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I like platform pedals myself because im a everyday type person and I like using my feet when I crash. Im not knocking clipless pedals I have never used them. But what do other riders use? Tell me why you use a certain type.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks

I say some stupid things sometimes.Usually I say or type it before I know it. Gets me in trouble with the ladies but o'well. THANKS ... What do you ride and why
 

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Clipless. Upstroke is crucial when you can't downshift. The idea that clipless pedals are dangerous is 95% garbage. Your feet just sort of pop out of them when they need to. I'll take the tiny bit of increased danger associated with being clipped in over the danger of my foot coming off the pedal on accident. Survive the first week with them and your on easy street. Different strokes for different folks I suppose.

And yeah, this thread is super redundant and I probably shouldn't have contributed to it.
 

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wes m. said:
The idea that clipless pedals are dangerous is 95% garbage.
its 100% garbage. i have been riding clipless for 5 years now. i put more thought into clipping in that i do when i need to get out. i could not imagin riding any mountain bike with platforms, let along a single speed. your upstroke is equally as improtnant as your down stroke.
 

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So let me get this straight: I buy clipless than a special pair of magic shoes to ride. Ok and hows this suppose to help me? I've never had problems with slipage. So now how will these improve my riding? I dont want to but something because everyone else has them, they look cool, or there they in thing. Performance is key: so does this give me more on my stroke? HOW? I know im Fred Flintstone when it comes to technology or change? I go with what I know.
 

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Captain_America1976 said:
its 100% garbage. i have been riding clipless for 5 years now. i put more thought into clipping in that i do when i need to get out. i could not imagin riding any mountain bike with platforms, let along a single speed. your upstroke is equally as improtnant as your down stroke.
I reckon it's all bollocks unless you're racing when that tiny percent of extra thrust from the upstroke may make that few seconds difference.

If you have trouble with your feet coming off a good quality set of platforms you probably have too much weight on your arse instead of taking it on your feet.
 

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I don't ride plats 'cause I think they're 'dangerous'. Contraire, I've ridden thousands of miles in clipless pedals on my roadie. Unclipping without having to think about it is 2nd nature, but I confess I haven't done it offroad. I ditched 'em because I got iliotibial band syndrome one spring when I added too many miles too fast (basically a century 1st good warm day we had, really dumb), and I was never able to get rid of it UNTIL I ditched the clipless pedals. Being able to shift my foot around on the pedal goes miles (heh...) towards relieving any tightness I start feeling at the outside of my knee. It just feels better, so that's why I rides plats.
I'm hearing what everyone says about how crucial the upstroke is to SS'ing. I've got a pair of Eggbeaters I'll throw on my new SS 29'er (when I get it) and give 'em a try again.
But I like the feeling of being on plats, so if it's not night and day, I'll probably go back to 'em. Besides, it makes a statement when I'm pedaling in my Converse hightops. Entry level, inexpensive? I had Shimano PD540's, and no complaints. I'll let you know how I like the entry level stainless Eggbeaters soon as I try 'em. A really good shoe to go with those PD 540's I found to be the Specialized Body Geometry Mountain Sport shoes. No hotspots, don't look dorky, give your feet good support. It's just trail riding...you don't have to spend a freakin' fortune, like the roadies do.
 

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V-Shaped Rut
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The earth is 6000 years old, forget that carbon dating stuff and trust that old book. Its also flat and supported by elephants who are standing on a turtle.

And platforms are just as efficient as clipless. Carry on, no need to change what you're doing at this point. :thumbsup:

big ro said:
I know im Fred Flintstone when it comes to technology or change? I go with what I know.
 

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big ro said:
So let me get this straight: I buy clipless than a special pair of magic shoes to ride. Ok and hows this suppose to help me? I've never had problems with slipage. So now how will these improve my riding? I dont want to but something because everyone else has them, they look cool, or there they in thing. Performance is key: so does this give me more on my stroke? HOW? I know im Fred Flintstone when it comes to technology or change? I go with what I know.
Its hard to distinguish some ones tone over the internet but this seems to be a dickish response considering that you asked people to tell you why they like clipless.

