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I just don't like the idea of tubeless. For one, I heard it's not lighter at all (no idea if that is true or not), but most importantly, I hate the entire concept. Just the fact you can't let the bike sit for a while, otherwise you need to change the milk, which looks like a horrible mess of a job. I also heard the stuff leaks through the tires no matter what you do.
Tubeless has a noticeable performance advantage. You should definitely try it. Once you do you probably won't go back.
 

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We'll let Seth settle this argument re, tubeless saving weight...


Sent from my HD1900 using Tapatalk
 

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We'll let Seth settle this argument re, tubeless saving weight...


Sent from my HD1900 using Tapatalk



Yep, pretty easy to weigh a tube and subtract 3 oz of sealant to find the difference, ~150 grams per wheel is about what I expected. Seth was wrong about one thing though, there was no gorilla tape on that rim.
 

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I'm currently running tubeless on the front and a tube in the rear. I seem to have knackered the sidewalls of my back tire to the extent that it just won't seal anymore. So much for pinchflat protection. Once the tread wears out, then I'll go back to tubeless on it.
 

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Not bashing the OP since a lot of people probably do it, but complaining about the weight after buying everything is way too late. Need to add up the weights before buying everything so you know where you'll be. That gives you options to step up from a GX to an XX or from alu bar to a CF bar or whatever you might choose to reach a certain weight goal. Or maybe you see on paper that it's too costly to reach a certain weight goal, and then you accept the weight for more strength and lower cost.
 

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After half a year of waiting for the frame to be available (small local manufacturer), the bike is finally finished, and I am somewhat bummed over the weight. It's 130+120mm travel trail bike, and it came down to whopping 15,3kg.
It's not like I can't grab it and run up some stairs with it with my 96kg, but I expected it to be a lot less.
It's what is and I'm not going to start messing around a brand new bike, but I am curious if it's possible to noticeably reduce the weight even in theory.
The frame itself is 2,9kg.
fork: Auron35 Boost
shock: SR TriAir
wheels: Remerx RX2027, tubes (I don't like tubeless)
RF Turbine R 35 stem+handlebar
drivetrain: 1x12 mixture of Shimano SLX and XT
brakes: four piston SLX, 180mm rotors
seatpost: Pro Koryak (what on Earth is that? can't find any info about this...)
RF Chester pedals

That's pretty much it components-wise.
Obviously the fork is fairly heavy (2,1kg or something) and the wheels too, but I wanted to make no compromises with major components, the bike being built more around going down than up :D

The only thing I can think of that could save weight are some lightweight super hi-tech wheels, but that sort of stuff also cost a kidney and a half I guess.
Going carbon handlebar+stem would likely save me maybe 150g at a significant price tag, so that's pointless even in theory.
Aside from these, I have absolutely no idea if there's any possibility to shed some 1kg off the thing.

Let the theorycrafting begin!
Anyone has any ideas?

P.S. Admire the pure sexiness of matte yellow frame that will turn permanently brown after the first ride.
View attachment 1908262


That is not heavy..... Try doing this:

1909119



Only adds about 20-30lbs to the bike, weight that wiggles and fights you trying to control the bike at slow speeds.....

But it can be a blast:
1909121
 

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Cycologist
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^ Get that kid some gloves! :p

I never tried that but I had a couple of those tag-along third wheels. Especially pulling with a road bike, the kid's shift in weight took some getting used to, especially when getting started. Once I kept hearing this whirring sound. I asked my son what it was. "my foot on your tire".
 

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^ Get that kid some gloves! :p

I never tried that but I had a couple of those tag-along third wheels. Especially pulling with a road bike, the kid's shift in weight took some getting used to, especially when getting started. Once I kept hearing this whirring sound. I asked my son what it was. "my foot on your tire".
1909129


Oh yeah, been there. Luckily my son is pedaling himself now, so I won't be towing him around when we go ride this afternoon. 2 kids on a 7-speed city cruiser is a bit of a work out... lol.
 

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That is not heavy..... Try doing this:
Yep! I recently bought a Shotgun Seat for our twu year old daughter, she's only about 11-12kg plus another couple of kilos for the seat, but man you notice the difference in climbs!! She absolutely loves it though, especially going fast(ish) on the flow trails.
 

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Yep! I recently bought a Shotgun Seat for our twu year old daughter, she's only about 11-12kg plus another couple of kilos for the seat, but man you notice the difference in climbs!! She absolutely loves it though, especially going fast(ish) on the flow trails.
Awesome! Post up some pics!

