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Discussion Starter #1
Kona A - blue single speed full suspension bike

Marzocchi Marathon S - grey

Avid BB7 in the front

Avid V in rear

Sram "Carbon" Levers

Shimano Saint Cranks

Bullseye Wheels

Thomson Post

Terry Saddle

Easton Monkey DH bars

Keep a look out!

This belongs to Steve End at Hank & Frank Bikes in Lafayette.

Thanks
 

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gimme friction
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Damn, that's weak

Not too many of those around, should stand out on ebay and craigslist.

In fact, there was a Kona A listed for sale on craigslist several weeks ago...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
chudaman said:
Was it stolen before 12/31/05? What trail/city was it stolen from? What size is it?

I think it was stolen before 12/31 - I think closer to the 26th or so...

It is a 19"

It was stolen from in from of Hank and Frank Bike Shop in Lafayette.

I can provide the serial number, if needed.

It should have a National Bike Registry decal on it as well.
 

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imridingmybike said:
I think it was stolen before 12/31 - I think closer to the 26th or so...

It is a 19"

It was stolen from in from of Hank and Frank Bike Shop in Lafayette.

I can provide the serial number, if needed.

It should have a National Bike Registry decal on it as well.

Thanks for the info, i was wondering because i have been in touch with the craigslist person in santa cruz that is selling a 19" blue Kona "A", i foget the rest of the specs but I am still hoping to go check the bike out...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
chudaman said:
Thanks for the info, i was wondering because i have been in touch with the craigslist person in santa cruz that is selling a 19" blue Kona "A", i foget the rest of the specs but I am still hoping to go check the bike out...
Cool.

If that is the same craiglist ad posted by Dan'ger - I don't believe the bike is a match. If you can get the serial number though, it would be good to compare the two.

Thanks! IRMB
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Found!

imridingmybike said:
Kona A - blue single speed full suspension bike

Marzocchi Marathon S - grey

Avid BB7 in the front

Avid V in rear

Sram "Carbon" Levers

Shimano Saint Cranks

Bullseye Wheels

Thomson Post

Terry Saddle

Easton Monkey DH bars

Keep a look out!

This belongs to Steve End at Hank & Frank Bikes in Lafayette.

Thanks
UPDATE - The stolen Kona A was recovered last week by Walnut Creek PD who were in Hot Pursuit of a suspect matching a description of someone "bad".

When the PD ran the serial number through their database it matched the police report made when the bike was stolen.

Steve got his bike back - with a few "modifications" - but nevertheless.

Moral of the story - MAKE A POLICE REPORT!

Trivia: close to 50% of all stolen bikes eventually end up in police property rooms.

Tip: Making a police report enables the recovering PD to ID the bike and find the owner!
 

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Feeling a little taller
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imridingmybike said:
UPDATE - The stolen Kona A was recovered last week by Walnut Creek PD who were in Hot Pursuit of a suspect matching a description of someone "bad".

When the PD ran the serial number through their database it matched the police report made when the bike was stolen.

Steve got his bike back - with a few "modifications" - but nevertheless.

Moral of the story - MAKE A POLICE REPORT!

Trivia: close to 50% of all stolen bikes eventually end up in police property rooms.

Tip: Making a police report enables the recovering PD to ID the bike and find the owner!
Too cool. Glad to hear it. Does he want to sell it? It's my size...
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Dan'ger said:
Too cool. Glad to hear it. Does he want to sell it? It's my size...

I don't know, but you and I are having dinner with him next week at Bo's - so you can ask him then!

I feel a bit compelled to spew more info on bike theft & recovery, as the subject is near and dear - given my prior line of work (No, I wasn't a bike thief, if that's what you were thinking!).

In my previous job I recovered and returned many,many stolen bikes to their owners. Brian Le Hereux was the first - an early 90's Specialized. Then Carol something, then some Professor dude - the more I returned, the less I remembered - my point is I know a bit about getting bikes back to their owners.

Hundreds of thousands of bikes are stolen each year in the US. Very few every get returned to their owners - but a huge percentage do get found and recovered by law enforcement.

When law enforcement recover bikes involved in crime, they are required to run the serial number through the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) database. If there is a match, then it is possible for them to locate the owner and return the bike.

How would there be a match? The owner must first file a police report! Then/When the bike is found and the serial number run - police can locate the owner.

This is not a perfect system for the following reasons:

Only bikes that have been reported stolen end up in NCIC.

NCIC tracks the information given to them. If the owner moves - NCIC doesn't know that - therefore if the bike is found subsequent to being stolen - police can't do anything - as they would have incorrect info. Garbage in, garbage out.

