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Fo' Bidniz in da haus
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to steal text from the 29er Man of the Year (Walt from waltworks), here is some useful info:

Steel is heavier than either titanium or aluminum. Because steel is also a lot stronger than aluminum or ti, you can use less of it to build a bike frame that has acceptable characteristics. The thinner sections of tube walls I use for steel bike frames are half a millimeter thick! That's not something you can do with other materials. The result is that I can produce a lively, strong, and lightweight frame at a reasonable price.

Titanium is a great material. Ti is strong, light, and rides well. Best of all, it doesn't corrode. But there's a downside, of course, and that downside (and the reason I don't work with titanium) is cost. Ti frames would not be any lighter or ride any better than a steel frame I can build at around half the cost to the customer. The only real advantage of ti is its corrosion resistance - but if you take decent care of your steel bike (and I apply a liberal amount of rustproofing before it goes out the door) it'll last you 30 years. And it is true that truly high-zoot titanium framesets can be built 1/3 of a pound or so lighter than normal steel frames - but the butted ti tubes required mean that the frame alone is going to cost $2,000+. Steel bikes rule just as much and cost less.
 

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FoShizzle -
I think what the above qoute from Walt is true, but don't you think that a straight gauge ti frame would be much less likely to ding than a thin walled steel bike?
I happen to ride a steel hard tail, and am currently considering getting a Walt Works frame built, so I am a big fan of steel bikes, but I have always thought a straight gauge Ti frame might be the ultimate for mountain bikeing (forgiving ride, really tough, and no corrossion).
Of course it's way more expensive, and with the straight gauge there isn't much saveings in weight either.
 

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Fo' Bidniz in da haus
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17,282 Posts
travisbean1558 said:
FoShizzle -
I think what the above qoute from Walt is true, but don't you think that a straight gauge ti frame would be much less likely to ding than a thin walled steel bike?
I happen to ride a steel hard tail, and am currently considering getting a Walt Works frame built, so I am a big fan of steel bikes, but I have always thought a straight gauge Ti frame might be the ultimate for mountain bikeing (forgiving ride, really tough, and no corrossion).
Of course it's way more expensive, and with the straight gauge there isn't much saveings in weight either.
i think if cost was the same, I would go Ti. Walt himself on his site says Ti frames are killer. The only real downside is the cost as far as I am concerned. So for a set amount of $ I would go steel since the bike with the steel frame would of course have better components than a Ti based bike for that same amount. I am sure one day I will get Ti....
 
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