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weekend warrior
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36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
..pita to clean when i keep worrying about water getting into the inside tubes.

Places of where water can enter:
1) Seattube collar!!!! My seatpost is filled with water droplets whenever i pull it out
2) Bottle cage bosses
3) V brake bosses
4) Headtube gussets
5) Seat stay gussets
6) Chain stay gussets
7) Bottom bracket

How do you guys prevent it, AND at the same time soap up bike?

Share your experiences and tips!
 

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Eff U Gee Em
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159 Posts
Re: steel is real

What NCF said, products like framesaver are designed for this. I personally have never used it, and don't know anyone that has. In practice, I never had any issues with my steel frame for the five years I used it.

All your frame tubing is interconnected, leave your seatpost out once in a while so the frame can air out. Take out the bottom bracket at least once a year, or after deep stream crossings, and liberally lube the frame threads upon reinstall. Grease your seatpost too. You could put a dab of silicone around the bottle cage screws and the chainstay/seatstay vent holes.

Oh, and you could use a wet rag instead of the garden hose.

Hey, I just realized I still have a steel bike- my beater/commuter/city bike. I don't use it much anymore, but I've had it for almost 10 years now and at one point rode it almost every day for a year and a half to commute- regardless of weather. Frame is still fine, but I should probably follow my own advice and pull the bb and seatpost and regrease everything.
 

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weekend warrior
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36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm considering framesaving.

Is it safe to assume that after frame saving, the layer of protection will guarantee that water wouldnt be able to reach the exposed metal at all?

Something to the extend of ..maybe close to 100% rust proof?

And how long will the layer last / how often to I have to redo the process of framesave?
 

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You wanna go ridin?
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297 Posts
I just starting using Framesaver so no long term experience. When you apply and let dry it creates sort of a waxy like barrier on the metal. You have to re apply a coupla times a year from what I've read.

Some things I do

- I thread water bottle screws with telfon tape. Also used plumbers putty. Both seem to work.

- have my seatpost collar 180deg opposite the notch in seattube. My seatpost is shimmed and between the top of the shim and bottom of seat collor I have an O-ring. Seems to work.

-I check seat tube periodically and if wet I pull seat, hang upside down on my bike stand inside to dry.

One other thing is my bikes all have sealed tubes to the only opening is the seat tube and everything else is sealed.



edit:Seatpost o-ring is between shim and seat tube. It is cinched down some when I put seat post clamp on.
 

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There's no app for this.
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5,369 Posts
Try this...

ride bike, get it dirty, wash bike, remove seat and seat post, turn bike upside down and drain any water inside the frame & BB area. That ought do it. Repeat often.

Plan B: research all the terrible accidents caused by rusted steel bike frames, and discover there aren't any, so no worries.

Jim
 

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You wanna go ridin?
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297 Posts
JimC. said:
Plan B: research all the terrible accidents caused by rusted steel bike frames, and discover there aren't any, so no worries.

Jim
Excellent point Jim and I agree. The only trepidation I have is many of the custom steel builders nowadays are using thinner tubing to get the frames light vs the more common steel frames that will last a lifetime. Just something that came to my attention when I bought a Soulcraft and read the stuff Sean had to say about rust and thinner walled steel frames.
 

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Framesaver is the way to go. Apply it once (I usually do 3 coats over 3 days) and you can go years without ever worrying about it. Be sure to start with a completely stripped, clean, and dry frame. It is messy, so do it outside if you can. You DO NOT need to reapply it a couple times a year - only ever 5 years or so.
 

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Good point also...

Not a steel rider so I didn't realize the thinner walls...makes sense.

However...framesaver is essentially an external spray if I understand it, so surface rust will be perhaps avoided. It's always the internal stuff you can't see that sinks you ship, so to speak.

One could try to saturate the internal tubes and then drain any leftover framesaver out, or use olive oil or similar, or even WD-40 which helps evaporate the H20.