You really notice it on the days when you do over 1k of elevation gain.......
 

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Discussion Starter #73
Not bashing the OP since a lot of people probably do it, but complaining about the weight after buying everything is way too late. Need to add up the weights before buying everything so you know where you'll be. That gives you options to step up from a GX to an XX or from alu bar to a CF bar or whatever you might choose to reach a certain weight goal. Or maybe you see on paper that it's too costly to reach a certain weight goal, and then you accept the weight for more strength and lower cost.
Not everything has weight mentioned anywhere.
 

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Having a lighter bicycle that performs well requires careful consideration of each individual component that is selected and should result in a bike that performs better not worse, if done correctly. An X01 cassette is lighter AND has more longevity than a GX cassette. The only downside to the X01 is cost.

You'd have to be pretty lethargic to not take the essentially free and significant rotating weight savings of tubeless wheels AND dramatically better performance. But whatever floats your boat.

Shopping, considering and searching for the best choice in a component is not for everyone. But heavy bike owners love to make the claim that light bikes don't perform well, when that simply isn't reality. But say what you must to feel better, just know that you aren't being honest with yourself.
 

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Ahhh but just changing your gruppo alone won't make a heavy bike light.

Saving weight is about analyzing each component and saving weight where you can. One change doesn't make a bike significantly lighter but 25 seemingly inconsequential changes makes a real difference in ride feel and speed overall. It seems that those with heavy bikes seem to think it's an all or nothing proposition, but nothing is further from the truth. You simply save weight where you can,and take the weight penalty where you must for cost or performance reasons.

There are built E29s on this forum that weigh 31#s with a coil shock, and my buddy has the same bike with an air shock that weighs 37#s. I assure you that the 37# bike isn't better for how either of these riders use them it just cost a couple of grand less to build.
 

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Saving weight is about analyzing each component and saving weight where you can. One change doesn't make a bike significantly lighter but 25 seemingly inconsequential changes makes a real difference in ride feel and speed overall. It seems that those with heavy bikes seem to think it's an all or nothing proposition, but nothing is further from the truth. You simply save weight where you can,and take the weight penalty where you must for cost or performance reasons.

There are built E29s on this forum that weigh 31#s with a coil shock, and my buddy has the same bike with an air shock that weighs 37#s. I assure you that the 37# bike isn't better for how either of these riders use them it just cost a couple of grand less to build.
I probably make it sound like I add weight to my bike without any rhyme or reason but that's not true. I do look at weights and it needs to be reasonable. If there's nothing to gain by using something heavier than of course I'm not going to use it. I definitely focus on a light cassette, hubs, and derailleur that fit in my budget to keep unsprung weight low. Saddle and handlebars are a great place to shave weight without sacreficing performance provided you won't snap the bars mid ride but their effect is also pretty minimal. Same goes for the crank.

I am going to throw rear hub weight out the window with an Onyx rear hub. I want the soft, instant engaugement and silent costing. I think the recent addition of a coil shock will compensate a bit and still perform way better than an air shock did with my lightish DT 350 hubs. It will bring my total bike weight to 34.7lbs or so but I'm on 27.5 wheels.

I think the OP has a solid build and at his weight he doesn't need to be sacreficing strength anywhere. I'm a little surprised his bike weighs in at that much compared to mine but maybe one of our scales are off or something.
 

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Saving weight is about analyzing each component and saving weight where you can. One change doesn't make a bike significantly lighter but 25 seemingly inconsequential changes makes a real difference in ride feel and speed overall. It seems that those with heavy bikes seem to think it's an all or nothing proposition, but nothing is further from the truth. You simply save weight where you can,and take the weight penalty where you must for cost or performance reasons.

There are built E29s on this forum that weigh 31#s with a coil shock, and my buddy has the same bike with an air shock that weighs 37#s. I assure you that the 37# bike isn't better for how either of these riders use them it just cost a couple of grand less to build.
Agreed, but you really need to start planning this before the build, generally with the frame selection. A good chunk of this comes from having some experience building a bike. I think the OPs observations about the major weight adders are correct. Wheels and fork (assuming the same frame) would go the biggest distance. Tires are another place, assuming you can find lighter ones that do what you need.

There are places I'm perfectly happy to 'waste' weight on, and there are things I'll buy that are lighter NOT because they're lighter, such as carbon bars. A lot of where, and what, that is is due to what I've learned about me.. and my bikes.. and my riding.
 
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