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back in the saddle again
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone here use Trimble Outdoors on their Verizon phone? I'm trying to decide between downloading the app for my enV Touch, or if an on-bike computer would be better. I'm looking to track how far I go, how fast I'm going, and I haven't really decided what else, yet. I also have a Garmin nuvi which I was thinking about trying to mount to my bike and operate on battery power. My goal with biking again is to do it for fun and fitness, but I don't count calories or get too much into the 'stats' of my workout.

Thanks for your insights!
 

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since 4/10/2009
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34,384 Posts
Please, whatever you do, don't use a Nuvi on your bike. The battery life is worse than a phone and it's not even going to be remotely resistant to water. Most phones at least have cases available that will protect them. Even buried in a pack, you'll need something to keep water off of it because if you live in a wet climate, it'll be sooner rather than later that you'll get caught out in the rain.

As for Trimble Outdoors phone apps, I have not heard much of people here using them. It's more common for the hiking folks to use their phone apps, since the website is promoted by Backpacker Magazine. Some folks here do occasionally post activities from Trimble Outdoors, though, because you can use the site with a regular GPS.

If all you want is to know how fast you're going and how far you're going, you might want to consider a basic cyclocomputer. $25-$30 should get you set with a basic unit that will give you those numbers and a few others.

If you want to use a phone app, you have to be concerned with whether you have a solid GPS signal, you have to be concerned with battery life, because GPS apps notoriously drain the battery, you have to be concerned with how your chosen app accesses maps (whether it can cache them or whether it must do live downloads from the internet), and you have to be concerned with protecting the phone.

And with your particular phone model, I'll venture that its GPS receiver is not very good. More expensive smartphone GPS receivers still aren't as good as a dedicated GPS, but they're getting there. Yours...I'd be leery. With an old, sketchy GPS receiver, you'll get more accurate speed/distance if you got a basic cyclocomputer.

You could still carry the phone and app for recording purposes and compare it to where you actually went and the stats from the other computer.

Many phone users would like to upgrade to a dedicated GPS later, anyway.
 
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