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I’ve been talking with the neighbor who lives across the street and he says he sees LOTS!!!! of bikes move out of the creek. They all have cellphones he says and has seen the transaction. The car will drive up and the bike thief will come out of the creek with a stolen bike and the guy pays and drives off in a matter of minutes.
He has a surveillance camera and this is what he captured today. The camp is on the other side of the fence and there’s no reason to drive down this road. He says this isn’t a neighborhood car and doesn’t belong. Can’t tell it’s my bike from the photo.
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Doesn't look to be it from the tires, but geo looks kinda similar ... I'd think a professional would have a van, but not shocked the camp is hooked in with a pro ... As far as being a thief it's a smart business model to have a bunch of heroin addicts steal bikes for you. My guess is they get paid $200 (or whatever) a bike, then the guy behind the operation hires a runner to take it to a chop shop. It's worth looking into but not a huge priority for local police, and some junkie isn't gonna run to them or anyone else. Just sucks, time will heal and at the end of the day, nobody got hurt and you just file it under the **** happens file and move on.
 

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I will break it down for you. You said you hope the thief overdoses with the extra money they should get for such a nice bike. I pointed out that you were hoping they get more money for the bike than most would get in hopes they overdose. Are you able to track that line of thought?

You are of course assuming that the thief is a heroin addict, and if so, that said addict knows the difference in value between an Atherton, Giant, Trek or other mid to high end bike. More likely, if indeed the thief is a junky, they have no clue what they stole, other than it looks nice and they can get some money for drugs in exhange for it. Or do you think most junkies spend their free time cruising MTBR, Pinkbike, and Bikerumor to keep up on the latest and greatest as well as used market pricing?
LOL I'm impressed you took the time to explain what was perfectly clear the first time around! And yeah, if it's a junkie it's a fixed price no matter the bike. They could tell a nice bike from a Walmart bike the way I can tell a quality pair of high heels over Payless, but they have no clue what they had in their filthy little paws that's for sure. I'm guessing the tires (which looked sick w that frame btw) cost more than what they got for it.
 

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I have often thought about this…

Every second vehicle on the road where I live is a truck with a tailgate pad that never comes off (apart from winter months, and even then, it stays on for some). But I’m lucky to live where I do. I have to believe it is not representative of the rest of the world, or else we would have a safe, quick, aesthetically pleasing solution along the lines you described, as an OEM option when buying a truck. Despite biking being the raison d’être for a lot of us, I can only conclude that we mountain bikers remain a microscopic market overall. If volume and profit were there, this option would exist.

I don’t leave my bikes in my truck unattended, no matter what locking system is being employed. A cordless orbital grinder will foil any security attempts in 30 seconds or less. I also don’t leave my bikes in my truck in my driveway for more than 10 seconds when I get home after a ride, or before I leave for one. My home security system is connected to my overhead garage door, and I have a doorbell camera and one of these installed in the garage:


This is in a small, gated, cul de sac neighborhood in residential Canada populated largely by retirees who stare out their windows all day and note the comings and goings of everyone who enters my neighborhood. And even with all these measures, I still feel somewhat vulnerable.

I hate living in fear but this is what it’s come to. Either take precautions or assume some degree of risk.

As remote as it might be, if I see an Atherton way up in my tiny part of the world, I will be politely asking where it was bought. Hopefully we will all do that. And if I conclude that someone bought it for a deflated price, when they knew or ought to have known it was stolen, I’m calling the authorities and messaging the OP. Those bikes are exceedingly rare. I didn’t even think they were in production.
Good post. I'm in PA and kid not I've been keeping my eyes peeled too. And agreed about bike security. Old ones I've left in parking lot of it's a quick run in/out, but different story with my new one. I could have frozen groceries and an infant in my backseat, the bikes comes off and in before anything or anyone else!!
 

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Agreed, it's not perfect. You can loop thru the rack and hitch, make it take longer than a minute or so using a noisy grinder, and if it's parked where there are security cameras too they may decide to leave it. And IMO this is only good for short periods of time in busy places. Those cable locks take a couple seconds to cut using a silent tool, so cables are only good for keeping honest people honest, they won't even slow down a thief by more than a few seconds.
Yeah i think some people are underestimating the sophistication of a professional. They operate in teams, there's always surveillance and a driver, and like some have said, with the proper tools they're in and out 30 seconds max no matter the lock. Not saying that's what went down with the Atherton, but just making the point that the best security is never leaving it unattended. If it gets swiped from your garage, at least your homeowners will cover it.
 

