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I have been riding a Fisher GS Tassahara Large for a few years and will be purchasing a full suspension bike soon. I Test rode a medium womens FSR Stump Jumper and am very impressed with the ride. Had to replace the stock 90 mm stem with a 110 mm riser stem to get the proper reach for the test ride. It fit ok but any more seat post extension and the bike will feel a little unstable. I am 5' 71/2" tall and have a 31" inseam. I wonder if the large will be a better fit. Can't find a large to test ride. Any Stump Jumper fit advise would be appreciated.
 

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ballbuster
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Could be...

catflopsy said:
I have been riding a Fisher GS Tassahara Large for a few years and will be purchasing a full suspension bike soon. I Test rode a medium womens FSR Stump Jumper and am very impressed with the ride. Had to replace the stock 90 mm stem with a 110 mm riser stem to get the proper reach for the test ride. It fit ok but any more seat post extension and the bike will feel a little unstable. I am 5' 71/2" tall and have a 31" inseam. I wonder if the large will be a better fit. Can't find a large to test ride. Any Stump Jumper fit advise would be appreciated.
... but you are taller than the average American woman. If you have a 31" inseam, I would also guess you have longer arms than average, as the longer stem would indicate. You may wanna try a medium non-WSD frame. Prolly a lot easier to find in stock somewhere. The WSD designs tend to lean towards folks with more torso and shorter reach, which it sounds like you don't have.
 

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Pimpbot is on it.

I fit bicycles for a living, Specialized being one of the brands.

At yor height and reach, try a couple of standard geo. frames. THe WSD designs tend to be geared to shorter (height and reach)riders than you.

THe bars are sometimes narrower, the brake levers are short throw levers for smaller hands. Some of the upper end suspension units are valved for the lighter riders as well.

Do not overlook standard frames at your height.

If you are semi happy with the fit of the bike you are on now, take a tape measure and measure the Top Tube length. Compare it to the chart for the bike you are looking at if you can not test ride it.
 

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Sorry, but my statement stands.

stripes said:
I disagree: do not overlook standard frames at ANY height.

I ride a standard frame, 13". Top tube length made all the difference to me.

Test ride a lot of different bikes, and find one that fits :)
There are a few riders out there that simply can not ride std. frames. I have a client that is 4-11, and BARELY is able to straddle an XS Fuel EX-7 WSD. (Perfect for a custom frame, but unwilling to spend the $)

I agree about trying as many bikes as possible, and that TT length is THE critical point for fit. (Generally)

Then again, what do I know. I only do this type of thing (with those bikes) for a living.
 

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Not for a second.

I am in no way trying to pick a fight either. Sorry if you took me the wrong way.

I agreed with your statement for the most part.

The OP is 5'7". She really needs to try out some standard frames, for sure.
 

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fishercat said:
i would check out the mens medium
FWIW: I rode a rented 2006 men's medium fsr (not stumpy) all last week. I happen to have a 31" inseam (guy), and I could not get the seatpost extension needed even when provided with longer (long) post (sorry; not sure what length). I rode the bike all week 1" over minimum insertion! (Despite bad tires and some parts three levels below my own bike, it performed well.)
 

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They are coming around.

stripes said:
No worries. Thanks for clarifying.

The thing that toasts me about WSD bikes is they tend to have lower quality components for the same price, just because the frame is a different geometry.

Dunno.. maybe bike manufacturers have gotten a clue about that. Fisher didn't back when I had my Sugar and Big Sur.
It still happens, or they do not make the upper end models at all in the WSD.

THere are a few that are spec'd the same, like the EX-& from Trek I mentioned earlier.
 

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My experience, FWIW

I am probably built similar to the OP, I'm a little taller (5'9") and 33" inseam.

MOST of the WSD are too small for me. Even the larges.

MOST of the standard frames require too much reach. I have long arms for a girl, but my husband (6' tall) has the same inseam that I do, but 3" more torso and 2-3" longer arms!

I'm too tall for WSD, but standard frames don't often fit well either. I ended up deciding on a Rocky Mountain Element 19", which has a relatively short TT for a standard design. my advice is to ride a lot of bikes and then come home and compare the specs, it's exhausting but it can help you find the right bike. And try a Rocky! Couldn't be happier with mine. Several people also recommended the Santa Cruz Juliana, but that was out of my budget.
 