Lastly, one can make a jiggle valve for the BB: remove BB assembly and drill a small hole in the bottom centre, then insert a piece of spoke with the nipple inside the BB, and clip off anything hanging out the bottom by over 1" or so. Replace BB assembly. that homemade valve will drain any water that may accumulate inside the BB area from down tubes etc.

I still employ the upside down method for my aluminum bike, to protect the BB cartridge and so forth.

Anyhow, hope that helps, Jim
 

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JimC. said:
Not a steel rider so I didn't realize the thinner walls...makes sense.

However...framesaver is essentially an external spray if I understand it.
NO. You spary it inside all the tubes, coating everything internally.

JimC. said:
Lastly, one can make a jiggle valve for the BB: remove BB assembly and drill a small hole in the bottom centre, then insert a piece of spoke with the nipple inside the BB, and clip off anything hanging out the bottom by over 1" or so. Replace BB assembly. that homemade valve will drain any water that may accumulate inside the BB area from down tubes etc.
What? Why in the hell would you drill out your frame when you could just pull the seatpost and turn it upside down? Not to mention the aesthetics and noise of having a spoke sticking out of your BB.
 

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There's no app for this.
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Thanks for the

terse correction of my understanding of framesaver, and for those of us that ride in wet rain forests and soak our bikes post ride to remove all the mud and loam, a jiggle valve can be helpful. That's why the hell we might want one.

Jim
 

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You wanna go ridin?
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bad mechanic said:
Nope, do it once and forget it.
Here's where I read to apply coupla times a year:

Soulcraft's Website FAQs page

http://www.soulcraftbikes.com/faq.asp

Its an interesting read either way

I'm worried about rust on/in my Soulcraft frame. What should I do to prevent it?

It can never be said too many times: Steel rusts. Soulcraft frames are steel. Soulcraft frames can rust. We've spent a lot of time figuring out ways to make our frames more rust/corrosion resistant: sealed tubes, forward-facing seat tube slots, stainless braze-ons, double-coat powder paint, rust inhibitor inside the seat tubes, and o-rings seals for your seat post, to name a few. But, there needs to be a certain amount of responsibility on your part to help make your frame last.

The single worst thing we see is corrosion inside the seat tube. Yes, water will get inside there and if you ride in the rain or there is significant moisture being flung off your rear tire and onto your seatpost, then here's what you need to do: After wet rides, remove your seat post and turn your bike upside down to drain and dry. Pay attention and watch how much water runs out. You'll never not drain it again. Let it dry for at least a few hours before you grease and re-install your seatpost.

After every 2 or 3 times you do this you should re-apply some sort of rust inhibitor like LPS #3 or Weigle's Frame Saver. Spray the stuff liberally into the seat tube, then wrap a rag around the antenna you broke off your neighbor's Impala. Spray the rag with rust inhibitor, then insert the antenna with the rag on it into the seat tube and push up and down to coat the walls of the tube. Use a flashlight to see if you've got everything covered and to periodically check things out. For dry climates re-apply once every 4-6 months. We use the LPS stuff here and every frame has a bunch of this sprayed into the seat tube when it leaves the shop. This will keep you safe for a while but after that you're on your own.
To help you even further, every Soulcraft frame comes with a little black o-ring which looks like a rubber band. It's supposed to go around your seat post and be slid down against the top of the seat post clamp. We've seen these o-rings sitting a bit above the seat clamp on some customer's bikes and if there is any gap between the o-ring and seat clamp, you may as well not have the o-ring on there. The purpose of the o-ring is to create a seal around your seatpost to help keep water from seeping into your seat tube. Make sure there is a little grease on the o-ring so it creates a better seal and keeps the o-ring pliable. A hot tip is to spin the o-ring as you push it down against the seat clamp. This will help it "seat" better. If you don't have an o-ring or lost it or whatever, just go to your local hardware store or auto supply and ask for a #20 o-ring. That should do it. You can actually do this for any bike you own. Also, if you are using a 27.2 seat post shim (supplied with most Soulcraft frames), make sure the shim slot is positioned slightly offset with the frame slot (put shim slot at 11o'clock). This will prevent water from seeping into the seat tube.

