit, volume training, etc helps a lot
 

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9 lives
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Discussion Starter #423
We did a 3km warm up run, set up the aluminum festivus pole, performed feats of strength and afterwards enjoyed a delicious festivus nut-meatless loaf (vegan) for dinner. Festivus for the rest of us is the time to air the grievances and unravel a couple of workout miracles

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For 2021 my goal is to be more consistent with my functional training and core workout. I’m passionate about cycling and being blessed to live next to my local trails and having perfect Southern California weather it’s hard to resist going out for a ride instead of training in my garage gym.
 

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56 years old, I've been weight training since the age of 12 and biking longer than that, reading too many articles and trying so many variables. What rings true in my experience for strength is that you have to challenge yourself. You have to change your workouts. Above all you should use the correct technique.
As with most things regarding fitness, your results may vary due to genetics, drive, ambition and resolve. And that's fine. Most importantly do something. I know that I'm preaching to the quire here but far too many of us eat too much(still do that), eat poorly(I do that too) and don't get enough exercise (I'm borderline there). Effort is important in all of the above and I hope you all join me in improving in all these areas. Perfection is un-achievable, improvement is easy, ad a rep a day or a pound of resistance a day, or add speed and or distance every day and improvement will come, along with a sense of accomplishment.
 

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For 2021 my goal is to be more consistent with my functional training and core workout. I’m passionate about cycling and being blessed to live next to my local trails and having perfect Southern California weather it’s hard to resist going out for a ride instead of training in my garage gym.
so as a 'lifer' here's a thought that may help with your goals. I am probably the opposite in all ways. I live in the gloomy at times midwest. I spend most of my days in my basement gym, and dabble in cycling when time and conditions permit. I've been at the bike a bit more. Perhaps the fix is schedule. I lift three days per week, and run/ride, three. One thing that may give you a little boost, set a schedule, on certain days, take a short ride and use that as a cardio warmup for your lifting. Get that fix, and the blood flowing, or, use the trails like a parkour...ride a mile, drop and do X pushups. another mile, 3x 1 minute planks, another mile, curl your bike or an object, add some dips, pull ups, etc. Plenty of options along the ride I am sure if you get creative. Assuming you are riding at a good cadence, leg work is likely not needed.
 

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56 years old, I've been weight training since the age of 12 and biking longer than that, reading too many articles and trying so many variables. What rings true in my experience for strength is that you have to challenge yourself. You have to change your workouts. Above all you should use the correct technique.
As with most things regarding fitness, your results may vary due to genetics, drive, ambition and resolve. And that's fine. Most importantly do something. I know that I'm preaching to the quire here but far too many of us eat too much(still do that), eat poorly(I do that too) and don't get enough exercise (I'm borderline there). Effort is important in all of the above and I hope you all join me in improving in all these areas. Perfection is un-achievable, improvement is easy, ad a rep a day or a pound of resistance a day, or add speed and or distance every day and improvement will come, along with a sense of accomplishment.
amen to all of this. My biggest key is consistency and mindset. Once I get started, it's easier to maintain a good system. One that helps with the eating/junk, I read a lot about intermittent fasting or basically for me, having an 8 hour window for meals. One thing it did, it focused what I ate and how much I ate. I figured if I was buying in...go in. Eat better food choies. Meals became more important because it was what I needed to work out so I ate better. Consistent workout schedules helps a lot too. If I know I need to hit the gym after coming home from work I am more likely to do it, instead of finding multiple distractions.
 

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Discussion Starter #428
This is incredible! I love stories like this. We have a veteran on my unit who will be turning 108 in 2 weeks. He just started to need a wheelchair for mobility. He reads a newspaper every day and still has a wicked sense of humour. He wasn't a cyclist but rugby was his sport when her was "younger"

105-Year-Old Cyclist Rides 14 Miles In An Hour En Route To A World Record
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Frenchman Robert Marchand set a new world record Wednesday when he cycled 22.547 kilometers (about 14 miles) in an hour — at the age of 105.

