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monster member
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Not everything has weight mentioned anywhere.
You can usually find it with some work. Different selling sites are better than others at listing weights. Or search in forums like this. If you absolutely can't find it, then it's probably bad and you should steer clear from that item.
 

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I don't get punctures too often, BUT we have a lot of what you seem to call Black Locust in the U.S., and those caused me several headaches over the past few years with their microscopic thorns that go through absolutely anything.
So I both do get punctures and I don't.
Tubeless would definitely solve this particular problem for good I think.

It's down to the idling then I guess. But the trail bike will easily sit idle for two weeks before I get the chance to go riding somewhere. Where I live it's XC at best (mostly agricultural lowlands), I'd need to join someone with a truck or take train to get anywhere meaningful for such a bike, so... I guess tubes it is :(
If you're worried about mess & changing tyres, just run sealant in tubes. Works as well as tubeless, no mess. I've run like that for about 5 years now, zero issues. Giving proper tubeless a go now.
 

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Ian Limburg
*Custom* 2016 Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt 770 MSL
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57 Posts
After half a year of waiting for the frame to be available (small local manufacturer), the bike is finally finished, and I am somewhat bummed over the weight. It's 130+120mm travel trail bike, and it came down to whopping 15,3kg.
It's not like I can't grab it and run up some stairs with it with my 96kg, but I expected it to be a lot less.
It's what is and I'm not going to start messing around a brand new bike, but I am curious if it's possible to noticeably reduce the weight even in theory.
The frame itself is 2,9kg.
fork: Auron35 Boost
shock: SR TriAir
wheels: Remerx RX2027, tubes (I don't like tubeless)
RF Turbine R 35 stem+handlebar
drivetrain: 1x12 mixture of Shimano SLX and XT
brakes: four piston SLX, 180mm rotors
seatpost: Pro Koryak (what on Earth is that? can't find any info about this...)
RF Chester pedals

That's pretty much it components-wise.
Obviously the fork is fairly heavy (2,1kg or something) and the wheels too, but I wanted to make no compromises with major components, the bike being built more around going down than up :D

The only thing I can think of that could save weight are some lightweight super hi-tech wheels, but that sort of stuff also cost a kidney and a half I guess.
Going carbon handlebar+stem would likely save me maybe 150g at a significant price tag, so that's pointless even in theory.
Aside from these, I have absolutely no idea if there's any possibility to shed some 1kg off the thing.

Let the theorycrafting begin!
Anyone has any ideas?

P.S. Admire the pure sexiness of matte yellow frame that will turn permanently brown after the first ride.
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Let me just say your bike isn't that heavy. I race for NICA and my first year I raced a 38 pound hardtail! It was insanity. It was a indestructible but insanely heavy. Your weight for that bike isn't bad at all especially being aluminum with some beefy shocks on it.
 

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¯\_(ツ)_/¯
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Let me just say your bike isn't that heavy. I race for NICA and my first year I raced a 38 pound hardtail! It was insanity. It was a indestructible but insanely heavy. Your weight for that bike isn't bad at all especially being aluminum with some beefy shocks on it.
38lb Hard Tail??? How is that even possible?

Cast Iron Frame?
 

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38lb Hard Tail??? How is that even possible?

Cast Iron Frame?

I had a Surly Pugsley back in the day. It weighed close to forty pounds. It had big rims and fat tires. But yeah, you have to work pretty hard to make your hardtail weigh 38 pounds. Wal Mart bikes don't even weight that much. I could build a hardtail from my parts bin tomorrow if I bought a cheap frame and I don't think I could get it over thirty pounds even with a steel frame and fork.
 

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¯\_(ツ)_/¯
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I had a Surly Pugsley back in the day. It weighed close to forty pounds. It had big rims and fat tires. But yeah, you have to work pretty hard to make your hardtail weigh 38 pounds. Wal Mart bikes don't even weight that much. I could build a hardtail from my parts bin tomorrow if I bought a cheap frame and I don't think I could get it over thirty pounds even with a steel frame and fork.
a fat bike i understand, they are built a bit differently.

My Fuji City bike is pretty dang heavy. I have not weighed it, but I should.

1910504
 

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I wouldn't call myself a "weight weenie" and I'm not obsessed about a few ounces. At some point however you have to think about the weight of your bike unless you like to suffer unnecessarily or are just ambling along on flat bike paths. The difference in cost between a 20 pound build and a 27 pound build is significant. But past that? It probably costs very little to keep your hardtail under 27 pounds. Certainly the difference between 30 and 38 is only a couple of bucks.

My Pinion/belt drive bikepacking race bike weighs 27 pounds. With all of my gear I'm pushing 45 pounds. I can most definitely feel the difference between this and my 24 pound hardtail. It's not subtle.
 

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Indeed it is. The rims and tires on it are so heavy it is crazy slow to accelerate.
I guess it would be okay if you had a lot of flat ground or shuttle rides. I'd very much hate to pedal that up a mountain.
 
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