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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to convert a Scott Reflex 20 to a SS, I got the 9spd chainrings (32). Should I get a SS sprocket? Would the 9spd work? Should I just go to a shop and get a generic steel ring? Like $40+ for a ring that says surly seems kind of dumb to me. And I'm not a weight weiner either - if it matters.

I would think a generic steel ring would work fine. Whatcha think?

Heres what I'm looking at:
Wheels Manu. SS kit (comes with 16t)
KMC SS chain
DMR sts tensioner

Might order a few different cogs they are only $4 on Jenson, so I can experiment with ratios. I think 32t sprocket would work good.
Cheers mates.
 

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SS conversion

I would definitely get a chainring without ramps and pins like the ones that come on 3x9 or 2x9 because there is no real way that the chain will come off of the chainring other than a bad crash or something catastrophic. If you are using a rear wheel with a 9spd free hub I wouldn't use the $4 cogs. They are great for finding the gearing you like but they will eventually dig into the freehub body and possibly keep you from putting a cassette on it. Endless bikes Co. makes a sweet cog with a wide base. Surly and Niner also make nice cogs. You will save yourself alot of headaches using SS specific stuff on your conversion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just to mention this is a wheelset that came stock on the bike I have another hardtail multi gear I use thats been upgraded. So this is mainly parts that have been laying around. What conversion kits would you recommend? This is going on a 9spd hub. I think I'm going to go with the Wheels Manu, and use that 16t cog for a while than make the jump to a higher quality cog the surly looks good at $20. Once I figure out the ratio I want to ride.
 

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I wouldn't worry about a ss chainring right now. If you have a good chain line and good tension, you're not going to lose the chain up front. The DMR STS is an excellent tensioner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What conversion kit have you all used? What do you think of the Gussetbikes kit from beyond bikes?
 

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wallyman
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The Surly Chain rings are worth the money. They are hard to wear out and the teeth are longer so the chain stays in place better. The single speed rear cogs have a wider base and grab the freehub much better than a take off cog from a cassette. The Surly SS cogs are very stong and show very little wear.
 

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kes12 said:
I would definitely get a chainring without ramps and pins like the ones that come on 3x9 or 2x9 because there is no real way that the chain will come off of the chainring other than a bad crash or something catastrophic. If you are using a rear wheel with a 9spd free hub I wouldn't use the $4 cogs. They are great for finding the gearing you like but they will eventually dig into the freehub body and possibly keep you from putting a cassette on it. Endless bikes Co. makes a sweet cog with a wide base. Surly and Niner also make nice cogs. You will save yourself alot of headaches using SS specific stuff on your conversion.
please clarify more. The $4 cogs will only dig in if you have an aluminum freehub. There is no problem using them on steel freehubs, which the Reflex 20 likely has.
 

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Retro Grouch
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bad mechanic said:
I wouldn't worry about a ss chainring right now. If you have a good chain line and good tension, you're not going to lose the chain up front. The DMR STS is an excellent tensioner.
And BTW, as with most tensioners it's not compatible with 1/8" chains.
 

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wallyman said:
The Surly Chain rings are worth the money. They are hard to wear out and the teeth are longer so the chain stays in place better. The single speed rear cogs have a wider base and grab the freehub much better than a take off cog from a cassette. The Surly SS cogs are very stong and show very little wear.
i dissagree, the Surly SS chain ring is too soft of a grade of stainless. I've bent the hell out of them on many occasions, and tacoed one climbing a steep hill. I've never had so many issues with dropping chains/bent teeth as i have with the Surly. I reccomend an E-thirteen or Salsa non-ramped chain ring. Here's the one i have, and it's been great for a few years now. http://www.e13components.com/product_guiderings.html
 

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boomn said:
please clarify more. The $4 cogs will only dig in if you have an aluminum freehub. There is no problem using them on steel freehubs, which the Reflex 20 likely has.
agreed, and my cheap cogs dig in less on my aluminum dt swiss hubs than the few loose cogs on my 9 speed sram 990 cassette.
But, ideally, it's best to use the wider ones.
 

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ISuckAtRiding said:
agreed, and my cheap cogs dig in less on my aluminum dt swiss hubs than the few loose cogs on my 9 speed sram 990 cassette.
But, ideally, it's best to use the wider ones.
If there is no difference on a steel freehub then what makes the wider ones more ideal?

My answer to my own question is that it would only matter if the wider, more expensive ones also have better teeth, are more round, or something else. Sorry, just picking fights now. I think I need more coffee
 

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I NEVER had any problem about using cassette rear cog (cheap one @ 2-3$) They usuallly last arround 1000km max.

They don't dig in steel freehub, but they diged into a friend titanium chrisking and will most likely dig into an aluminium freehub.

Even with a tensionner I had problem with the chain falling of the front chainring. (Chain drop unless I put a great tension on the chain (even with a good chainline). This was with a shimano chainring.
 

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boomn said:
If there is no difference on a steel freehub then what makes the wider ones more ideal?

My answer to my own question is that it would only matter if the wider, more expensive ones also have better teeth, are more round, or something else. Sorry, just picking fights now. I think I need more coffee
the cheap ones are stamped, not machined, and are made of cheaper material, most likely. However, i've been using the same crappy ones since like 2005 with no issues, and i actually paid $9 for a pack of 6 different sizes.
They'll work fine for most applications, they're just not the best out there, obviously. Kinda like a Moots would be ideal, but my piece-o-crap bianchi puss more than suits it's purpose.:D
 

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ISuckAtRiding said:
the cheap ones are stamped, not machined, and are made of cheaper material, most likely. However, i've been using the same crappy ones since like 2005 with no issues, and i actually paid $9 for a pack of 6 different sizes.
They'll work fine for most applications, they're just not the best out there, obviously. Kinda like a Moots would be ideal, but my piece-o-crap bianchi puss more than suits it's purpose.:D
Ahh, the "Moots defense". That is a tough one to counter
 

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ISuckAtRiding said:
Haha, well, i'd still never buy one. I ride my SS because i'm cheap. Moots defeats the purpose, IMO.
But everyone needs something to dream for. Someday I would like to own a Surly cog, that is my dream
 

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bad mechanic said:
I wouldn't worry about a ss chainring right now. If you have a good chain line and good tension, you're not going to lose the chain up front. The DMR STS is an excellent tensioner.
hmm i never tried DMR's STS. is the roller really hard plastic?
 

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nuck_chorris said:
hmm i never tried DMR's STS. is the roller really hard plastic?
I used to have a different brand's version of the same thing. They are indeed hard plastic, same thing as the rollers used on front chainguides for AM/DH
 

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while we're on the topic of tensioners, i really liked the Surly one that i had on my first 2 SS's. It made tire changes easy, didnt change your geometry when you change your ratio, and there was no chance of the wheel moving forward and dropping the chain or causing brake rubbage. I kinda wish i hadnt switched to horizontal dropouts lol
 
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