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The one of the best ways of fighting the effects of aging is fitness - strength training being an important component.


Studies have shown that moderate body mass is strongly correlated to longevity as well as other benefits (improved bone health, lean muscle mass etc. )

Recent study I found:
Strength training helps older adults live longer | Penn State University



Share your personal experiences or articles related to strength training and lifting. Has it helped with your riding?


The Fountain Of Youth flows with iron.
:)
 

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Every year when the time changes I switch gears and start lifting.Usualy try to get 4 days week lifting and swim one day and use weekends to ride or do cardio on trainer or ellipitical.64 and still feel pretty good.Usualy this time of year can do 55 pushups in a minite and 15 wide grip pull ups.
 

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Share your personal experiences or articles related to strength training and lifting. Has it helped with your riding?
Yes. 2 to 3 times a week I lift (Mondays/Wednesdays/Fridays) - usually 30-45 minutes each session (Friday is all core work). Squats/Deadlifts/Push Press/Bench Press/Box Blasts/Curls/Knee Extensions/Lunges/Planks/Power Clean/Rows/Crunches/Dumbell Arm Snatch/Glute Bridge/Stretches - all divided up throughout the 3 sessions per week.
 

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I do Crossfit 3 times a week. Most of my riding is on trails with a fat bike. Besides improving my leg strength, the improved upper body strength has really improved my bike control.
 
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I'm not as dedicated as some, but getting to the gym once or twice a week really helps. I've had a number of injuries, and lifting has helped with recovery. Bike James .com has lots of good advice that's mountain bike specific. Single leg deadlifts, kettlebell swings and goblet squats are 3 exercises that seem very effective for me.
 

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Absolutely. I lift regularly, and even though I'm no body builder, I do find that having extra strength makes me more durable when I hit the dirt, which happens on occasion.
And to be honest, I need a little muscle on my rather thin body.

I tore up my shoulder while lifting a week back and now require rotator cuff repair. The doc was surprised at how much strength and mobility I still had considering the severity of the damage. I attribute that to regular lifting. I also expect, perhaps unreasonably, that it will help speed up my recovery.
 

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After 2 rotator cuff surguries i have quit doing stuff that hurt,Military presses,incline bench,stuff that is above sholder height
 

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The men in my family generally are in the ground before they hit 70.

The exception was my uncle. He played football semi-professionally until his late 20s (but was actually a dentist). He gave up smoking at 40, restarted swimming in his 50s, gym in his 60s, had a scandalous affair with a much younger woman when he retired, and walked miles most days, not as exercise, but rather than use his car. I gave him a bicycle when he was about 85 but he gave that up after a couple of years because he reckoned he was too dangerous for other road users.

He swore by a daily dose of cod liver oil for his joints. He wasn't averse to a dram or two, and danced until 4am when we had his 90th celebration ceilidh.

He was nimble and sharp as a tack until his final few weeks, and we buried him at 97.

I can still remember the scorn his brothers poured on him about giving up the smoking, and his regular exercise.

I reckon he had it all worked out.
 

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For the longest time I thought strength training in the gym was a waste of time. You know, just get the miles in....that's where it counts. Ahh but my wife is angym rat, and she finally got me into the gym a few years back, and she set me up with a trainer. One off-season of gym time and I saw results,..... better times, better climbs, and looking better to my wife. A double win. Since then I have continued in the gym....all year, but more structured in the off season, which is about 4 months here in Idaho. No trainer any more, but I will use bodybuilding.com , which has some great instruction videos. Check them out.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
goodstuff!

I registered for the crossfit open. First workout starts tomorrow. 17.1 workout consists of:

dumbbell snatches 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 reps
burpee box jump-overs 15 reps after each snatch set


There is a 20 minute cap... planning to do the snatches at the prescribed weight and hope I get through it!

Strength training has helped my overall fitness , recover from injury and it's helped make me a stronger rider
 

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Riding is only one of my passions. I also paddle and backpack. Weights definitely help with those.