Clipless can improve your riding in the following ways compared to platforms:

Having upstroke, in fact add improved forward and backward stroke to that. This helps a lot in climbing because it adds to your total power and allows you to use more of your leg which reduces fatigue in the muscle that push the pedal down.

Power transfer, stiffer shoes = better power transfer

Maneuverability, being clipped allows you more ability to manipulate the bike, especially the rear end

Bike specific shoes, clipless shoes are designed for riding, lots of vents and other stuff to keep your feet comfy.

These are benefits that I have personal experience with. I have ridden both types or pedals and oldschool toe clip pedals too. My ability to climb with clipless pedals is seriously double what it was on platforms. You dont even need to choose between the two, just buy crank bros mallet c. I love them and they cost less than high end platforms. I got a pair of mallet c pedals and the low end of the racing level shimano shoes from 07 for $120 out the door.

This analogy is a exaggerated but it should give you an idea of how I feel. Riding with platform pedals is like not wrapping your fingers around the handlebars. Being attached means being in control.

I find the idea of people riding clipless because its fashionable to be sort of misguided. The shoes look f'ing ridiculous if you ask me.

Thats my 2 cents.
 

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For me it's not the upstroke when climbing that matters most, it's the ability to stay connected to the bike when bouncing around in rocky terrain. With platform pedals you have to maintain downward pressure on the pedals or you lose contact. With clipless pedals you don't have to worry about coming off the pedals. As far as crashing goes, the only time I have ever had an issue with getting unclipped is during super low speed tip overs. I'd much prefer platforms for slow technical climbs, but that's the only time they work better. For all other conditions, a clipless pedal is superior. And don't forget, if you do pop off of your platform pedal, you are quite likely to get a serious case of "shin burger" when that sucker rakes across your leg.

And yes, this has been covered ad nauseum in other posts. But I just felt like spewing my worthless 2 cents anyway. Thanks for listening.
 

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I suppose it all comes down to what you use your mountain bike for. For playing roundy round stuff like racing on a circuit or play park, then clipless would be ok because basically you're just using your bike as a toy, and help is at hand.

If you use your mountain bike for getting yourself deep into the mountains, then the first consideration is to have footwear you can walk out on (try walking more than a few miles on rough terrain with cleated shoes). I always reckon the first consideration is to dress for the mountain, not the bike.

I really don't get this stuff about feet coming off platform pedals - just like SPDs they need technique. If your feet are slipping off on platforms, your technique is wrong. Same principle as a motocross bike doing 90mph, get your weight on your feet, not on the saddle.

BTW you can get significant upthrust with platforms by using an old pedalling style called ankling.
 

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rigid bruce
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Ride each way for a year or so and then decide. It's as easy as that. There is no shortcut to finding out for yourself.
I ride with platforms. I don't find clipless to be more efficient or increase power but you might. For me clipless pedals would feel as out of place on a singlespeed as gears or a suspension fork.
bruce b.
 

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Velobike said:
I suppose it all comes down to what you use your mountain bike for. For playing roundy round stuff like racing on a circuit or play park, then clipless would be ok because basically you're just using your bike as a toy, and help is at hand.

If you use your mountain bike for getting yourself deep into the mountains, then the first consideration is to have footwear you can walk out on (try walking more than a few miles on rough terrain with cleated shoes). I always reckon the first consideration is to dress for the mountain, not the bike.

I really don't get this stuff about feet coming off platform pedals - just like SPDs they need technique. If your feet are slipping off on platforms, your technique is wrong. Same principle as a motocross bike doing 90mph, get your weight on your feet, not on the saddle.

