Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Getting too old for this...
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, after 5 years, I decided to replace the foam wipers and dust seals on my 2016 SID XX fork. 32mm.

I ordered the kit from amazon, and after some prying, got the old seals to pop out and shoot across the garage.

But, I could NOT get the new ones inserted. No way, no how. I tried everything, and actually ruined one seal, it's not round anymore, so I tossed it.

I had bought what I believed was the correct seal install tool years ago, see attached photo. The off-white cylinder. With zero instructions included, I just assumed the male protrusion was the side down into the fork, as it's the same diameter as the stanchions it seems. But no matter how hard I hit it, I couldn't get even one side to start, let alone the whole seal evenly. I confirmed twice the new seals are correct. They look identical to the originals. But, the old ones had much less ridges around the sides, not sure if these were rubbed off from installation, or just an old design?

I even had a set of grey seals that came with a smaller service kit, tried those too, same thing.

So I look around, google it all, and see a 2nd tool that no one seems to sell, see attached, the black piece. But again, no idea if that's the whole tool, or if you are supposed to use both the white piece with the black "handle" piece?

The sram webpage, here: Dust Seal Installation Tool - 32mm - TL-FST-S32-A1 - RockShox
shows both pieces! But amazon and other places seem to sell just the tan cylinder.

So anyone know definitive answers, or know of a pdf explaining this:

1. Do you in fact use both together? Black on top of the tan?
2. Which way does the tan piece go? The male part sticking down into the seal, or the other side, that would only seem to touch the outer edge of the seal?
3. Are they sold separately, or do both come in the kit?
4. Anyone actually USE these? Is there some 3rd party solution that's almost guaranteed to get those seals in evenly the first time without pounding with a hammer?

Thank you in advance!

1943166
1943165
 

Attachments

·
Disgruntled Peccary
Joined
·
6,502 Posts
I have one of those, I've never used it. So I can't answer questions 1-3. For number 4, the abbey tool is great in that you can swap heads for seal sizes, and is ridiculously easy to use.

here's the difference between them.
1943167
 

·
Registered
Getting too old for this...
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That abbey makes sense, it goes down in the fork lower leg an inch or more, so I could guess it would keep the seal straight. I guess I'll grab one of those. I'm sure it's not cheap though. If Sram simply had a pdf or something showing how to use their tool, that would be nice. I looked on youtube for "replace rock shox seals" and the like, and usually they have no problem just pushing new ones in most of the way. Not me though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,326 Posts
I've used just that tan piece and you use the male end to drive the seal. It works ok but as mentioned the abbey tool is plainly superior.

No way would I buy the abbey unless I were doing a lot of fork rebuilds though, the plastic one is fine for occasional use ime.
 

·
Registered
Getting too old for this...
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I did find the black plastic rock shox on amazon, using different search terms, it's almost $40! But the Abbey is almost $100. And there are Unior and generics for $20 that seem to be similar. The key it seems is the piece that goes down into the bushings to keep everything centered. The rock shox amazon page does not show or mention the tan part at all. So why show it together on their main website? Very confusing to me.

The Fox gets great reviews, claiming you can't overshoot it and drive the seals too deep, which I did actually. I had to use a wrench and pry them up 1/16" or more to keep them from squishing the foam wipers below. It was a mess last night, let me tell you.

So I guess I need to read some more reviews. One thing's for sure, the tan piece is useless for me. Didn't help at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
397 Posts
I did find the black plastic rock shox on amazon, using different search terms, it's almost $40! But the Abbey is almost $100. And there are Unior and generics for $20 that seem to be similar. The key it seems is the piece that goes down into the bushings to keep everything centered. The rock shox amazon page does not show or mention the tan part at all. So why show it together on their main website? Very confusing to me.

The Fox gets great reviews, claiming you can't overshoot it and drive the seals too deep, which I did actually. I had to use a wrench and pry them up 1/16" or more to keep them from squishing the foam wipers below. It was a mess last night, let me tell you.

So I guess I need to read some more reviews. One thing's for sure, the tan piece is useless for me. Didn't help at all.
Dude, dont buy the Unior ones, they are total shite, each size is approx 2mm smaller in diameter than they should be and as they are for flanged wipers only due to a smaller diameter mating part to the top of the wiper they will drive said wiper approx 1.5mm too deep into the fork if used with flangless wipers, and then its difficult to get the foams in or they will be squashed and then get hung up when i stalling the stantchons, and they will be cock-eyed. I made this very mistake until I bought a set of the FOX, no regrets.
 

