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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

Received a new frame and didn't know it had a 130mm rear dropout spacing until I tried mounting the rear wheel on, which has a 135mm hub.

It took only very little effort to fit the wheel, I was basically able to "force" the stays opened using 2 fingers, by fitting 1 side in, then pusing on the cassette with my thumb and pulling on the chainstay with my index...

You guys think this will stress the frame at all or could become an issue long term?

I have to overhaul this hub soon and think it has a couple 2.5mm spacers anyways, I'll probably remove a spacer and fix dish, that should make it an almost perfect fit....

Thoughts?
 

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don't do it. titanium OK it flexes

steel OK it flexes

aluminum big nope. expect it to crack
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wow really? for as small as 2-3 mm spread?

Just to be clear, not looking to permanently "cold" setting the frame here, just forcing the wheel in, which requires to spread the rear dropouts by 3-4mm...

Anyways, I've unmounted the wheel until I respace the hub... this got me scared...

Thanks
 

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yes. the aluminum frame has a hard enough job to do without added stresses. they crack here and there anyway...lots and lots of aluminum crack stories [and this is with everything within design specification]

lots of steel and titanium crack stories too...but aluminum wins the failure rate hands down....

widening a stay increases risk by an order of magnitude when talking about aluminum. it's magical and lightweight but very brittle and non-compliant
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yes. the aluminum frame has a hard enough job to do without added stresses. they crack here and there anyway...lots and lots of aluminum crack stories [and this is with everything within design specification]

widening a stay increases risk by an order of magnitude when talking about aluminum. it's magical and lightweight but very brittle and non-compliant
Thanks, I'll respace the hub and be done with it!!

Cheers!
 

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Lots of aluminum crack stories about, yes.

At the same time there are tons of cracked steel frames and nobody bats an eyelid.

And in fatigue tests aluminum frames surpass steel ones by a large margin.

Now, I would not recommend using a 135 mm hub in a 130 mm frame made of any material, but AL isn't the "magical and very brittle" material it's made out to be. It is less "springy and compliant" than stainless steel, but weakening aluminum by bending it requires significant bending and a lot of stress cycles.

Reduce the OLD of the hub as soon as possible, but don't believe the AL-horror-hype.
 

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Repeated spreading of the rear triangle to fit the 135 spaced wheel will work harden the aluminum and will likely result in cracking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Problem solved!

I removed 2x 2mm washers, one on each side, and the wheel slides right in the dropouts without any effort.
Had to cut approx 3mm of the axle too.

Dish is still perfect and chain line doesn't appear to have been affected since I removed the same thickness on each side of the wheel.

Thanks all for the feedback!!
 
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