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Discussion Starter #1
When you want to stay out a while big panniers are a must. Sure, you can pack light, but if you were to go with huge panniers does anyone have any suggestions?

Here is one that I like...

vaude-karakorum-pannier-black-anthracite-stock.jpg

Thanks...
 

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When you want to stay out a while big panniers are a must. Sure, you can pack light, but if you were to go with huge panniers does anyone have any suggestions?

Here is one that I like...


Thanks...
Hola OldschoolReloaded,

How long is staying out a while?
For 5 month on the road (carrying a portable photo studio with a printer) I'm only planning to add micro-panniers (Arkel's Dry Lites or Porcelain Rocket's) to a "classic" bikepacking setup (handlebar bag, gas tank bag, salsa anything cages' bags, frame bag, seat bag, & a small backpack).

Arkel - Dry-Lites - Ultralite Saddle bags - ONLY 454gr!!

Introducing Micro Panniers | Custom Bicycle Bags - The Porcelain Rocket

Saludos,
Federico
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well more than 5 months...
Thanks for the links...Arkel makes good stuff. I will need to put together my gear and see how much space I will need, but I am sure that big will most likely be the direction I will need to go.
 

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My XtraCycle (freeradical extension... see 'cargo bike')is hands down my favorite touring rig... massive capacity. Its been on some nasty trail rides... including most recently the Kokopelli Trail.
For road touring, I'd be very interested in the XtraCycle Edgerunner. I also have a Yuba Mundo... it hasn't been out on tour yet.
If you are sticking with a standard Panier system - I'd just go with the Standard Orlieb bags and strap a dry bag ontop thus avoiding the complex bags you pictured above - too many zippers!
 

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When you want to stay out a while big panniers are a must.
I don't think that's a given at all. So many people have toured for month after months with soft bikepacking bags.

Personally I'm good for 7 days between resupply without resorting to anything beyond soft frame bags.

Lots of people also tour with 4 panniers and a bar bag in the traditional "fully loaded" format, but that is a choice not a necessity.
 

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I fail to understand how duration can have such a vast effect on bag size. I have actually had this conversation with multiple people with traditional touring setups and still don't understand it.

Sure, if I were going out for multiple seasons I'd need a few more clothes but I feel like I could easily fit everything I'd need in a couple small panniers and my normal BP bags. I'm actually looking for a reason to get some Rogue Panda Silos, though waterproof would be nice.

But for shear size I think the Jandd Mountain Expeditions take the cake, and gosh do they make for an unpleasant looking ride. I can just imagine one with nothing more then a full sized pillow and still space to spare.
 

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Someone on the forum mentioned that one of the weaknesses of a waterproof bag like the Ortlieb and others is that the stuff inside that is wet from sweat or rain while out of the bag, never has a chance to dry.
Why isn't anyone making bags from Gore-tex or one of the knock offs? Would that allow the internal freight to dry out?
 

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I guess if you want to take lots of stuff you have to haul it around... I am in the middle, I am trying to downsize my stuff but I take lots of photography gear and electronics. These days quality equipment is so small and light that you can get by nicely with minimal stuff.

One thing that saves weight is trying to mount the stuff on your bike without panniers and that also reduces the need for racks which further saves weight. I got rid of my front rack and replaced with a homemade bent aluminum minimalist "rack" that just allows me to strap some stuff sackss up against the side of the fork -- huge weight saving, plus it has the advantage that the weight is right up near the steering pivot so there is less inertia which slows down steering.

Strap stuff to your handlebars, and there are little bags that strap to your top tube. Get a frame bag, that is valuable space, put your water bottle somewhere else like on your front fork or under the downtube if you have the brazeons. Some people like the seatbags but I still prefer the rear rack and panniers because I can throw stuff on top in between and I like the different compartments of rear panniers. But if going ultralight I might be pursuaded to get rid of the rear rack and get a seatbag. I guess you should always try to push yourself outside your comfort zone...

And of course a small backpack isn't too much of a burden and allows you to carry stuff easily away from the bike. It's fun trying to downsize your gear, part of the challenge is doing it cheaply.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
When preparing my first (and only) cross country I set out the basics for the trip, tent, bag, pad, stove...ect ect. I also carried a notebook as I was blogging, and since I was traveling roads that barely had towns I carried a Goal Zero. Well this overfilled all the room that panniers had in a hurry, so I made a trailer. That was a mistake. But I have learned from that experience and my gear is now much more compact. I am waiting on an ultralight quilt to arrive that will pack to the size of a grapefruit. Still, for me the bulk of the stuff, rather than the shear weight, is what fills the pack. If I was able to credit card tour that would be much easier, but since my plan is to be in the back-country as much as possible I need more stuff. Who knows though...I am now trying ascertain just how small the pack can be, which will ultimately dictate what I can bring. The thing I learned with bike camping is that there are days when the wind was so bad I could not ride, period. When in a camp for a few days you need supplies, much less the water you need to carry. So I err on the side of caution and get the biggest pack.

Thanks for all your comments....
 