Wearing a purple and yellow cycling suit, pink helmet and yellow glasses, Marchand completed 92 laps at the Velodrome National, an indoor track near Paris that's used for elite cycling events. According to The Associated Press, he set a new record for the 105-plus age group and received a standing ovation from people in the crowd, who chanted "Robert, Robert" as he rolled to a stop.

Still, he said he could have done better.

"I did not see the sign warning me I had 10 minutes left," Marchand said, according to the AP. "Otherwise I would have gone faster, I would have posted a better time. I'm now waiting for a rival."

For comparison, the U.K.'s Bradley Wiggins rode 54.526 kilometers (about 34 miles) in 2015 and holds the record for the men's hour, the BBC reported.

"I am not here to be champion. I am here to prove that at 105 years old you can still ride a bike," Marchand said, per Eurosport.

His record-breaking ride Wednesday was incredible, but Marchand's entire life has been a series of singular events. The AP has this on his background:

"Marchand, a former firefighter who was born in 1911 in the northern town of Amiens, has lived through two world wars. He led an eventful life that took him to Venezuela, where he worked as a truck driver near the end of the 1940s. He then moved to Canada and became a lumberjack for a while.
"Back in France in the 1960s, Marchand made a living through various jobs that left him with no time to practice sports.
"He finally took up his bike again when he was 68 years old and began a series of cycling feats.
"The diminutive Marchand — he is 1.52 meters (5-foot) tall and weighs 52 kilograms (115 pounds) — rode from Bordeaux to Paris, and Paris to Roubaix several times. He also cycled to Moscow from Paris in 1992.
"Ten years later, he set the record for someone over the age of 100 riding 100 kilometers (62 miles)."
So what's his secret? Marchand's coach and friend Gerard Mistler told the AP it's simple: He eats fruits and vegetables, doesn't smoke, drinks wine only on occasion, goes to bed at 9 p.m. and exercises every day.


Mistler, perhaps cognizant of the cloud of doubt that hovers over impressive cycling performances, told the news service: "If [he] had been doping, he would not be there anymore."

As if this story couldn't get any better, here's some amazing photos of the feat.

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Discussion Starter #429
This article is more related to overall fitness, but the principles are applicable for anyone wanting a boost, or are stuck at home. Most of my daily WODs are HIIT and this study supports what is already known about the benefits of high intensity interval training

An 11-Minute Body-Weight Workout With Proven Fitness Benefits

Five minutes of burpees, jump squats and other calisthenics significantly improve aerobic endurance, according to one of the first randomized, controlled trials to test the effects of brief body-weight workouts. The study’s findings are predictable but reassuring, at a time when many of us are relying on short exercise sessions in our homes to gain or retain our fitness. They provide scientific assurance that these simple workouts will work, physiologically, and our burpees will not be in vain.

Last year, when the pandemic curtailed traditional gym hours and left many people hesitant to exercise outside on crowded sidewalks or paths, quite a few of us moved our workouts indoors, into our living rooms or basements, altering how we exercise. Some of us purchased stationary bicycles and started intense spin classes or turned to online personal trainers and yoga classes. But many of us started practicing some version of a body-weight routine, using calisthenics and other simple strength-training exercises that rely on our body weight to provide resistance.

Body-weight training has been a staple of exercise since almost time immemorial, of course. Usually organized as multiple, familiar calisthenics performed one after another, this type of exercise has gone by various names, from Swedish Exercises a century ago to the Royal Canadian Air Force’s Five Basic Exercises (5BX) program in the 1960s, to today’s Scientific 7-Minute Workout and its variations.

In general, one of the hallmarks of these programs is that you perform the exercises consecutively but not continuously; that is, you complete multiple repetitions of one exercise, pause and recover, then move on to the next. This approach makes the workouts a form of interval training, with bursts of intense exertion followed by brief periods of rest.

