Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
We have two

We have two single speed road bikes and one geared bike. The son that rides the geared bike is always having trouble with something out of adjustment, The single speed bikes just keep on working.

Fixed geared bikes are great for fun and fitness, but I don't like them for traffic or hilly areas.

We just single speeded two old road bikes because it was a practical and easy thing to do.
 

·
34N 118W
Joined
·
2,246 Posts
flip flop ya don't stop

Trail Punk said:
Anyone got ideas for a SS roady, with maybe a rear disc brake (Avid cable)?
I decided on a flip flop rear hub. Freewheel for the big hills, fixie for the flats. Or run fixie up the hills, stop at the top, flip the wheel and bomb down. I'm sure it'll end up on the fixed side most of the time, but now I won't pass up rides due to big hills.

I agree that a SS freewheel-only roadie could get old.

but then I agree that pink bikes are pretty.

HW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
681 Posts
I have a flip-flop hub on my roadie but I"m too lazy so it just stays fixed. In fact the other day I took off the rear brake and scavenged the free wheel for my ss mtb. I've been riding the fixed all the time though. In fact, when I"m on my beater bike which freewheels I feel kind of out of control in traffic. On my fixie I can do a nice trackstand at the lights and have even gotten to the point where I can back up about 3 feet. In fact, last time I was on my beater I had a hard time coasting. Every time I tried to cast my brain would scream "noooooo!". Its odd how quickly what's "normal" can change. Wow major segway, anyway I think its a good call with the flip-flop hub. That way you're covered either way...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
I like SS on the road

supercorsa said:
agree w/ everybody here, SS on the road is retarded. fixed is the only way to go.
Let's choose better words...no reason to use "retarded".

As for SS on the road. I like it. I have a fixed and ride it all the time but sometimes I just like the SS on the road. Sometimes when I go on rides I just like to "zone out" and have come close to hitting the pavement a few times when the fixie "reminds me" to keep pedaling. Freewheeling is much better for spacing out on a ride.

Ultimately, if you are constantly pedaling on a long ride the difference between fixed and SS on the road is minimal. On a downhill fixie riders always complain they wish they could just coast...hmmmmmmm, souns like SS on the road is not that bad afterall!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
My experience ...

has been that I prefer the freewhell for weaving in and out of traffic - i like being able to stand tall and coast up to intersections. Once the new Kona Sutra comes out, I;ll be very happy (Road bike with sliding rear dropouts, disc specific). My hub is flip flop, and I rode fixed exclusively for several months, and enjoyed it greatly, but found the freewheel more natural in traffic.

Maybe I'm just not hardcore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
371 Posts
I like SS on the road...

OK, here's mine as a before and after.

Before:
Bought on mtbreview.com classifieds as a 36:18.

After:
New Titec Seat (bought from friend)
Red Vredestein road tires
Speedplay X3 pedals from Performance
Race Face 44T from ebay
SRAM chain from LBS
Cinelli Groove stem from ebay (curved stem works well w/ the frame)
Wireless Supergo computer
Dia Compe 287V (easiest/cheapest way to keep the vbrakes)

Love the ride, it's my commuter and weekend road trainer. Not the fastest but definitely a conversation piece. A nice break from my IF Planet X. Next step would probably be w/ a flip flop. However, since this bike is sometimes used to pull a Burley trailer, fixed is not really a "safe" option.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Specialized Langster

I just replied to someone else's thread about this bike. But here goes again for your viewing pleasure.

Here is a Specialized Langster with FreeWheel/Fixed Flip Flop hub option (standard!) and brakes.

Its all you need, flip/flop to try both versions of the hub out to see if you like either/or and suit yourself. I test rode this last night in fact and really did enjoy the quickness, agility, and speeeeeeed that it had.

Oh and the 54cc frame all built out was really really light. Its a looker and easy on the wallet ($440.00 MSRP).

[/IMG]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Oh and fixed vs. free.

There is no such thing as retarded in using a SS road bike in the city. It gives you a lot more handling ability when you need it (quick sprints and holding steady, or weaving in and out of the cabbie melee).

I'm sure over 90% of the bike messengers I see here in Chicago are on free-wheel hubs and not fixed. I'm actually getting my bike based on reviews and suggestions from those same bike messengers.

But if you're out in the sticks or wherever you can mindlessly pedal til your hearts content, then good on ya and I can see the benefit of fixed over free in that environment. But if you have to stop and go constantly and play dodge car its not so great.

Regards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
fixed/free

I agree that freewheels aren't retarded, but also think a freewheel SS would be boring on medium/long road rides. Get a flip-flop hub and you'll be able to decide for yourself.

As for what folks said about city riding, I don't think a freewheeel gives you any more ability to "stand tall," nor is it really a factor in "handling ability." In many ways, a fixee handles better than a freewheeled bike -- especially at slow speeds often necessary in the city. Yeah, you can't zone out as much, but if you're riding in the city (streets/sidewalks/both), you shouldn't be zoning out anyway. I think fixee bike handling is a cool new set of skills to learn and makes me a stronger rider. IMO, you should run a good front brake for emergency stopping when fixing and botrh brakes if using freewheel.

1GB
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
Depends on where you live and what sort of riding you are doing.

I ride fixed and freewheel on the road as of late, and with the amount of cobbles, potholes, tram lines, insane drivers, and rabid dogs on the road I like to have the peace of mind I can stop pedalling when I need to. Out for a noodle in the country on tarmac or dirt - fixed it is.

Sam

Edit: Oh yeah, as for what bike to build up, the criteria are basically the same as for a fixie. Mid 80's Japanese made steel bikes with horizontal or semi-horizontal drops are your best bet.
 

·
highly visible
Joined
·
3,284 Posts
Shiftless on the road is fun

Personally - and please, this is just my opinion - I don't have much interest in fixed riding. I have to work hard enough on the climbs that I wouldn't want to "waste" that hard-earned elevation on the downhills by not coasting. No flames please - I have the utmost repsect for fixie riders and I fully support their choice, but I am not interested in joining their ranks.

Anyway, my roadie/'crosser has 2 chainrings and a couple of cogs so I can have 2-3 gear combinations to choose from. I have to get off the bike to change gears, so I don't change gears much, but it's nice to have the option. Maybe not truly SS, but then by that reasoning neither is running a flip-flop hub.

Last year I posted a writeup on the old SS board of a 68 mile road ride I did on my derailleur-less bike. This ride featured 5000 feet of climbing thorugh spectacular high desert terrain. I changed gears a total of 5 times, basically timing my rest breaks to coincide with those occasions. The previous fall I posted another travelogue of a 90 mile mixed road/dirt/scrambling-with-the-bike-over-my-shoulder epic centered around the Deschutes canyon, using essentially the same drivetrain with gear changes occurring only on the handful of occasions where the terrain changed dramatically.

I highly recommend going shiftless, especially for these long solo rides where you're out exploring for the pleasure of it and don't have to keep up with your buddies or post the shortest possible elapsed time. For me, these rides are all about the freedom of the open road. It seems paradoxical to non-SSers, but much as with SS mountain biking, not having a shifter at my fingertips, just pedaling faster and slower with the terrain, only enhances the sense of freedom I most enjoy on rides like this. Sure, on the road you're almost always faster with gears, no question about it. But speed isn't always the point, is it?

- Dan

(By the way, my 'crosser is a Bianchi Volpe, a bike I highly recommend. It's inexpensive, it's a pound lighter than a Cross-Check, it has horizontal dropouts so you can ditch the derailer ... and it's a Bianchi.)
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top