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Years ago, I toured a little with "heavy" gear. Big tent, stove, extra clothes, etc. Made for some great camping, but less fun on the bike.

When I started ultra-racing, I stripped down to just the essentials. Bivy bag, no tent, no extra clothes, etc. Makes for great riding, but uncomfortable camping.

Both styles are great, depending on what floats your boat for a particular moment.
 

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Someone on the forum mentioned that one of the weaknesses of a waterproof bag like the Ortlieb and others is that the stuff inside that is wet from sweat or rain while out of the bag, never has a chance to dry.
Why isn't anyone making bags from Gore-tex or one of the knock offs? Would that allow the internal freight to dry out?
Lash wet stuff outside and get it over with. If it's wet out nothing will dry in a packed bag. I'll keep my bombproof Ortleibs, thanks. Even without the mesh pockets.
 

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Guess I would look at the Arkel's or Jandd for a mountain bike frame.

That said, I have plenty of room with my Porcelain Rocket Micro Panniers which are very light weight, 20-24 liters each and handle Any single track out there along route and strapping anything else on top my rack if needed.

More room needed yet (though it has not come up) my back pack for some more light clothes,food,etc.

I like certain panniers made for MTB's/Adventure tour,etc. and Certain frame/bike pack bags yet,,,,,,,,,,the last thing I want personally is big , heavy, suitcase panniers on an adventure tour bike outing............which posting on a mountain bike forum.........is certainly the normal mindset

BTW- those Vaudes you posted really are not what I would call "big"....they look like front panniers to me with a fitted bag a top and they are a little to Urban/Slick for a Adventure Tour - If you want something like that have a look at Arkel MTB specific and Jandd stuff = made for MTB . It's quite a bit better .......dirt/mtb specific than those........if your really going on a big expedition of some sort
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Anyone have experience with Arkel's Dolphin 48 touring bags? I am concerned about heel strike and whether or not you can slide them back far enough to prevent it.

Thanks....
 

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Anyone have experience with Arkel's Dolphin 48 touring bags? I am concerned about heel strike and whether or not you can slide them back far enough to prevent it.
Thanks....
Heel clearance depends on shoe size, frame type/type, rack size/type, etc. What works great for one person might not for another. If you can find a pair locally so you can try before buying is always a good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Heel clearance depends on shoe size, frame type/type, rack size/type, etc. What works great for one person might not for another. If you can find a pair locally so you can try before buying is always a good idea.
Yeah that stands to reason...I do have big feet. But this is why I want to see if someone actually owns these.
 

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OldschoolRelo, G'day.

I've Vaude Roadmaster panniers. They're similar to those that you posted (mine are Black and Anthracite) but mine do not take the zip-on top compartment. I like to ride for up to 8 weeks at a time, without a need to resupply.

I looked at both Arkel (good quality but too expensive in Oz) and the Ortleib roll top panniers (too many failures off-road with the Ortleibs that I've read about while researching them), so I chose the Vaudes because of the price and the seperate pockets that I could return specific items to and their apparent fine quality. The three outer pockets are a convenient time saver. The panniers come with rain/dust jackets. When a jacket gets damaged, from stacking the bike, or caught on rocks, I repair any tears or holes with yacht spinnacker tape, that I purchased from a boat chandler or marine marine supplier. I do use high-tech waterproof inners for each of the panniers ... 50 cent garbage bin liners.

Maintenance day. Repairing holes on a rain/dust jacket using spinnaker tape.




Vaude Road Master Bar Box with removable map window.




I've had the Vaudes for about 5 years. I try to keep them clean and dust free because I carry several bits of camera gear. They've seen much work. I've taken several long trips mostly on Australia's Bicentennial National Trail and they have not failed in any aspect. Not in the fabric or the webbing, none of the rivets on the back plate have pulled or loosened, the back plate with hangers and fittings have not faultered or distorted nor the zips (there are 3 zips to three individual pockets, a choke string and pair of pull-downs closes the main compartment) nor one loose stitch on a seam. I've 4 Roadmaster panniers and a Vaude Road Master Bar Box. The panniers came with different hanger inserts to cater for different diameter tubing of pannier racks.

I haul an Extrawheel Voyager Solo trailer (only 2.5kg), for the two heaviest panniers (about 25kg), which keeps the majority of the weight off the bike.






Formally dressed, with the rain/dust coats on .... I've a hi-vis pannier pig.




You mentioned heal strike, the hangers can be slid forward or back on the pannier back plate and then tightened, to give good clearance.


Warren.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks Warren...I would have liked to have read your review a few days back. I just bought the Ortlieb Classic Roll-top panniers in red. Honestly, I just got a good deal on them and decided to go that route. They seem fine, and I have used a roll-top backpack for years so I have some experience with the design. I got the back-rollers and the front-rollers and also got a small Ortlieb Rack Pack from across the pond, which will mount across the top of the rear bags. I have test mounted the bags and they don't mount that well to my Jandd racks, as Ortlieb does not have an adapter that fits these racks tightly. I am going to do a test load soon and may post pictures.

Thanks for all the pics....good riding.
 
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