Traditional interval training has plenty of scientific backing, with piles of research showing that a few minutes — or even seconds — of strenuous intervals, repeated several times, can raise aerobic fitness substantially. But the exercise in these studies usually has involved stationary cycling or running.

Few experiments have examined the effects of brief body-weight workouts on endurance and strength, and those few had drawbacks. Most focused on people who already were fit, and almost none met the scientific gold standard of being randomized and including an inactive control group. Consequently, our faith in the benefits of short body-weight training may have been understandable, but evidence was lacking.

So, for the new study, which was published this month in the International Journal of Exercise Science, researchers at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., decided to develop and test a basic body-weight routine. They modeled their version on the well-known 5BX program, which once had been used to train members of the Canadian military in remote posts. But the researchers swapped out elements from the original, which had included exercises like old-fashioned situps that are not considered particularly good for the back or effective in building endurance.

They wound up with a program that alternated one minute of calisthenics, including modified burpees (omitting the push-ups that some enthusiasts tack onto the move) and running in place, with a minute of walking, also in place. The routine required no equipment, little space and a grand total of 11 minutes, including a minute for warming up and cooling down.

They then recruited 20 healthy but out-of-shape young men and women, measured their current fitness, leg power and handgrip strength and randomly assigned half to start practicing the new program three times a week, while the others continued with their normal lives, as a control.

The exercisers were asked to “challenge” themselves during the calisthenics, completing as many of each exercise as they could in a minute, before walking in place, and then moving to the next exercise.

After six weeks, all of the volunteers returned to the lab for follow-up testing. And, to no one’s surprise, the exercisers were more fit, having upped their endurance by about 7 percent, on average. Their leg power also had grown slightly. The control group’s fitness and strength remained unchanged.

“It was good to see our expectations confirmed,” says Martin Gibala, a professor of kinesiology at McMaster University, who oversaw the new study and, with various collaborators, has published influential studies of intense interval training in the past.
“It seemed obvious” that this kind of training should be effective, he says. But “we now have evidence” that brief, basic body-weight training “can make a meaningful difference” in fitness, he says.

The study was small and quite short-term, though, and looked at the effects only among healthy young people who are capable of performing burpees and jump squats. “Some people may need to substitute” some of the exercises, Dr. Gibala says, especially anyone who has problems with joint pain or balance. (See the Standing 7-Minute Workout for examples of appropriate replacements, in that case.)

But whatever mix of calisthenics you settle on, “the key is to push yourself a bit” during each one-minute interval, he says.

Here is the full 11-minute workout used in the study, with video links of each exercise by Linda Archila, a researcher who led the experiment while a student at McMaster University.
  • 1 minute of easy jumping jacks, to warm up
  • 1 minute of modified burpees (without push-ups)
  • 1 minute of walking in place
  • 1 minute of high-knee running in place
  • 1 minute of walking in place
  • 1 minute of split squat jumps (starting and ending in the lunge position, while alternating which leg lands forward)
  • 1 minute of walking in place
  • 1 minute of high-knee running in place
  • 1 minute of walking in place
  • 1 minute of squat jumps
  • 1 minute of walking in place, to cool down
sauce An 11-Minute Body-Weight Workout With Proven Fitness Benefits
 

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I subscribe to the Ryan Leech Connection and spend a couple of hours a week doing drills outside my house on lunch breaks from work. I've been re-doing the bunny hop course recently and two weeks ago decided to mix in a few sets of kettlebell swings to make the most of a limited break. I noticed an improvement in my bunny hops after the first set and have since been including 3-5 sets of swings into each practice session.
 

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I subscribe to the Ryan Leech Connection and spend a couple of hours a week doing drills outside my house on lunch breaks from work. I've been re-doing the bunny hop course recently and two weeks ago decided to mix in a few sets of kettlebell swings to make the most of a limited break. I noticed an improvement in my bunny hops after the first set and have since been including 3-5 sets of swings into each practice session.
Everything helps,I haven’t done kettlebells in my training in a while but I should add them again.
 