BTW you can get significant upthrust with platforms by using an old pedalling style called ankling.
Great post!:thumbsup: You're right....thanks for reminding me for the other major reason I like plats. You can actually walk around like an ordinary person, when you get to the beautiful place you're going to...DOH! Try that with your dork shoes. I used to hate that, with my roadie. I'd get to this beautiful place, have to walk like a penguin. Even SPD, the cleats aren't going to let you hike any trails. It's called 'real world' riding. You rule, Velobike.:D
 

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Not trying to start anything here, but what does deep into the mountains mean, and not using the bike as a toy? Bikes are toys. 20 miles in? 40? A multi day trek? If so, you're smart to pack a kit including extra shoes and a GPS beacon. Its no reason to go for that long with less efficient pedaling. Here is a pic at the finish line of the GDR after 22 days of riding from canada to mexico. Check out the clown shoes and those crazy pedals!

Edit, linky don't work, clicky instead:

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/_ttmJ_nLqvnA/SHmg_DhElTI/AAAAAAAACSM/_vSAjggRS8w/s1600-h/GDR_024.JPG

Velobike said:
I suppose it all comes down to what you use your mountain bike for. For playing roundy round stuff like racing on a circuit or play park, then clipless would be ok because basically you're just using your bike as a toy, and help is at hand.

If you use your mountain bike for getting yourself deep into the mountains, then the first consideration is to have footwear you can walk out on (try walking more than a few miles on rough terrain with cleated shoes). I always reckon the first consideration is to dress for the mountain, not the bike.

I really don't get this stuff about feet coming off platform pedals - just like SPDs they need technique. If your feet are slipping off on platforms, your technique is wrong. Same principle as a motocross bike doing 90mph, get your weight on your feet, not on the saddle.

BTW you can get significant upthrust with platforms by using an old pedalling style called ankling.
 

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Velobike said:
I suppose it all comes down to what you use your mountain bike for. For playing roundy round stuff like racing on a circuit or play park, then clipless would be ok because basically you're just using your bike as a toy, and help is at hand.

If you use your mountain bike for getting yourself deep into the mountains, then the first consideration is to have footwear you can walk out on (try walking more than a few miles on rough terrain with cleated shoes). I always reckon the first consideration is to dress for the mountain, not the bike.

I really don't get this stuff about feet coming off platform pedals - just like SPDs they need technique. If your feet are slipping off on platforms, your technique is wrong. Same principle as a motocross bike doing 90mph, get your weight on your feet, not on the saddle.

BTW you can get significant upthrust with platforms by using an old pedalling style called ankling.
I'm gonna go out on a limb and say most mountain bikers don't walk for miles in their clipless shoes, they ride in them. Who knows really, I might be totally off.
 

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big_slacker said:
... what does deep into the mountains mean...
...Bikes are toys. 20 miles in? 40? A multi day trek?
...If so, you're smart to pack a kit including extra shoes and a GPS beacon. Its no reason to go for that long with less efficient pedaling....
Deep is relative. Think broken bike, or broken self, and it all becomes very different. Expect it to happen to you one day and be prepared for self rescue.

In Australia people have died when they had to walk just 10 miles to get help - simply because they did not have suitable cover or sufficient water - they relied on the reliability of their transport, but it broke.

About a year ago, here in the Highlands of Scotland, we had an experienced fit young man who had raced in 24 hour winter races, die of exposure in a blizzard within half a mile of his car. From what I read, the weather conditions went bad and he didn't have suitable gear on.

So deep depends on you. How far can you go self supported when things go really really bad? Say broken bike, severely adverse weather, some injury - pick how lucky you think you are going to be.

My day ride kit means I can self support at least 24 hrs without shelter. No way am I going to add the weight of an extra pair of shoes to that. If I add extra weight it would be clothing or food.

As for the bike being a toy, that comes back to my original statement. Some people use a bike as transport, but if you are using your bike as a toy, then you are usually well within the reach of help, so what you put on your feet is irrelevant.

As far as the extra efficiency of pulling up, has there been any real world tests on this on a mountainbike for several hours? (I don't doubt its usefulness on a road bike where you are seated most of the time)
 

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The shoe makers realize the need for walkable bike shoes - check out the choices from Sidi, Shimano and Lake as well as some new entries from Bontrager including the cheap(er) Race which I use in Pisgah for the many hike-a-bikes and rocky stream crossings. No need for extra shoes.... although the Race is a bit heavy it makes a great training shoe.
 
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