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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've have a Fisher Tassahara HT for about 5 years and ride in hard packed, rocky Arizona, and am past due on an upgrade, or maybe I'm just bored and would rather spend my money than my wife spend my money. I'm more of a weekend rider a bit better than a beginner, and if it matters, I'm 5'11" and a buck seventy and am a BARGAIN HUNTER. I drive 10 miles to save 2 bucks, so value is very important to my psyche. I like fast fun trails w/o a lot of death defying stunts, but would like a durable bike (value).
From my reseach, I think I'm looking at an Ibex Asta Pro or a Jamis Parker II, for a price point about $1700,
I'm not good enough yet to find the nuances between the two, or perhaps even to appreciate the ride differences, but can certainly see the advantage to being able to testride the Jamis. Still, I've never done the FS, so I don't realy know what to FEEL for.
Any other bike suggestions, or am I on a good path?

agomez
 

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Bad combination: Cheap and bad at math....

agomez said:
I've have a Fisher Tassahara HT for about 5 years and ride in hard packed, rocky Arizona, and am past due on an upgrade, or maybe I'm just bored and would rather spend my money than my wife spend my money. I'm more of a weekend rider a bit better than a beginner, and if it matters, I'm 5'11" and a buck seventy and am a BARGAIN HUNTER. I drive 10 miles to save 2 bucks, so value is very important to my psyche. I like fast fun trails w/o a lot of death defying stunts, but would like a durable bike (value).
From my reseach, I think I'm looking at an Ibex Asta Pro or a Jamis Parker II, for a price point about $1700,
I'm not good enough yet to find the nuances between the two, or perhaps even to appreciate the ride differences, but can certainly see the advantage to being able to testride the Jamis. Still, I've never done the FS, so I don't realy know what to FEEL for.
Any other bike suggestions, or am I on a good path?

agomez
Assuming your car averages 20 mpg, driving 10 miles to save $2 means you're losing $2 based on the cost of gas.

Seriously, thoug, it sounds like you're on the correct path. My stock advice is to test ride multiple bikes in a proximity of your price range. Determine which bike\brand feels best to you.
 

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In that price point, if you have a Specialized dealer in the area try out the FSR XC Expert (1750) or the Comp (1500). Its a great entry full suspension, IMO. As stated above, make sure you get a test ride, whichever way you go. The geometry on all of the bikes is different, even if minimal (in some cases extreme).

Also, if you buy a Specialized thety are offering up to $250 in Specialized equiptment/gear ($150 for the FSR price range).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Where are my manners?
Here are the links in question:
http://www.ibexbikes.com/Bikes/ASTA-PRO-Details.html
http://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/bikes/08_bikes/08parker2.html

I'm not stuck so much at THIS ~$1700 price point, as I don't even know that I am able to appreciate what this kind of money gets me. Being honest with myself, I am likely not to advance past an intermediate skill level, so I'm looking for VALUE at this price point in a stock bike, since I don't really want to spend my time upgrading, +/- a few hundred bucks. Yes, this is vague, but I my guess it also discourages suggestions of buying a lower-end bike from a big-name company, which is also partly my goal.

Thanks fellas.
 

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Test ride as many bikes as possible before making a decision.
as far as what to look for in the feel of a FS bike
You want to be able to pedal the bike without feeling alot of bobbing.
A good FS bike will smooth out the trail without making you constantly aware that the back end is actually moving.
Hope this helped.
 

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Between the two bikes you mention (the ibex and jamis), you've selected bikes designed for completely different purposes. The Ibex is more XC with the 71.5 degree headangle and 100mm front/rear suspension. The Jamis is more (to quote Jamis) "gate racing, jumping, slopestyle". They then throw in 'all day trail riding'. It has a 68 degree headangle and a long travel front fork which is more jumping/all-mountain/downhill.

Also take into account the weights of each, the Ibex states 26.5 pounds (in reality maybe more like 28-29), while the Jamis is 36 pounds which is heavy. You'll find out very quickly that you don't want to be pedaling around a 36 pound bike for very long.

Both have four bar rear suspension, but both have the pivot above the axle on the seatstay so they don't violate the Horst patents. So the rear suspension on these will be decent, but arguably not the best.

The suggestions above to look at the Specialized FXR and the Cannondale Rush are good ones. In addition, there are some good deals at www.rscycle.com on Ironhorse Azure or MKIII bikes. The FXR, Rush, and those IH bikes have very good rear suspensions and are good handling bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Excellent! That is exactly what I've been looking for. So, Whitedog, what's the difference b/t XC and "all day trail riding"? So the Jamis is more of a AM (suggested by its weight)?

Although I do have a Motobecane outlet in town, the forums I've seen have not been enthusiastic about the components the company DOESN'T emphasize. THey do have Fuji, so I may look into them.

Thanks again
 

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I'm making some broad definitions here, and maybe someone can chime in also: XC bikes usually have around 3-4" travel and have lighter frames components so the bike is lighter (range maybe from 24 to 28 lbs), and the geometry angles usually favor technical handling. Trail and all-mountain usually ups the suspension travel an inch or two more and frame is built to handle a broader range of things including faster downhills and rocks and small drops and such, and some have slacker headtube angle geometry for stability. The trail and AM bikes usually weigh a few more pounds than the true XC bikes (range say from 27 to 31 lbs). Then there's the DH (DownHill) type bikes that have more suspension and stronger frames and geometry for downhill stability, and these bike are heavier (35 to 45lbs), and also there's the dirt jump catagory that have stiff heavy frames and such to take the abuse so they are more in the 35 lb range.

The DH and Dirt Jump bikes don't have geometry/seat position that would make you comfortable on long rides, plus the extra weight will tire you out, so it would be best to stick to the XC/Trail/AM catagory for your 1st full suspension was the point I was trying to get across.
 
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