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Gabe.....
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Aermet steel............:madman: This stuff is super hard (drilling for a vent hole was almost impossible for me) but what is even stranger is when heated it moves all over the place. Heat one side and the other end lifts off......I tried to use some for a CS bridge this evening and ended up having to remove it (and use some good ole Versus) cause it just would not sit still. That's my strangest stuff, anybody have anything else that they find hard to work with? :D

Aermet is an ultra-high strength type of martensitic[1] alloy steel. The main alloying elements are cobalt and nickel, but chromium, molybdenum, and carbon are also added. Its exceptional properties are hardness, tensile strength, fracture toughness, and ductility.[2] Aermet is weldable with no preheating needed.[3] Aermet is not corrosion resistant so it must be sealed if used in a moist environment. It is a registered trademark of Carpenter Technology Corporation.
 

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Nah.

Grind 'em in. I'm pretty sure that's how the old full-Aermet bikes were all mitered. No reason you couldn't just get a small circular grinding bit for the H20 bosses.

That said, I thought Aermet (around for almost 20 years?) was long dead as a bicycle material. Are people actually trying to use it again?

-Walt

TimT said:
Sold carbide bits turned real slow with plenty of cutting oil.

Tim
 

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Gabe.....
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1,182 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Walt said:
Grind 'em in. I'm pretty sure that's how the old full-Aermet bikes were all mitered. No reason you couldn't just get a small circular grinding bit for the H20 bosses.

That said, I thought Aermet (around for almost 20 years?) was long dead as a bicycle material. Are people actually trying to use it again?

-Walt
I did manage to get a hole drilled but the bit was toast............As far as the tube material "availability" goes, it's all who you know and if that person wants to let a few go from their secret stash.........;)
 

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Mate no offense, but you shouldn't be doing anything with Aermet.
 

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Oh, what a poor misunderstood material ;)

Suffice it to say, there were a number of builders who freely experimented with Aermet frames to the customer's ultimate frustration, however, the material does have many positive qualities and can build a fine frame when the materials constraints are fully understood and adhered to.

I'm curious how many current builders have truly worked with this material in multiple applications to form their opinion or is it purely based on a few poor techniques from long ago?

r
 

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Aermet wasn't some mystical metal. It wasn't that dissimilar to the current crop of 953 or XCR.

It was though hardened to a much higher level than we are typically used to working with and I am torn as to whether this is worthwhile or not. You add the difficulties of working with it (grinding miters, typical stainless issues, costs etc) and you had a material that not a lot of people understood and was as expensive as the other exotics.

Aermet is a low carbon low nickel stainless and is not completely rust resistant. I do have to warn....If you are not experienced with stainless and do not have grinders and carbide tooling and backpurging and all that other good stuff one would have with Ti production don't muck with this stuff. It is not forgiving at all and you will end up in a world of hurt.
 

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Not to mention that most of it was half a millimetre thick.
 

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Aermet is a BRILLIANT material.........if you can get it too work with you. My experience with metalurgy isn't bike related, so this is second hand.

I quote "Aermet is like a Jack Russel terrier on Crack. Lots of work, won't behave...but when it does it's all the more special"

My projects are more pedestrian (haha!). But I've been given a bunch of steel from a friend that I think fell off a truck (probably said NASA on the side!!!). I use Diamond hole saws from Lee Valley, and they stuggled with that batch. No idea what it was, it welded easy but was so hard it should have been brittle.

Good luck with the aermet. You may need to invest in alcohol ingestion system to keep you and your tools from overheating.
 
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