Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
I like turtles
Joined
·
6,374 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have done my fair share of searching and have absorbed much info on converting to tubeless - the amount of info is almost overwhelming! I have the stock Alex DH19 rims and WTB Exiwolfs (wire bead) on my Monocog.

My questions at this point are:

What is the advantage to using Stans 29er kit (~$60) vs. the ghetto method of some combo of gorrila tape/cut tube/rim strip/sealant (~$25)? In my mind, I feel like the kit *should* be engineered to work better. Is it just a glorified ghetto setup? I understand there is a ~$35 savings which I don't really care about if the kit works better.

Has anyone used this specific combo on their bike with success?

I like trying new things and since throwing in the towel and trying disc brakes, I figure what the hell, may as well see what all the tubeless hub-bub is about!

Any comments appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,590 Posts
I've been running ghetto on my monocog (stock DH19 rims) with Rampages for over a year now without problem. Imo, stan's is nice if you are the type that need a turnkey package with instructions. It also seems that the diy sealant doesn't dry out as fast as Stan's. Yes, I think it is a glorified ghetto setup. But, I don't mind mixing the sealant and doing a little engineering.

If I had to do it over, I would loose the ghetto rim strip and run a tape rim strip and glue in a shrader valve stem.

I remember reading that the Exi's sidwalls are on the thinner side for a tubeless setup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,039 Posts
The Exi works fine for tubeless conversion; I've done it before. The sidewalls are no thinner than any similar tire; in fact I think they might even be a bit thicker, which would explain how heavy even the kevlar bead version is and how well they hold up to rock scrapes. What I have found makes the biggest difference for initial conversion is how new the tire is. The sidewalls on well used tires are usually broken down more and can seep a lot of sealant, whereas a relatively new tire might not seep at all.

As for the different conversion styles, the biggest difference is that the split tube method has to be redone from scratch if you change tires (unless you have inhuman abilities to deal with frustration). However, this downside won't affect most people in any significant way because one of the big advantages of tubeless is set and forget. That and when changing tires with a tape method you still have to deal with a sealant mess and get the new tire to seat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,590 Posts
Initially, starting with new tires, I didn't have any issue getting the Rampages to seat with the ghetto strip. But, I added sealant a few months ago and it was a pita to get the tire to seat back up. Definitely needed compressed air. Also, the new Rampages seeped sealant through the sidewalls and still do after a good cleaning, but they hold pressure well.

I guess some folks like the ghetto strip for helping with seating the tire. I can't say I really saw an advantage.
 

·
Life is Go0d!
Joined
·
891 Posts
Measure the inside of your rim... compare that to available sizes of bontrager rim strips. Find a close match, buy the strips and 2 to0bless valve stems, sealant, and voila! To0bless done right without hassle. The key is figuring out whether the wheel bed is symetrical, or asymetrical. It matters when choosing the right rim strip. Any Trek dealer can hook you up.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top