·
Registered
Getting too old for this...
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I read that review, and passed. I did order some other brand, $15, all positive, and no mention of undersized mating part. Will have it saturday, if that blows, I'll splurge on the Fox one and be done. Man mountain bikes sure have gotten complicated since I started in 1991. I remember tearing a Manitou fork apart down to the bear bones with nothing but a crescent wrench and allen keys. Heck, the whole bike was torn down that way. Granted, the fork didn't work all that well, but still. Inner tubes, no rear suspension, threaded BB, all that stuff. Was so easy to work on a bike in the old days. Now, my tool bench has so many specialty tools it's insane. Every component seems to need at least one or more special tools and pieces.
 

·
Disgruntled Peccary
Joined
·
6,502 Posts
The abbey is like $25 for the seal head and $25 for the drivers. So basically the seal head costs what that rockshox turned delron piece does.. You don't need to buy the full set. It IS kind of splurgy, but in the realm of their tools.. it's pretty cheap.

(oh, and when you own one.. you end up doing a lot of fork rebuilds, it's like owning a pickup when people move)
 

·
otb club member
Joined
·
3,052 Posts
Ours was the first piloted press tool. They are not the cheapest because they are designed and made USA from start to finish. The dual wiper seal kits are an especially good value because they cover two sizes for the same price. These can be used where no separate oil seal is used. For example, the 35mm and 36mm tool:
 

·
Registered
Getting too old for this...
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I couldn't find just the seal handle at all for Abbey. I even emailed them. They seem to sell at minimum a 2 head and handle kit for $100, or just the 32mm head for $30, no handle on it's own. At least that's what I found.

I don't mind spending dough on tools, that's for sure. I have a zillion tools, all the fluids for everything, between my hydro lockouts, shimano brakes, forks, I have about 10 bottles of oils sitting here, and every tool that goes with them. I just had never touched seals before. Had no idea how tricky they might be. I thought they just smush in the fork with my palm or something.
 

·
Registered
Getting too old for this...
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
it's in the fork seal press drivers page, in the drop down :)
DOH! I did not notice that! Oh man, I feel like a dope.

I like that RWC, and would love to support a US maker to boot. But I need this thing for saturday if possible, and I'm sure shipping that quick won't work. But I'm going to grab either a RWC or Abbey set anyway as I love nice tools. Both are about the same price.

Thanks to you guys for getting me informed on all this. I thought I knew my way around bike tools...nope. Always something new to figure out.
 

·
BOOM goes the dynamite!
Joined
·
6,804 Posts
DIY version: grab one of your seals and take it with you to the hardware store. Get some PVC pipe with an inner diameter that'll just barely fit over the spring bit and sits flat on the lip of the seal. 1 1/2" worked perfect for my 32mm SKF seals with maybe 1mm or less clearance inside the pipe. While not as fancy or stable as the expensive ones it's worked just fine for me. It even came in a pre-cut ~18" length so I didn't have to buy a huge piece and cut it down. I think it was like ~$3 at the time.

Bonus: it works for fork crown races pretty well, too! Just don't use the same end for both.
 

·
Advanced Slacker
Joined
·
15,778 Posts
Ours was the first piloted press tool. They are not the cheapest because they are designed and made USA from start to finish. The dual wiper seal kits are an especially good value because they cover two sizes for the same price. These can be used where no separate oil seal is used. For example, the 35mm and 36mm tool:
I bought the RWC 35mm Fork Seal Press Tool (for separate seal and dust wiper) and it is awesome. It made flangeless wipers a breeze.
 

·
Registered
Getting too old for this...
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I thought about that. But forgot to try it. I have a new set of seals that just showed up and a proper tool. What is the purpose of the old tan Sram thing? That seems useless for the job it’s meant to do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,544 Posts
I thought about that. But forgot to try it. I have a new set of seals that just showed up and a proper tool. What is the purpose of the old tan Sram thing? That seems useless for the job it's meant to do.
Works fine, but requires a deal of care to insert the seals square/flush with the surface of the fork. The piloted/depth-stopped tools are superior in every way.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top