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⬆ = (y)
I'm almost a proponent of having mods delete any post that promotes someone turning themselves into Liam Neeson in "Taken." But, hey, we're all adults, we can make our own (stupid) decisions. "Taken" is a bad comparison, however, as I wouldn't equate my kids to a nice bike.

Ok, so if you need the story to share at campfires about how badass you are, then you do you. But the last thing I want is for my tombstone to have this silly-ass phrase written on it: "Died valiantly trying to get his replaceable material object back."
For the record, I never suggested OP bring any weapons or try confronting anyone. I also don't know how off-the-beaten path this camp is, and recommended only doing it if he feels comfortable doing so. I've volunteered in those camps so perhaps I have a more jaded view. If course there's risk, but they're not animals and there's usually "bosses" in those camps that controls things. If you have a little bit of street smarts it's easy enough to figure out, but the last thing that camp wants is for the cops to mess with them, and you can guarantee that's exactly what would happen should something go down with an outsider. I know some below have suggested weapons (which I interpreted as a joke) so perhaps I'm not being targeted, but just wanted to clarify if so.
 

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Aside from the obvious suck ass position the OP is in. This thread delivers some serious entertainment. I forgot how much fun you NorCal boys can be, I haven’t dropped in here for awhile.
 

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For the record, I never suggested OP bring any weapons or try confronting anyone. I also don't know how off-the-beaten path this camp is, and recommended only doing it if he feels comfortable doing so. I've volunteered in those camps so perhaps I have a more jaded view. If course there's risk, but they're not animals and there's usually "bosses" in those camps that controls things. If you have a little bit of street smarts it's easy enough to figure out, but the last thing that camp wants is for the cops to mess with them, and you can guarantee that's exactly what would happen should something go down with an outsider. I know some below have suggested weapons (which I interpreted as a joke) so perhaps I'm not being targeted, but just wanted to clarify if so.
What do you mean “there’s usually bosses in those camps that control things”?
 

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Evolutionsverlierer
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The chain and lock I linked above can't be cut with bolt cutters AFAIK, you really need a grinder.
Saw a battery powered bolt cutter that brings 11 tons of cutting pressure to the table and it says hinders in the description of the chain which is not confident inspiring even it might be just lawyer talk.

I like the idea of a build tail gate security but in the end I am with the ones who never leave their bikes out of sight.

Good luck to the OP.
 

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Something like this may take a couple minutes of very loud grinding...

And to up the ante even more, a through-hardened chain instead of just case-hardened [by the foot even!]:
 

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Evolutionsverlierer
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And to up the ante even more, a through-hardened chain instead of just case-hardened [by the foot even!]:
Nice CS service that they send you a 60’ chain if you leave the field blank instead of contacting you.
Guess they figured out that people with a lot of security needs tend to be forgetful. 😉
 

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Yeah i think some people are underestimating the sophistication of a professional. They operate in teams, there's always surveillance and a driver, and like some have said, with the proper tools they're in and out 30 seconds max no matter the lock. Not saying that's what went down with the Atherton, but just making the point that the best security is never leaving it unattended. If it gets swiped from your garage, at least your homeowners will cover it.
There are really two groups of thieves, opportunists and professionals. The first are stopped by a good quality lock and chain (i.e. Abus or Pewag). The second can be slowed down, but even an Abus 12ks or Pewag 12mm can be cut in 30 seconds or less with a grinder or torch, which professionals use. Using a second chain buys you extra time and hopefully makes the exposure time great enough they pick an easier target, the key word being hopefully.
 

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And to up the ante even more, a through-hardened chain instead of just case-hardened [by the foot even!]:
I don’t believe through hardening is needed and in fact makes the chain more brittle and subject to certain types of attacks. The 12mm Pewag and Abus already cannot be cut with bolt cutters, but both are easily cut with a grinder or torch (there is no chain, cable, or u lock that can’t be cut in this manner).
 

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In a very eventful day 20 years ago in the bay area, we had bikes on a roof rack. Parked at a Target (in San Jose), went in to buy sodas. Came out. Front wheels gone. Two players walking down the street with the bike front wheels. Cop stops them. I mean you can't make this stuff up. We wander over, grab the wheels and the cops' card so we can attend the arraignment (never called). Had a boss day riding up on Mt Tam. Later, drove the bikes into the barrier at the hotel parking garage. The y-bike deserved it, and my FSR got a new triple crown fork out of the deal, so yeah, great day.
 

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I’m still trying to wrap my head around a boss of a homeless camp. They quit society’s rules of working and having a boss and go homeless only to be bossed around again in their new environment.
 
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