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Discussion Starter #432
We do a 3 to 4km warm up run before our evening home gym workout. Last evening the snow plow guy gave us the thumbs up. Yesterday's strength workout was backsquats followed by a HIIT .

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Just did one of my fav p90x workouts last night after a LOOOONNNGGG hiatus due to some tendonitis issues. Amazing how fast we lose it nowadays....lol. My upper body is way sore. It was a heavy pushup workout, embarrassingly, had to do most of them on my knees. Didn't even have pullups. UGGGHHH. Never going to let it go again. Have been riding a ton, but definitely need to work on the rest of it too.
 

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My wife still works out with her trainer (virtually) 2x per week. I am lazy and just pedal for the most part.

My low-profile jelly belly is telling me I need to start doing something more so going to break out my exercise ball and start doing a 20-30 minute thing a couple times per week.
 

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Just did one of my fav p90x workouts last night after a LOOOONNNGGG hiatus due to some tendonitis issues. Amazing how fast we lose it nowadays....lol. My upper body is way sore. It was a heavy pushup workout, embarrassingly, had to do most of them on my knees. Didn't even have pullups. UGGGHHH. Never going to let it go again. Have been riding a ton, but definitely need to work on the rest of it too.
I liked the P90X, some of the most inspirational fitness videos ever.
Never stop riding as your primary focus. I’m not a fan of intervals but smashing it up hills makes a short ride more of a work out.
 

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I liked the P90X, some of the most inspirational fitness videos ever.
Never stop riding as your primary focus. I’m not a fan of intervals but smashing it up hills makes a short ride more of a work out.
10 years ago I was really into it. Friend of mine got me into it and was even in one of the infomercials. I was younger(obviously) but was much lighter and in better shape when I started. I am currently about 215 and got down to 165 doing it and about 3% bf. I was like a coiled spring...lol. Id do the workout and then go run 6 or 7 miles (or ride 10 to 15) after it was done. Alas, life has caught up, but working to get back.

I actually have started to get an affinity for long climbs over the last few years. Used to hate 'em but at least don't mind them now. I did The Mount Washington climb in 2019 (4700 feet in 7.5 miles) and we were supposed to do mount evans last summer (roadie stuff of course). I am slow but can generate some watts...lol, so I just keep churning. My goal is to get faster on the climbs to keep up with all my skinny buddies, but I do realize I need to get back after the upper body stuff too. I've been dealing with terrible tendonitis in my elbow the last year and just now feel like I can get back after some of that.

I love to ride and tolerate the other stuff. Don't think I'll ever give that up. Still trying to get 40 some miles (trainer and mtb) before sunday to start the year off with 200 miles. I also have a bunch of hunting/hiking prep I need to start here in a few months so that will take some time as well.
 

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I'm 51yrs old and have been lifting weights since I was 14yrs old. Obviously I don't lift the same amount of weight as when I was younger: bench 340lbs, squat 450lbs. As I got into my forties, I realized I need to change so I don't hurt myself, no need to be that strong and pushing heavy weights.

At 51, I'm happy with what I call the 225lb club, meaning being able to bench/squat/deadlift 225lbs for a rep of 10. Some weeks I go heavy, maybe up to 275lbs and other weeks I do alot of reps. Like others have said, every week I change it up and have be doing that for years. I hope to be able to stay in this 225lb club through my sixties but I imagine at some point I'll have to re-evaluate the 225lb club.

With Covid and gyms closing down. I ended up buying a home gym. I've stayed away from a home gym my entire life, because I thought it would be hard to stay motivated to work out at home. I was wrong, turns out, for me it was way easier working out at the home gym and I rarely miss a workout!
 

