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Discussion Starter #1
After half a year of waiting for the frame to be available (small local manufacturer), the bike is finally finished, and I am somewhat bummed over the weight. It's 130+120mm travel trail bike, and it came down to whopping 15,3kg.
It's not like I can't grab it and run up some stairs with it with my 96kg, but I expected it to be a lot less.
It's what is and I'm not going to start messing around a brand new bike, but I am curious if it's possible to noticeably reduce the weight even in theory.
The frame itself is 2,9kg.
fork: Auron35 Boost
shock: SR TriAir
wheels: Remerx RX2027, tubes (I don't like tubeless)
RF Turbine R 35 stem+handlebar
drivetrain: 1x12 mixture of Shimano SLX and XT
brakes: four piston SLX, 180mm rotors
seatpost: Pro Koryak (what on Earth is that? can't find any info about this...)
RF Chester pedals

That's pretty much it components-wise.
Obviously the fork is fairly heavy (2,1kg or something) and the wheels too, but I wanted to make no compromises with major components, the bike being built more around going down than up :D

The only thing I can think of that could save weight are some lightweight super hi-tech wheels, but that sort of stuff also cost a kidney and a half I guess.
Going carbon handlebar+stem would likely save me maybe 150g at a significant price tag, so that's pointless even in theory.
Aside from these, I have absolutely no idea if there's any possibility to shed some 1kg off the thing.

Let the theorycrafting begin!
Anyone has any ideas?

P.S. Admire the pure sexiness of matte yellow frame that will turn permanently brown after the first ride.
1908262
 

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Oh goody. Subscribed. I have no input. I did the same thing and ended up at 16.75 kg. Man.

But I am coil front and back and DH tires, so i guess i could start there. Sounds like you have those bases checked.
Hubs and cassette? RD generally weighs a chunk too?

you could ditch the dropper and use a qr bolt :)
 

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After half a year of waiting for the frame to be available (small local manufacturer), the bike is finally finished, and I am somewhat bummed over the weight. It's 130+120mm travel trail bike, and it came down to whopping 15,3kg.
It's not like I can't grab it and run up some stairs with it with my 96kg, but I expected it to be a lot less.
It's what is and I'm not going to start messing around a brand new bike, but I am curious if it's possible to noticeably reduce the weight even in theory.
The frame itself is 2,9kg.
fork: Auron35 Boost
shock: SR TriAir
wheels: Remerx RX2027, tubes (I don't like tubeless)
RF Turbine R 35 stem+handlebar
drivetrain: 1x12 mixture of Shimano SLX and XT
brakes: four piston SLX, 180mm rotors
seatpost: Pro Koryak (what on Earth is that? can't find any info about this...)
RF Chester pedals

That's pretty much it components-wise.
Obviously the fork is fairly heavy (2,1kg or something) and the wheels too, but I wanted to make no compromises with major components, the bike being built more around going down than up :D

The only thing I can think of that could save weight are some lightweight super hi-tech wheels, but that sort of stuff also cost a kidney and a half I guess.
Going carbon handlebar+stem would likely save me maybe 150g at a significant price tag, so that's pointless even in theory.
Aside from these, I have absolutely no idea if there's any possibility to shed some 1kg off the thing.

Let the theorycrafting begin!
Anyone has any ideas?

P.S. Admire the pure sexiness of matte yellow frame that will turn permanently brown after the first ride.
View attachment 1908262
You gotta pay to play. Sure you can drop a kg, but itll cost you. The easiest and cheapest to start is tubeless and lighter tires, but you’re unwilling to do it, so youre stuck. Wheels, cranks, casette, bars, seatpost might get you there, but were talking easily iver $1000.
 

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Oh, So Interesting!
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It's fine...

Replace that front Nobby Nic for a Hans Dampf or Magic Mary in soft compound though, save it for the back. IMO speedgrip gives up too much grip for speed even for a rear tire and on the front it's almost dangerous.
 

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Dirty Old Man
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An all aluminum trail bike at just under 34 lbs isn't bad. My bike is carbon frame/wheels/bars with ti cranks and weighs the same. ;)
 

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That's about what an aluminum trail bike with that component range weighs ime. As mentioned losing significant weight will require many component changes and lots of $$$. Ride it & enjoy I say.
 

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Fart smeller
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Yep. My fs weighs 34lbs on a good day.
 

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since 4/10/2009
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Yeah, that's what you get with this sort of bike. You want a weight weenie bike, then it probably won't be a trail bike, and if it is, you're going to pay handsomely for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have Ralph and Ron for summer season or easy terrain riding, the Nobbies are for shitty weather and maybe more difficult trails (but I don't ever ride any extremes so they will work well enough I bet).
I rode rented Trek's Top Fuel 8 this summer and it was super light and awesome, but after checking the specs, I know where the 2kg+went. Shitty fork and shock, and the rims are most probably junk too.

Haven't gotten to riding it yet, it's all muddy as **** in the lowlands here, so I'll wait until after new year, hoping for some frostier temps.

I might swap the XT bottom bracket for XTR one since it supposedly has better bearings and lower friction, but otherwise screw it. I have a hardtail for distance hunting. That one I will lighten a little bit more, but it's already like 12,7kg anyway.
 

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Yep, That's what you get for a mid to low spec alloy build.
My 165/180mm carbon build with push coil rear is a solid kg lighter.....
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The frame is made out of AL 7020 T6, no idea how good that is, but I guess it's decent considering they've been handmaking the frames for 30 years :) But yea, carbon will always be lighter.
 