What happens then? The bike goes to auction and/or stays in the police property room forever.

What if the bike is found "ditched" and no crime is involved? It doesn't get entered into NCIC by the recovering officer - it goes straight to the property room waiting... sometimes 90 days, sometimes longer - then off to the auction.

The vast majority of stolen bikes are never reported stolen by the owners for many reasons. Apathy, lack of sufficient info etc. Therefore when the bike is recovered by PD, nothing can reasonably be done to find the owner.

Bike Registration
California has a bike registration program whereby the bicycle owner can log bicycle and owner information into a local database - usually city or county run - and put a California Bicycle Registration sticker on the bike.

Scenario: Good Samaritan in Reno, NV finds a bike "ditched" somewhere with a CA Bicycle Registration sticker on it. What can the person do? The sticker does not state which city or county the bike is registered with. Nothing can be done other than to call every city and county in the state!

There is no state wide bicycle registration database - but the sticker only reads California Bicycle Registration. Confusing, huh?

With close to 50% of all stolen bikes ending up (sooner or later) in police property rooms - how is the recovering precinct supposed to locate the owner with this patchwork of resources?

My recomdation is to do all of the above and more - before you need to!

Register your bike via every method available to you.

When your bike is stolen, report it!

Etc, etc...

Just my .02.
 

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Yeah, like Chuck said....

Record your serial number!!! Write it (them in most cases) on a strip of paper, put the paper in a film container and put the container in your freezer. A police report doesn't do a lot of good without a serial number.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
velocipus said:
Yeah, like Chuck said....

Record your serial number!!! Write it (them in most cases) on a strip of paper, put the paper in a film container and put the container in your freezer. A police report doesn't do a lot of good without a serial number.
Registering it guarantees record of you serial number - plus it gives the recovering party one more tool to find you. Remember - it only end up in NCIC if it's involved in a crime.
 

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imridingmybike said:
I don't know, but you and I are having dinner with him next week at Bo's - so you can ask him then!

I feel a bit compelled to spew more info on bike theft & recovery, as the subject is near and dear - given my prior line of work (No, I wasn't a bike thief, if that's what you were thinking!).

In my previous job I recovered and returned many,many stolen bikes to their owners. Brian Le Hereux was the first - an early 90's Specialized. Then Carol something, then some Professor dude - the more I returned, the less I remembered - my point is I know a bit about getting bikes back to their owners.

Hundreds of thousands of bikes are stolen each year in the US. Very few every get returned to their owners - but a huge percentage do get found and recovered by law enforcement.

When law enforcement recover bikes involved in crime, they are required to run the serial number through the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) database. If there is a match, then it is possible for them to locate the owner and return the bike.

How would there be a match? The owner must first file a police report! Then/When the bike is found and the serial number run - police can locate the owner.

This is not a perfect system for the following reasons:

Only bikes that have been reported stolen end up in NCIC.

NCIC tracks the information given to them. If the owner moves - NCIC doesn't know that - therefore if the bike is found subsequent to being stolen - police can't do anything - as they would have incorrect info. Garbage in, garbage out.

What happens then? The bike goes to auction and/or stays in the police property room forever.

What if the bike is found "ditched" and no crime is involved? It doesn't get entered into NCIC by the recovering officer - it goes straight to the property room waiting... sometimes 90 days, sometimes longer - then off to the auction.

The vast majority of stolen bikes are never reported stolen by the owners for many reasons. Apathy, lack of sufficient info etc. Therefore when the bike is recovered by PD, nothing can reasonably be done to find the owner.

Bike Registration
California has a bike registration program whereby the bicycle owner can log bicycle and owner information into a local database - usually city or county run - and put a California Bicycle Registration sticker on the bike.

Scenario: Good Samaritan in Reno, NV finds a bike "ditched" somewhere with a CA Bicycle Registration sticker on it. What can the person do? The sticker does not state which city or county the bike is registered with. Nothing can be done other than to call every city and county in the state!

There is no state wide bicycle registration database - but the sticker only reads California Bicycle Registration. Confusing, huh?

With close to 50% of all stolen bikes ending up (sooner or later) in police property rooms - how is the recovering precinct supposed to locate the owner with this patchwork of resources?

My recomdation is to do all of the above and more - before you need to!

Register your bike via every method available to you.

When your bike is stolen, report it!

Etc, etc...

Just my .02.
MMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmMMMMmmmmmmmmmmmm Brisket!
 
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