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10 years ago I was really into it. Friend of mine got me into it and was even in one of the infomercials. I was younger(obviously) but was much lighter and in better shape when I started. I am currently about 215 and got down to 165 doing it and about 3% bf. I was like a coiled spring...lol. Id do the workout and then go run 6 or 7 miles (or ride 10 to 15) after it was done. Alas, life has caught up, but working to get back.

I actually have started to get an affinity for long climbs over the last few years. Used to hate 'em but at least don't mind them now. I did The Mount Washington climb in 2019 (4700 feet in 7.5 miles) and we were supposed to do mount evans last summer (roadie stuff of course). I am slow but can generate some watts...lol, so I just keep churning. My goal is to get faster on the climbs to keep up with all my skinny buddies, but I do realize I need to get back after the upper body stuff too. I've been dealing with terrible tendonitis in my elbow the last year and just now feel like I can get back after some of that.

I love to ride and tolerate the other stuff. Don't think I'll ever give that up. Still trying to get 40 some miles (trainer and mtb) before sunday to start the year off with 200 miles. I also have a bunch of hunting/hiking prep I need to start here in a few months so that will take some time as well.
That’s awesome and very inspirational! I started using a Polar HRM watch over 14 years ago. It was the S710 model and it would upload to my pc where I analyzed my rides on Polar Personal Training software. That was pre-Strava pre-Garmin and about the only other platform was Training Peaks that you would need to email them your files. I didn’t go that route but have kept with using my Polar watches and Strava when that started.
I started my year with my first 100 miler and plan to do that at least 1x a month. In addition I ride my local mountain trails daily, either 1000ft in 2.5miles or 2000ft in 6m. I’ve only missed 3 days of riding this year and trying to pick up my pace and see if I can get closer to my times from 10years ago.I also want to get some epic long climbs in and work up to a 10,000ft day.
Besides my Garmin Edge and Polar Vantage watch I’ve also considered a power meter to start analyzing my watts. Anything to keep me riding daily.
 
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That’s awesome and very inspirational! I started using a Polar HRM watch over 14 years ago. It was the S710 model and it would upload to my pc where I analyzed my rides on Polar Personal Training software. That was pre-Strava pre-Garmin and about the only other platform was Training Peaks that you would need to email them your files. I didn’t go that route but have kept with using my Polar watches and Strava when that started.
I started my year with my first 100 miler and plan to do that at least 1x a month. In addition I ride my local mountain trails daily, either 1000ft in 2.5miles or 2000ft in 6m. I’ve only missed 3 days of riding this year and trying to pick up my pace and see if I can get closer to my times from 10years ago.I also want to get some epic long climbs in and work up to a 10,000ft day.
Besides my Garmin Edge and Polar Vantage watch I’ve also considered a power meter to start analyzing my watts. Anything to keep me riding daily.
Nice job! Ive actually been tracking my weight and workouts on an excel spreadsheet since 2007. Still do in addition to logging on Strava and Garmin connect. Can't give it up. Kinda fun to go back and look at the old data and notes from some of those days.Ive been way heavier and way lighter since then. Kinda crazy. I wish I could ride (outside) every day, but have started using Zwift and we also have a Nordictrak S22i bike, so can take advantage of workouts and spin classes. I also do a virtual ride once a week on zwift with a buddy from Boston. We video chat and push each other pretty hard. He's a better climber and I push on the downhills. Really want a smart trainer to get actual watts(the S22i has a powermeter though) I hit 835 estimated for a few seconds last night, but my average is definitely increasing. Need to work on the endurance stuff. I am reasonably fast in the sprints for a fat guy and have several, what I call "fat guy KOM's" locally (over 200 lbs). I tell everyone I am the fastest old fat guy on a mountain bike in Tulsa....lol. I know that's not true but it's fun....and anything to keep me riding semi-daily. Just gotta throw in the strength workouts now. My new pull up bar gets here today so that will help.
 
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