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I think you're right where it should be. I have a Devinci Troy and Django and both are under 30 lbs but they have carbon wheels, bars and pretty light tires. Plus they are carbon frames but likely not lighter than your frame. SLX stuff is chunkier than XT and XT is heavier than Sram GX. To get down a couple more pounds is going to be expensive and likely not worth it depending what your goals are. Also, keep in mind when you see weights published online they almost never include pedals. So, take about 400 grams off if comparing.
 

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I've found that weight is a little here and a little there. It all adds up. This bike weighs 28.2 lbs. as pictured. 2106 Scott Genius. Dropper broke, so solid seatpost for now, but that'll add 300g. So right at 29 lbs with tools and spare tube. It started life over 30 lbs. The wheels are carbon from LB and are 1700g... they were $700 w/DT350 hubs. The tires are XR4 Team 700x2.4... that combo would probably drop you over a pound for about $800 in a place you'd probabaly feel it the most. BTW, you're really missing out if you don't go tubeless. The cassette is another 1/2 pound. It all comes down to what you want and what you're willing to pay.... I raced this same bike in XC for a bit with Specialized Control SL wheels, carbon post and bars and skinny XC tires and it weighed 25.5 lbs. Did it climb better? Absolutely. But it's way more fun to ride the way it is and I just chalk the extra weight on the way up to better fitness. Have a serious chat with yourself about what's important to you, set some goals and go after it...

1908356
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I just don't like the idea of tubeless. For one, I heard it's not lighter at all (no idea if that is true or not), but most importantly, I hate the entire concept. Just the fact you can't let the bike sit for a while, otherwise you need to change the milk, which looks like a horrible mess of a job. I also heard the stuff leaks through the tires no matter what you do.
 

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I just don't like the idea of tubeless. For one, I heard it's not lighter at all (no idea if that is true or not), but most importantly, I hate the entire concept. Just the fact you can't let the bike sit for a while, otherwise you need to change the milk, which looks like a horrible mess of a job. I also heard the stuff leaks through the tires no matter what you do.
The only time I've had any issues with sealant coming through the tire was on a very old S-Works Fast Trak that was NOT designed tubeless. It did stop eventually. :ROFLMAO: Never had an issue since, all my tires now are designed TL.

Yes, you do need to refresh the latex from time to time, but I just chalk that up to bike maintenance. You're right, it really doesn't save that much weight and trail flats are a bit tidier with tubes... but then, you get less flats with tubeless.

I run 18f/21r in the tires on the bike above. Super supple and sticks like velcro. Not possible with tubes.

Again, personal preference. I fought it for years. I would never go back. I switched my gravel bike over this year and it feels like a different bike.
 

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I just don't like the idea of tubeless. For one, I heard it's not lighter at all (no idea if that is true or not), but most importantly, I hate the entire concept. Just the fact you can't let the bike sit for a while, otherwise you need to change the milk, which looks like a horrible mess of a job. I also heard the stuff leaks through the tires no matter what you do.


All else equal you usually save around 100 grams or so per wheel with tubeless compared to tubes. Personally I find changing (adding) the "milk" to be a simple job.

I agree though that if you periodically let your bike sit idle for awhile tubeless isn't ideal but for regular riders it's really good. For me tubes would be a step backwards for sure.
 

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The frame is made out of AL 7020 T6, no idea how good that is, but I guess it's decent considering they've been handmaking the frames for 30 years :) But yea, carbon will always be lighter.
Carbon won't always be lighter. Especially if that carbon is built burly. And that's the big thing about what you have. Your stuff is built fairly burly, with an eye on budget. That means it's going to be heavier. Doesn't matter the material, if you want it burly and light, you'll have to spend more for that. You can also sacrifice burliness to keep cost down. But that's going to limit how hard you can push your parts.

I just don't like the idea of tubeless. For one, I heard it's not lighter at all (no idea if that is true or not), but most importantly, I hate the entire concept. Just the fact you can't let the bike sit for a while, otherwise you need to change the milk, which looks like a horrible mess of a job. I also heard the stuff leaks through the tires no matter what you do.
Tubeless is a game changer. True, if the bike sits for a long time, you might have to address the sealant. But if doing so is a horrible mess, then you didn't need to do it in the first place (sealant wasn't dried out). Removing lumps of dried sealant that throw the tire out of balance isn't messy at all. Peeling it ALL off of the tire casing actually isn't necessary. Use the syringe method of adding sealant and it's quite a tidy process.

I've NEVER had enough sealant seep out of my tires to be a problem. When I used regular tires, yeah, I got a minute amount of seepage, but again, it never caused a problem. Using a good quality tubeless ready tire has never been a problem seepage wise for me.

What tubeless with sealant HAS done for me is great. I've pulled sticks the size of my little finger out of my tire, and everything sealed right back up. I topped off with a bit of air and kept riding no problem. I've ripped knobs off, plugged the tire in less than a minute, and continued riding. I've ridden over cactus spines, such that my tires looked like a porcupine, and didn't GAF. Tubeless isn't a miracle for every failure. Sealant on its own isn't going to fix a ripped sidewall. But with a sewing awl and thread and some extra sealant, you might be able to get rolling again. But for little crap that keeps you spending a small fortune on tubes, tubeless with sealant does a great job.

It also enables greater flexibility with tire pressures with less concern over pinch flats, and it enables the use of tire inserts for more pressure flexibility and rim protection.

Really, the only time I don't use tubeless, and I stick with tubes, is for my secondary bikes that don't get ridden very often. I'm primarily thinking of my gravel bike here. My gravel bike primarily gets used during the wintertime, and maybe once every couple months in the warmer months. At that kind of use, maintaining tubeless becomes extra work I don't care for, when with tubes, yes, I can just inflate and go ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
When you need to change a tire, doesn't all the gross sealant spill all over the rim, and you spend the next hour cleaning it off?
 
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