I primarily do body weight exercises since my goals are muscle endurance. I do my bodyweight routine first, then supplement with free weights. Today I did core -- 450 situps and back exercises in sets of different variations, then followed up with dumbbells. Tomorrow is pull up day, then pushups and chest. So each muscle group is worked 2x /week. I am 62, so I am not going to make the ladies swoon with my shirt off no matter how much iron I push. I do have a goal of the 1000 pushup challenge (1k pushups in one calendar day, any combo of reps and sets). Working up to it, currently my body says 'no mas!' at around 700.

the weather has been pretty wet for the last 2 months, not much riding. So the treadmill is getting a lot of use.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Splitting firewood with a maul.

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That's a tough chore!


I did some trail maintenance (snipping branches and moving deadfall etc) on weekend and I shoveled the driveway by hand twice this winter. I can't say I enjoyed either task :) but at least sections of the trail were rideable and the driveway didn't turn to ice... it's all good.
 

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For interest only.

This is the physical fitness standards for wildland firefighters from the Forest Service, BLM, National Park Service, et al.

Light : Duties mainly involve office-type work with occasional field activity characterized by light physical exertion requiring basic good health.
1 mile hike, flat terrain in 16 minutes.

Moderate: Duties involve field work requiring complete control of all physical faculties and may include considerable walking over irregular ground, standing for long periods of time, lifting 25 to 50 pounds, climbing, bending, stooping, squatting, twisting, and reaching. Occasional demands may be required for moderately strenuous activities in emergencies over long periods of time. Individuals usually set their own work pace.
2 mile hike, 25 lb pack, in 30 minutes.

Aduous: Duties involve field work requiring physical performance calling for above-average endurance and superior conditioning. These duties may include an occasional demand for extraordinarily strenuous activities in emergencies under adverse environmental conditions and over extended periods of time (general front line firefighter).
3 mile hike, 45 lb pack in 45 minutes.

Additional for Category 1 crews, i.e. Hotshots, Helitack:
In addition to arduous above:
1.5 mile run in 10:35 or less
25 pushups in 60 seconds or less
40 situps in 60 seconds or less
Chinups based on body weight
>170 lbs = 4 chinups
136-169 = 5
110-134 = 6
<110 = 7
Testing is consecutive with 5 minute rest inbetween.

Smokejumpers:
In addition to Category 1 above:
7 pullups regardless of weight
Packout test: 110 lb pack, level terrain 3 miles in 90 minutes

No adjustments for age or gender for any of the standards. Must pass test annually.

I was not a SJ. I was hotshots and helitack, but I did pass the SJ test. The packout test was the hardest for me. As I grew older the knees became my limiting factor. I passed every year until I retired at age 50, but it was a lot harder in my 40s than my 20s.
 

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I spent so many purposeful years in the gym as an athlete through H.S., College, and a while after that for years I hated being in there. I thoroughly believe in the work and it's benefits but I compensated for years with riding, hiking, xc skiing, etc. Getting older (and years of sedentary work) wreaks havoc on the body. Now in my FIRST YEAR OF RETIREMENT, I forced myself back to the gym. I walk/hike 50 minutes to the gym, force myself through 20-25 minutes of (mostly machine) work and then hike home.
The benefits (5 months now) have been noticeable.

There are some that love it. I don't. I get through it by never resting, I go from a 'set of push' to a 'set of pull' sometimes repeating exercises but always alternating upper and lower body pairs so that by 25 minutes, I'm done. The hike home is outstanding - sometimes at -20C!

Can't wait for the riding season, the weights will probably reduce down to 1x/week or less but it is refreshing to have the energy and overall fitness back.

Sixty this year and getting stronger!
 

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2x/week for now and will cut back to once per week as the riding volume and intensity increases.

Check out 'Fast After Fifty' by Friel.

Loss of muscle mass and decreased aerobic capacity at our age....
 
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