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Snow Dog
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Funny you mentioned hockey sticks. I play hockey and have used wood and todays composite sticks. In the 90's the even made them from aluminum but that trend didn't stick around.
I never got into the aluminum ones either. I used the Sherwood Paul Coffey model for years and years. They are hard to find any more. We even have a Perani's here in town and they don't regularly carry them.

I've never heard of anyone complaining about their bike being too light but I suppose maybe it's happened.

Do you mean a rigid bike as in no suspension? Plenty of those, and carbon frames can be built to be supremely stiff/ rigid.
not so much the bike being light, but being "substantial", I guess while i ride it...

yeah...no suspension. I figured there were ,but i really have never delved into the world carbon fiber
 

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digging up an old thread that has not had any traffic in a long time is considered a bad practice unless you have something new to add or ask. your post didn't ask any specific question or add any new information, just a plug for your website. threads that have more interest naturally move to the top of the list. it is allowed but it is annoying and rude. you won't make any friends when you do this, and you might get banned.

using this forum to post links to your commercial website, especially in this way, is misleading. if you want to advertise your services, pay for an ad to support this website.
 

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Hi Mack, I appreciate your thoughts, and thank you for your suggestions as well. Obviously you are one of the PRO on this platform and know more than me but I think calling someone spammer without knowing is also bad practice. I hope you don't mind. I am a new member of this platform and writing on my blog so my intention was to share my article that's it. Moreover, I didn't notice that this thread is very old. I will delete this and if you have some time would love to get your feedback about my blog. Thanks :)
 

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apparently a moderator agreed with me because your previous posts were deleted. time to give up.

here's what you ought to do: start a new thread and say up front that you are writing a blog and you'd like feedback. the way you did it before felt like you were trying to sneak it in, as if you had new information to share.
 

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Thank you very much Mack. I really appreciate your suggestions and criticism and I was really impatient and I agree with all the things that you have said and really appreciate my friend. I hope you don't heart in my words. I will do this what you have just said. Thank you again Mack.
 

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not enough rubber yet!

rode steel for 30+ years and depending on how its put together, beats almost anything. with fat tires now I have alu and hard to tell difference except my slu climbs like a boss....its geared...my SS is and always will be steel for the (flow) it gives.
 

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The differences in ride quality between steel, aluminum and carbon stand out on bikes with skinny high pressure tires, like traditional road bikes. The fatter the tires and lower the tire pressure, the less difference frame material makes to ride quality. Add suspension and it's nill, IMO. Eight years ago I still had steel, aluminum and CF road bikes and an al FS mtb. Now I just have CF road bikes and al and CF FS mtbs. I'll stick with CF on the road bikes but am completely happy with al mtbs.

Agree that corrosion with a good steel bike is not really an issue. High quality finishes and internal anti rust treatment basically solve that. You can do an internal anti rust treatment yourself if the bike doesn't come treated.
Disagree with this. Have owned about 4, aluminum hardtails, and 4 steel hardtails. All of the steel hardtails are smoother, and I can get into a flow with them, on trails. That doesn't happen, getting rattled around, on an Al frame. The steel frames, are simply less harsh, regardless of other factors. They soak up bumps and vibrations, much better. Also, steel can be very fast, with the high-end stuff, and good geometry. Shiiet, my 94 GT Bravado LE, and 2005 Jamis Dragon Team, are very quick sprinters, with great handling. Love steel frames, the best material imho.

It is true, larger diameter tires, and lower psi numbers, do help. Nevertheless, a harsh frame, is gonna be a harsh frame, at the end of the day. This is magnified, on hardtails, since they can be unforgiving. Even small vibrations will start to add up, especially on 2 hour+ rides. Hence, why I sold my 96 GT Zaskar, and 98 Stumpjumper. They would kick my azz, (especially my neck). Got rattled around too much, screw that. Kept a 2003 Specialized Rockhopper, that frame doesn't bother me as much, for some reason, (adore that bike).
 

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slow
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I think there are so many other variables in play that frame material alone is not as important as it is made out to be. I currently have 3 hardtails (steel, aluminum, carbon) set up nearly identically and with the same geometry, and if there is a difference in ride quality at all between them, it is negligible at best.
I've had great mountain bikes made from 4130, Prestige, Logic Prestige, 853, etc over the past 35 years, but I don't mind a decent aluminum bike.
I found this video about frame material ride comfort interesting:
 

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On a rigid fork there is a “feel” difference from steel to aluminum, just a little nicer “feeling” on the trail, not convinced it rides easier or faster though.
 

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I think there are so many other variables in play that frame material alone is not as important as it is made out to be. I currently have 3 hardtails (steel, aluminum, carbon) set up nearly identically and with the same geometry, and if there is a difference in ride quality at all between them, it is negligible at best.
I've had great mountain bikes made from 4130, Prestige, Logic Prestige, 853, etc over the past 35 years, but I don't mind a decent aluminum bike.
I found this video about frame material ride comfort interesting:
Good point, I realize, it is a big generalization, and very simplistic, to claim that: "A steel frame will ride this way", or "An aluminum frame will ride like this". That is making big generalizations. I'm just speaking from my experience, of over 15 years mountain biking. Maybe I have gotten, "the bad luck of the draw", with Al hardtails. Plus, I am attracted to "fast looking bikes". A red anodized Zaskar, and a yellow M2 Stumpjumper, lol. Plus, i used to buy them, without really testing them, from Craigslist, lol. They would look good, would look fast, the parts were working, and if they were ready to ride, I'd buy em. (Just riding up and down the parking lot, to make sure they work, lol). The Zaskar and the Stumpjumper, were both race, Al hardtails. Hence, there would be a good chance, that they could ride harsh.

It is true, there are much more complex, factors to this question. Physics, geometry, etc. For example, chainstay length, and chainstay design, can have a big effect, on the ride of a hardtail. The tube diameter of the frame, the thickness of the tubes, etc, etc. There is alot of complex physics going on. I mean, I wish I could understand, why my Al Rockhopper, is a softer ride than the GT Zaskar. But that would be a very long, complex answer, full of complex physics scenarios, and differential equations, lol. Will check out that video though, thx for the link.
 

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slow
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It is true, there are much more complex, factors to this question. Physics, geometry, etc. For example, chainstay length, and chainstay design, can have a big effect, on the ride of a hardtail. The tube diameter of the frame, the thickness of the tubes, etc, etc. There is alot of complex physics going on. I mean, I wish I could understand, why my Al Rockhopper, is a softer ride than the GT Zaskar. But that would be a very long, complex answer, full of complex physics scenarios, and differential equations, lol. Will check out that video though, thx for the link.
I sold GT bikes new for several years and part of their claim to fame was being stiff, due primarily to their triple triangle construction. The smaller rear triangle is naturally going to flex less than a larger rear triangle while the additional material and attachment points of the seat stays just forward of the seat tube / top tube junction add rigidity to the main triangle.
 
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