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I had been running Trail Kings with the Black Chili and pretty happy with them, but had some Specialized tires with Gripton that I had taken off a new bike, so I thought I would try since they felt super tacky. First put a Butcher up front and left the Trail King in the rear, rode over this slime covered creek and the front just went. Played around a minute there just trying to see the difference in compound and it was pretty clear the Black Chili held on much more than the Gripton. Then I put a Ground Control out back, almost busted my arse on a section that I just breezed over on the Trail King.
So curious, with all the new compound options, which is the stickiest? I'm happy with BC, but is the something I am missing? One of my favorite trails is greasy rocks and roots that never seem to dry, so I need something just south of hot tar. I've tried Addix and liked it fine, too other than the tire out back was pretty much done after a single ride, but that supposedly is fixed. Tried an Ardent....great on hard, not so much on the slick stuff. I also kinda like the stiffer sidewalls, I know some folks complain, but I am a Clyde and the more flexible walls seem to leave me less than confident at lower pressures. Going to try an XR4 Team next
 

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Softer tackier rubber may not be best on slimy rock and roots. I find I do better with harder knobs with new sharp edges that can better cut through the slime.
 

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Schwalbe Addix Ultra Soft. Pretty much won't get softer than that, and if you did you'd buy tyres weekly.
That reminds me of Michelin comp 24.1s...when I'd get about two weeks of DHing out of them and they were done.
 

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I had been running Trail Kings with the Black Chili and pretty happy with them, but had some Specialized tires with Gripton that I had taken off a new bike, so I thought I would try since they felt super tacky. First put a Butcher up front and left the Trail King in the rear, rode over this slime covered creek and the front just went. Played around a minute there just trying to see the difference in compound and it was pretty clear the Black Chili held on much more than the Gripton. Then I put a Ground Control out back, almost busted my arse on a section that I just breezed over on the Trail King.
So curious, with all the new compound options, which is the stickiest? I'm happy with BC, but is the something I am missing? One of my favorite trails is greasy rocks and roots that never seem to dry, so I need something just south of hot tar. I've tried Addix and liked it fine, too other than the tire out back was pretty much done after a single ride, but that supposedly is fixed. Tried an Ardent....great on hard, not so much on the slick stuff. I also kinda like the stiffer sidewalls, I know some folks complain, but I am a Clyde and the more flexible walls seem to leave me less than confident at lower pressures. Going to try an XR4 Team next
Conti's Black Chilli varies by model, the DH and agressive tyres are softer than their trail tyres.

The SE4 is grippier than the X4, thought the caracass isn't as supple

The Ardent is most likely a hard compound. In the Maxxis range you'd want one of 3C variants - they have a few e.g. MaxxTerra and MaxxGrip

There's lots of good feedback about the new Schwable / Addix
 

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The Addix Ultra Softs are probably the tackiest out there in the market right now (barring any unseen prototypes). They don't last very long but they are really grippy.

Combine that with wider profiles like the size 2.6 that Schwalbe uses (which is pretty much closer to a 2.8 on other brands), then you will probably have a lot more than you need.
 

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That reminds me of Michelin comp 24.1s...when I'd get about two weeks of DHing out of them and they were done.
I remember a skifield opening up one year for a round of our National DH champs, Slow Reezay and Super Tackys had just come out. People were ruining them after a day up there.

I think I saw a video on Pinkbike this week showing a mechanic with an analogue durometer, however I think it was to make sure they weren't using an older (hardened?) tire.
 

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OP, if you want the stickiest compound I've experience with, the Maxxis MaxxGrip is about it, but to get it you also have to purchase a tyre with the DH casing, which, if you're a clyde, might not be such a bad thing. Friedn bought one of the Assegai tyres when they first came out for his Ripmo, said it had unbelievable grip compared to the previous DHF 3C MaxxTerra, was like yeah, ok, then when we got to the bottom and were loading up the bike to head home I felt it and could not believe just how soft it was, only other rubber compound I could say it reminded me of was that on a go-kart wet tyre, felt soft like putty.

I would certainly hope that's not the case, as in the tech specs foe each tyre, they both have listed 60a/51a as the compound. Do you have personal experience with both version of the tyre? Curious as I've been considering these 2 as well.

Conti's Black Chilli varies by model, the DH and agressive tyres are softer than their trail tyres.

The SE4 is grippier than the X4, thought the caracass isn't as supple

The Ardent is most likely a hard compound. In the Maxxis range you'd want one of 3C variants - they have a few e.g. MaxxTerra and MaxxGrip

There's lots of good feedback about the new Schwable / Addix
 

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I think of it like this. Slicks work best on hard surfaces; like car and moto race slicks. Big knobs work best on soft surfaces where they can dig in. Soft compound works best on hard surfaces. Car and moto slicks are really soft and tacky, especially warmed up. Harder compounds work better for big knobs that depend on mechanically hooking up with the soft surfaces.

There are compromises for everything in between. I figure that for slippery rocks and roots, more smaller hard knobs work best. They have a more sharp edges to cut through the slime rather than surf over it. Soft compound doesn't really help IMO because it lessens the ability of the edge to cut through the slime, and the slime prevents the stickiness from sticking. Of course slippery roots will still be slippery, just maybe a little less so.

FWIW: I have more experience on road and off-road motos than on mtbs.
 

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OP, if you want the stickiest compound I've experience with, the Maxxis MaxxGrip is about it, but to get it you also have to purchase a tyre with the DH casing, which, if you're a clyde, might not be such a bad thing. Friedn bought one of the Assegai tyres when they first came out for his Ripmo, said it had unbelievable grip compared to the previous DHF 3C MaxxTerra, was like yeah, ok, then when we got to the bottom and were loading up the bike to head home I felt it and could not believe just how soft it was, only other rubber compound I could say it reminded me of was that on a go-kart wet tyre, felt soft like putty.

I would certainly hope that's not the case, as in the tech specs foe each tyre, they both have listed 60a/51a as the compound. Do you have personal experience with both version of the tyre? Curious as I've been considering these 2 as well.
I concur with this quote fully. IMO Maxxis does a great job of this. Also, I'm 220, so hard casing with the soft knobs has always been the best combination feel and grip for me. The confidence going into a corner is absolutely absurd.
 

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I had a bit of a google to see what the durometer was of the Maxxis tires.
Super Tacky 42a
Slow Reezay 40a
The MaxxGrip have Super Tacky covered side knobs.
I think the Slow Reezay was just too fragile, I remember side knobs hitting riders in the face!
 

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I would certainly hope that's not the case, as in the tech specs foe each tyre, they both have listed 60a/51a as the compound. Do you have personal experience with both version of the tyre? Curious as I've been considering these 2 as well.
LyNx.

Forgive me, I stand corrected. I was remembering a previous generation.

Here's an interesting article, with great comments
https://nsmb.com/articles/bontrager-xr4-and-se4-team-issue-tires/
 
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