Sweat is another thing to watch out for. Obviously you're going to sweat on your frame, hopefully while riding it. Some people have what we call "toxic sweat" which can eat its way right through even the most durable paint. If you ride your bike on a stationary trainer you are asking for trouble. The sweat just drops straight down and sits on, and more specifically under, the tubes of your frame. Take whatever precautions you must to keep sweat off your frame on a stationary trainer (we are currently out of stock of the Flash Dance headbands). Make sure you wipe the frame down afterwards with some type of cleaner like Simple Green and make sure it's dry! Same goes for general riding. You'll get way more life out of your frame if you wipe it down after a ride and get all the sweat off. Problem areas are any sharp edges like the top and bottom of the head tube, braze-ons, and anywhere you see bare metal. Keep in mind that if you ever call us saying your frame has rusted to the point of needing tubes replaced, we will not warranty it. Sometimes things rust despite your best efforts but you need to take care of it right away or call us for the best way to deal with it.

A tip for scratches that go down to bare metal is to visit the touch-up paint section at your local auto parts store or model/hobby supply. They have a wide selection of colors and it's your best bet to match the powder paint on your Soulcraft (powder paint is baked on at 400 degrees so there isn't any touch-up paint available). A free t-shirt to anyone giving me part #'s for paints that match Soulcraft colors. Any by "match" we mean "looks just like".

While we would like to say that we have never seen a broken Soulcraft frame, it happens once in a great while. The great thing about steel is that is gives you a lot of warning before it breaks, but you need to look for those warning signs in the form of small cracks at or near any joints. So check around the welds of the frame and fork for small cracks. If small cracks are left to widen, they could over time allow a catastrophic failure to occur. Bottom line; check your equipment at least once a month if you ride a lot.

For all you folks with Soulcraft frames that have singlespeed Slider/Rocker Dropouts, throw a little "blue" LocTite 242 on the threads of the mounting bolts. This will keep them snug longer. Also, do not use anything bigger than a 160mm rotor with our frames or forks. They are not designed to deal with the bigger torque loads and brake geometry of the bigger rotors.
 

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Soulcraft is talking about applying it just to the inside of the seat tube, and not to the whole frame. I think even Soulcraft's recommendation is overkill since Frame Saver is very hard stuff, the seat post is abrading it, and not all that much moisture gets past the seatpost anyway.
 

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You wanna go ridin?
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297 Posts
bad mechanic said:
Soulcraft is talking about applying it just to the inside of the seat tube, and not to the whole frame. I think even Soulcraft's recommendation is overkill since Frame Saver is very hard stuff, the seat post is abrading it, and not all that much moisture gets past the seatpost anyway.
Yeah you're prolly right. Like I said before Soulcraft frame tubes are all are sealed cepn the seat tube. I had my cross bike for a coupla years and just decided one day to check and yeah there was a cup or so of water in it-I was suprised as I don't ride in the rain too much. Drained it, dried it, and framsavered it but now I check frequently and haven't had any get in in the last year or so and the frame saver is good to go.

My new used Soulcraft option 3 did have a decent amount of surface rust in the seat tube. Bought from a guy in CO and bike was ~ 6 years old. Cleaned it and Framesavered it and it too is good to go now.
 

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I'm just messing with you
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moishlashen said:
Soulcraft frame tubes are all are sealed cepn the seat tube.
My WTB is built the same way. So tempting to drill holes through the top and bottom of the BB shell, but so likely that I'd run the drill bit right out the side of my seat tube. :madman:

I still remember when I first got the frame and went to spray it with framesaver, but had no openings to spray it into.
 

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In Transit
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My Fisher is 13 years old and triple butted cromoly with no rust issues. Ridden regularly for the first five and recently brought out of retirement. I would just avoid riding on salted roads and powerwashing your frame.
 
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