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Baby Bear is in the house
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm selling my aluminum hardtail MTB in order fund a steel rigid SS bike build to be used for 80% on-road commutes, 20% light XC trails.

Some time ago I got a cheap Zoom suspension seat post to replace the Cannondale rigid aluminum seat post to soften up things out back. Yes, it's heavier than the rigid, but it proved quite useful (even on the road with 1.5" slicks).

Since I have two perfectly usable seat posts, my question is, should I keep the Zoom, to be used for my upcoming steel SS project bike, and just sell the rigid alu together with my old bike? Or will this be considered a "sacrilege," and not keeping up with the true spirit [whatever that means] of the "steel is real" phenomenon? Will I be losing out on the true feel of steel if I use the suspension seat post? Or should I sell the Zoom with the old bike and keep the rigid alu for the new steel frame?

Opinions please...
 

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No-Brakes Cougar
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I would tend to lean more towards what you really want, rather than worry about breaking some sort of perceived cycling taboo. If weight reduction is more important to you then go with the alu seat post. Steel may give a less harsh ride than aluminum, but it's not smooth like butter either (after all, what is?). I say, if the Zoom works for you then keep it! If you change your mind later, you're just going to have to go out and buy another one anyway. The only negative I can come up with on a sus seatpost is that it can bounce when you pedal, but it sounds like you're already satisfied with it.
 

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Frt Range, CO
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I run a Thudbuster LT on my Al hardtail and a Thudbuster ST on my steel rigid. Not really concerned about what others think....
 

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Baby Bear is in the house
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
pursuiter said:
Not really concerned about what others think....
Gary the No-Trash Cougar said:
I would tend to lean more towards what you really want, rather than worry about breaking some sort of perceived cycling taboo.
I guess my post did come out to seem like I was more concerned about keeping up with a certain "culture." Thanks for putting things into perspective. I should've focused on just asking "Will I be losing out on the true feel of steel if I use the suspension seat post?" I mean, I know it won't be suspension, but will the steel feel that much less harsh compared to the alu (this will be my first steel frame) enough for me to ditch the Zoom and have a lighter bike to boot? 'Cause while weight reduction is not a major concern, I still don't want to lug around useless lardage (the pot calling the kettle black :rolleyes: )
I'm not saying the steel frame will make up for the susp. post, just wondering how "wondrous" the steel will feel, and if it's something I can live with (rigid post, that is).

I guess the only way I'd find out is when I do get to ride the steel frame.

I'll likely keep the Zoom. I can always buy a rigid seat post if I get tired of the suspension.

Thanks gents :thumbsup:
 

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Frt Range, CO
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2,576 Posts
r1Gel said:
...I'm not saying the steel frame will make up for the susp. post, just wondering how "wondrous" the steel will feel, and if it's something I can live with (rigid post, that is)....
IMHO, the "feel" difference between steel and Al is overblow here. On a 3lbs road bike frame, there's a difference, on a 5.5lbs mountain bike frame not much.
 

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No-Brakes Cougar
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pursuiter said:
IMHO, the "feel" difference between steel and Al is overblow here. On a 3lbs road bike frame, there's a difference, on a 5.5lbs mountain bike frame not much.
+1. The difference is kind of overrated.
 

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Baby Bear is in the house
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
rodar y rodar said:
Off topic:

R1gel, did you ever end up getting those cruiser pedals? If so, how are they doing for you?
Hi. Unfortunately, no. All I find in my LBSs are the plastic ones. I've given up searching for it [for now ;) ]

Thanks for asking.
 

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Randomhead
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I think the average cyclist needs to have a self image boost so that they don't worry about what other people think so much. Let me just say, you are all wonderful people, and you can do what you want when equipping your bike.
 

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anyone else smell that?
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cbchess said:
I am running a steel frame with a carbon seat post that has a bit of extra flex and I am running a Sprung Brooks saddle the Champion Flyer
http://www.wallbike.com/championflyer.html

I like the benifits of ALL of these for taking the "sting" out of the trails and road.
y'all know if there is a weight limit to those springs? i'd love ot have one, but i'm afraid id just squish them.
 

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Brooks is quality

jgsatl said:
y'all know if there is a weight limit to those springs? i'd love ot have one, but i'm afraid id just squish them.
I ride a Brooks Champion Flyer...I'm somewhat(lol) of a Clydesdale at about 240 lbs...260 when I got my Brooks. I can't feel the springs "squish" under me. They do absorb a tremendous amount of shock on bumby trails/roads though.
 

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Gary the No-Trash Cougar said:
+1. The difference is kind of overrated.
+1

Steel has its benefits with skinny tires. If you're riding an Al frame with tires over 1.5", the difference is small. With fatter tires, I welcome the stiffer frame. A rigid steel fork may be more important than the frame itself if the terrain is bumpy.
 

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Map Maker
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Ovaries on the Outside
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On the other hand, I think it is bs if you do anything that fails to fall within the accepted norm. SS? Rigid? Suspension Seatpost? Don't be ridiculous. Get that seatpost outa here and fall in line.
 
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