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Interesting...

CampStove

Heavy, but potentially eliminates a few other kit items. As I told the guy who sent me the link: Might be a worthy tradeoff until it's been raining that day.

Seriously, though...what's your stove set up? Penny alcohol? Old skool white gas? IsoButane mini (Snow Peak, etc), IsoB heat exchanger (Jetboil, etc)? Fire?

I've been running an old Snow Peak GigaPower Manual. Never got with liquid (kerosine, etc) fuels for some reason. Thinking I'll add a wind shield and call it good, or pony up for a newer Jetboil (Sol Ti).

Tea is a staple in our diet, and we've also begun to take to those pricey dehyd meals. I'm thinking quick trailside tea breaks. Jboil is impossible to beat for boiling time without going to the bigger MSR Reactor.

Whatcha got?

Mike
 

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since 4/10/2009
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problem with wood burners is that they're the first to get the axe when fire regs start coming down. last summer, ALL cooking was prohibited the fire danger was so high.

I have a Primus Alpine Lite canister-top stove that's my go-to for most trips. If I'm going short and light, I have a supercat alcohol stove I'll use. I have been tempted to replace it with a more efficient (but still fairly simple) alcohol stove. I also have a Primus Multi-Fuel that does winter and car camping duty. It's a liquid fuel stove that can also use a canister in a remote canister setup. It's very nice, but it's too heavy for most 3 season use. If I was doing international traveling this would be the stove I carried because it can burn almost anything.
 

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primus eta power gas.
msr simmerlight.
msr whisperlight int.

depending or where and how long I will be travelling.
I am experementing with wood. Not sure if I want that as mine only heatsource.
 

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That BioLite does look interesting, I like the USB charging feature alot. I've been looking at the JetBoil ones but haven't purchased one yet. Currently using a car camping stove that I wouldn't want to carry any long distances.
 

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I have a MSR Pocket Rocket and old WhisperLite that I use for backpacking.

I hope to (finally) build a Penny Alcohol stove before Summer. I have an old-skool Heineken keg can that I liberated from a Southwest airlines flight a couple years ago.
 

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The BushBuddy or Bushcooker is my choice outside the winter, when not too much rain is forecasted. It is light and works well. A few Esbit tables provide a good backup.

 

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Riding or Drumming
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Optimus Crux has been great. Stores nicely due to it's folding design. Also utilizes 'heat-sink' design ala Jetboil for crazy efficiency.

 

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I still use my old MSR Whisperlite that I have had for about 20 years, from my mountaineering days in the Alps - still going strong. Lightweight, and packs small, only problem is great care required around tents. Good thing about petrol is that it can be easily got anywhere in the world.
 

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Hi my name is Vik and I am a stove addict...;)

I've got:

- 20yr old MSR XGK-II [hot as hell and no simmer - multi-fuel]
- MSR Dragonfly [hot as hell and some simmer - multi-fuel]
- MSR Simmerlite [pretty hot, quiet and you can simmer easily - white gas only]
- MSR Pocket Rocket [hot, quiet canisters only]
- Trangia [hot, quiet alcohol only]

I use the Dragonfly for extended trips where I'll be cooking a lot. You get a lot of mileage out of white gas or gasoline and resupply is easy.

I use the Pocket Rocket when I'm flying and need a stove. No mess and stove head doesn't make security folks freak out. Just need to score a canister or two when you land.

I use the Trangia for trips where weight/size matter and I can get away with one fuel bottle. It's small/quiet and clean. Works fast enough for tea and boiling water for dehydrating meals.
 

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since 4/10/2009
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Hi my name is Vik and I am a stove addict...;)

I've got:

- 20yr old MSR XGK-II [hot as hell and no simmer - multi-fuel]
- MSR Dragonfly [hot as hell and some simmer - multi-fuel]
- MSR Simmerlite [pretty hot, quiet and you can simmer easily - white gas only]
- MSR Pocket Rocket [hot, quiet canisters only]
- Trangia [hot, quiet alcohol only]

I use the Dragonfly for extended trips where I'll be cooking a lot. You get a lot of mileage out of white gas or gasoline and resupply is easy.

I use the Pocket Rocket when I'm flying and need a stove. No mess and stove head doesn't make security folks freak out. Just need to score a canister or two when you land.

I use the Trangia for trips where weight/size matter and I can get away with one fuel bottle. It's small/quiet and clean. Works fast enough for tea and boiling water for dehydrating meals.
LOL - I wouldn't call a pocket rocket quiet. less noisy, perhaps, than the XGK, but it's not a "Rocket" for nothing. All my compressed gas stoves are loud. My little canister top Primus can be turned down pretty low and it's not terribly noisy then...but for boiling water with the heat cranked up - just as loud as my expedition stove.

The only ones I would call quiet are unpressurized alcy stoves.
 

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LOL - I wouldn't call a pocket rocket quiet. less noisy, perhaps, than the XGK, but it's not a "Rocket" for nothing. All my compressed gas stoves are loud. My little canister top Primus can be turned down pretty low and it's not terribly noisy then...but for boiling water with the heat cranked up - just as loud as my expedition stove.

The only ones I would call quiet are unpressurized alcy stoves.
I've rec'd dirty stares from folks at the next campsite when I was cooking dinner with the Dragonfly. We'd become accustomed to the sound, but as we walked away from our picnic table and then back towards it we had to agree it sounded like a small jet plane was taking off...;):madman:
 

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is buachail foighneach me
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Just started using a homemade double wall wood stove. Soup can and a Spaghetti-Os can. Upper holes on the inner can for an efficient burn. One handful of twigs will melt snow down to 18-20 oz of water.
 

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My MSR Dragonfly is like the proverbial jet taking off, especially when everyone is still sleeping and you want to eat.
I have a couple Biolites on order, been following this product for over a year now and had hoped it was going into production last spring. Regardless, it's not really about another stove option for us, but more so for third world countries.
 
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