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catflopsy said:
I have been riding a Fisher GS Tassahara Large for a few years and will be purchasing a full suspension bike soon. I Test rode a medium womens FSR Stump Jumper and am very impressed with the ride. Had to replace the stock 90 mm stem with a 110 mm riser stem to get the proper reach for the test ride. It fit ok but any more seat post extension and the bike will feel a little unstable. I am 5' 71/2" tall and have a 31" inseam. I wonder if the large will be a better fit. Can't find a large to test ride. Any Stump Jumper fit advise would be appreciated.
Don't get a WSD, get a men's bike. The 'special' frame mods they claim to make you can do yourself with a stem swap. "women's" bikes are NEVER high end models and only good if you're really short, but small men's bikes usually do the trick.

My 5'10'' sister rides men's bikes since you can't get a high end WSD rig, or find one in a L frame in most stores.
 

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PapaLegba said:
Don't get a WSD, get a men's bike. The 'special' frame mods they claim to make you can do yourself with a stem swap. "women's" bikes are NEVER high end models and only good if you're really short, but small men's bikes usually do the trick.

My 5'10'' sister rides men's bikes since you can't get a high end WSD rig, or find one in a L frame in most stores.
The 'special' frame mods they claim to make you can do yourself with a stem swap.

That is just not correct. The theory behind WSD, is an altered frame geometry geared towards tendencies in female proportions. Depending on which brand, the altered frame geometry is designed for someone with longer legs, shorter torso, and shorter arms, typically petite but not always. For some women, the slight changes in the frame make a huge difference in fit and enjoyment of the bike. This is in addition to a female saddle, sometimes smaller brake levers, and a different crank length, which are changes that can be done to any bike.

There are a few high end WSDs ( Santa Cruz comes to mind) so they do exist, there is just not a lot of selection. Poster is correct in that for larger/taller women, there really isn't much to choose from.

~formica
 

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Cannondale's Feminine altered frame geometry: shorter top tube, longer head tube.

WSD is not much different, having pored over their geometries. It's a bunch of smoke and mirrors.

You can fix that with a shorter stem with a steeper rise angle.
 

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stripes said:
Actually, it is different, but it doesn't fit everyone (be it female or male). The smoke and mirrors part is the fact you pay more for the different geometry frame with lesser grade parts. :madmax:

I also have a problem with the just-slap-a-shorter-stem on a larger frame mentality. Usually a shorter stem means I'm still too stretched out and not fitted right. I'm sure other women go through that too. I don't feel like I'm fitted right if I have to have a "baby stem" on my bike. It's not always the right thing to do.:nono:

For an XC bike, most folks, no matter what they're sex, should be riding with the right size frame first BEFORE messing with the stem.

I've bought too many bikes in the past because everyone did the just slap a shorter stem nonsense on it. I don't think that's a fair way to judge frame size.

Besides, the OP may need a smaller frame and longer stem :p
Well, yes and no.

The only way to see if a bike fits is to straddle the frame and see if you like it in the dirt. I prefer smaller frames with longer stems and the saddle jacked up high versus a larger frame that has a higher center of gravity.

I'll tell my sister you think of her short Diabolus stem on her Ellsworth Truth as a "baby stem.":D
 

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One problem that I encountered when trying to ride a bike with a shorter stem is that it does affect the steering. Especially for someone with reduced upper body strength (as most women have), I found the bike more difficult to control with a shorter stem, because you are closer to the axis point of the steering and it takes more strength and control to steer with a shorter stem. So while I agree this is an option to consider, it is not without drawbacks IME.
 

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formica said:
The 'special' frame mods they claim to make you can do yourself with a stem swap.
That is just not correct. The theory behind WSD, is an altered frame geometry geared towards tendencies in female proportions. Depending on which brand, the altered frame geometry is designed for someone with longer legs, shorter torso, and shorter arms, typically petite but not always. For some women, the slight changes in the frame make a huge difference in fit and enjoyment of the bike. This is in addition to a female saddle, sometimes smaller brake levers, and a different crank length, which are changes that can be done to any bike.
There are a few high end WSDs ( Santa Cruz comes to mind) so they do exist, there is just not a lot of selection. Poster is correct in that for larger/taller women, there really isn't much to choose from.
~formica
I am 5'9" with a long torso. I rode a Santa Cruz Juliana hardtail (not made anymore) in a Large frame. I like to think that this frame was availale in a large worked becuase it was designed by Julie Furtado, and she is a big girl. Few other Women's Specific bikes come in large.

The first time I rode this frame, I knew this was "it". I was not getting the same feeling with men's frames, which technically were supposed to fit me, but I always felt incredibly (and uncomfortably) streched out. I like a more upright riding position and I think all of the bikes I was seeing then were NORBA-type racer bikes - low handlebars, long tup tube.

I'm really interested in the GIANT Women's Trance. Seems like it would be a VERY sweet trail bike. Anybody tried one?
 
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