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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, I installed the stans no-tubes on my Easton XC one wheelset. I used Specialized 2-bliss tires. During install it took quite a while to seal the sidewalls of the tires (not the beads, I had no leaks at the beads at all). I finally got it sealed and had no leaks. I only used one scoop of sealant. The tires held air fine for about 3 days, now they are starting to lose pressure. Is this normal? Do I really have to re-seal them this often? How long should I be able to go without adding more sealant or going through the sealing procedure (all the tire shaking).
 

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If you can here your sealant splashing around when you shake your wheels your fine. You will still have to check your tire pressure before your ride. I loose 10 psi in the rear in 2 days but it stops about there. the man reason for me to go tubeless was No Pinched flats and thorn flats.
 

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Every tire is different....

I've had tires that took 5 days or more to finally seal up the sidewall. Just depends on sidewall thickness and the rubber compound used. Some compounds are more porus than others so it takes them longer to seal up. As for air loss, no tire, not tubeless, not tubed, nor a converted tire will hold air indefinately. It's not uncommon for a tubeless conversion to loose between 3 and 5 psi over a three day period. Tubed tires usually loose an average of 3 to 5 psi a week, and UST tires on UST hoops loose about 5 psi every couple of weeks more or less. There are some setups that do better, it just depends, again, on the tire.

Now as for how often you should have to add sealant, that depends on the climate, tires, etc. Usually you should add one scoop ( 2 ounces) of sealant every three to six months. This is to keep it fresh as it does dry up inside the tire over time. The hotter the weather in your area the more often you will have to add. Also once you've got the tire sealed, you won't have to reseal it again unless you pull the tire off and remove the coating of latex that builds on the inside of the tire. To add sealant is simple if you have the removable vlave cores (stans stems usually do) and a 2 ounce injecter. Just deflate the tire without breaking the bead, remove the valve core and inject fresh sealant. If you don't have an injecter or removable cores, simple deflate, crack the bead on one side and open it up enough to pour in sealant. Reinflate and shake a bit and the bead should reseal almost immediately. As long as you did not disturb the latex coating inside the tire it shouldn't have to "reseal".

As a side note: I know that Stans recommends once scoop of sealant for a standard XC type tire. But for initial setup I always use 2 scoops. This allows for a tire that may take a long time to seal up. Even if it takes a week to seal, you still have plenty of sealant left to do the job on punctures etc. From there I'll add a scoop about every 6 months. And I'll dump it out and completely replenish the sealant about every third time.

So, yes it is common and normal for converted tires to loose air.

Good Dirt
 

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Yep Two scoops at least when a new non tubless tires are used it will weep until the casing has sealed. I sometimes have to pull 5 to 10 thorns out each ride. I have to replenish my stans everymonth in these conditions. With no thorns every 2 to 3 months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The Specialized 2bliss tires I am using are not true tubeless tires. They have a special bead, but the rest of the rubber seems to be pretty porous. I can pump the tires up to 35psi and within a few hours they drop down to about 15psi, but don't go any lower. I find that if I take the wheels off the bike and lay them on their side they don't lose very much pressure. I guess I will try adding another scoop of sealant. How hard is it to remove the valve core with pliers? I don't want to damage the valve core, and I don't have a removal tool right now.
 

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ljsmith said:
The Specialized 2bliss tires I am using are not true tubeless tires. They have a special bead, but the rest of the rubber seems to be pretty porous. I can pump the tires up to 35psi and within a few hours they drop down to about 15psi, but don't go any lower. I find that if I take the wheels off the bike and lay them on their side they don't lose very much pressure. I guess I will try adding another scoop of sealant. How hard is it to remove the valve core with pliers? I don't want to damage the valve core, and I don't have a removal tool right now.
Do NOT use pliers to remove the valve core. Pliers have serations on the jaws to enhance grip on round objects etc. These will damage the valve. A small adjustable cresent wrench is the better tool to use. If you don't have one, then either get one, or the correct removal tool, or just pop one section of the bead and add sealant that way.

However, if you are loosing that much pressure over the course of a few hours I would go back and do a complete review of your installation procedures. The wheels I have converted to tubeless have never lost that much air once they were sealed up. I've got two sets of wheels set up tubeless currently and neither looses more than 5 psi over a 3 to 4 day period. I'd go through and carefully check that the tire beads are completely seated. If so then I'd remove the tires and double check rim strip placement, etc. Loosing that much air in that short of a period idicates that some thing isn't right.

Good Dirt
 

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Squash said:
Do NOT use pliers to remove the valve core. Pliers have serations on the jaws to enhance grip on round objects etc. These will damage the valve. A small adjustable cresent wrench is the better tool to use. If you don't have one, then either get one, or the correct removal tool, or just pop one section of the bead and add sealant that way.

However, if you are loosing that much pressure over the course of a few hours I would go back and do a complete review of your installation procedures. The wheels I have converted to tubeless have never lost that much air once they were sealed up. I've got two sets of wheels set up tubeless currently and neither looses more than 5 psi over a 3 to 4 day period. I'd go through and carefully check that the tire beads are completely seated. If so then I'd remove the tires and double check rim strip placement, etc. Loosing that much air in that short of a period idicates that some thing isn't right.

Good Dirt
Dont over-react. Pliers will be fine for a one time use, just be careful, and if it doesnt want to budge, then go buy the proper tool before you destroy the valve.

As stated above, one scoop of sealant is not NEARLY enough for a new tire.

Tires are porous. New tires (unless UST) have lots of microscopic holes that need to be sealed up during that initial set up. I ALWAYS use more than the recommended amount when setting up a new non-UST tire with sealant. Depending on the tire and volume I may add up to 4 scoops of sealant for the initial set up. Then after a couple days, Ill open up that tire and find about a scoops worth of sealant is left over! The tire will absorb alot of that sealant early on. But after that initial set up, the recommended 1.5-2 scoops of sealant is adequate.

If you set up enough tubeless systems, you will soon find out that the first couple of minutes or even days (depending on the tire) are spent simply selaing up the tiny microscopic holes that the tire came with from the factory.

And even still, my 4 month old Fast Trak LK S-WORKS 2Bliss Tire will lose up to 5 PSI every couple days so I have to pump it up before every ride. Its normal

Tubeless isnt fool proof. In fact, it seems to be a magnet for fools who expect magical results with little work/maintinence.
 

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ljsmith said:
Okay, I installed the stans no-tubes on my Easton XC one wheelset. I used Specialized 2-bliss tires. During install it took quite a while to seal the sidewalls of the tires (not the beads, I had no leaks at the beads at all). I finally got it sealed and had no leaks. I only used one scoop of sealant. The tires held air fine for about 3 days, now they are starting to lose pressure. Is this normal? Do I really have to re-seal them this often? How long should I be able to go without adding more sealant or going through the sealing procedure (all the tire shaking).
My buddy is going thru hell right now with the 2Bliss tires. he cannot get them to hold air over night with his Crank Bros Cobalts. He wanted to stay away from sealent but it looks like that's the only option with 2Bliss. I use true UST(no sealant) on my wheels and even though they do lose some air, it only loses about 10 psi every 2 weeks. if i reide consistently i hardly looses any air at all.
 
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