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Young, Shawn Young
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Went for a great ride Wednesday night. I guess they are all great but I felt great. Brought the camera along but sometimes you just feel like riding. I did manage to practice a few panning shots which didnt come out all that great.

<img src="https://bigfoot.smugmug.com/Other/d90/panning2/920361309_cSREz-XL.jpg" width="1024" height="458" border="5">

<img src="https://bigfoot.smugmug.com/Other/d90/panning/920360517_gtHmn-XL.jpg" width="1024" height="550" border="5">

Actually that second one wasnt too bad.

Oh, and the Horny toad. Pretty cool looking guy. Snapped a pic before he went scurrying off but realized I didnt know anything about them. Would he puff up to dog size and gore me with his horns?? Scary stuff but on further review I guess not.

<img src="https://bigfoot.smugmug.com/Other/d90/horny-toad/920359679_MapDr-XL.jpg" width="1024" height="544" border="5">

A bit of info on this little guy:

Description

This species of lizard has a distinctive flat-body with one row of fringed scales down the sides. They have one row of slightly enlarged scales on each side of the throat. Colors can vary and generally blend in with the color of the surrounding soil, but they usually have a beige, tan, or reddish dorsum with contrasting, wavy blotches of darker color. They have two dark blotches on the neck that are very prominent and are bordered posteriorly by a light white or gray color. They also have pointed scales on the dorsum (back) of the body. Juveniles are similar to adults, but have shorter and less-pronounced cranial spines. Desert Horned Lizards have horns that are longer than they are wide at the base, which isn't true for their congener, the Short-horned Lizard.
[edit] Diet

Desert horned lizards prey primarily on ants, but are also known to prey on other slow-moving insects such as beetles, as well as spiders and some plant material. They can often be found in the vicinity of ant hills, where they sit and wait for ants to pass by. When they find an area of soft sand, they usually shake themselves vigorously, throwing sand over their backs and leaving only their head exposed. This allows them to hide from predators and await their unsuspecting prey.
[edit] Habitat

They can usually be found in arid regions that have at least some loose soil available for burrowing, usually areas with sandy soils and limited vegetation such as sagebrush or shadscale. Still, they can also be found in areas with hardpan and gravelly soils as well. They typically range from southern Idaho in the north to northern Mexico in the south. and pin head crickets
[edit] Reproduction

These lizards mate in the spring and lay 2-16 eggs in June to July, which hatch sometime in August. Incubation lasts about 50-60 days. Individuals reach maturity in about 22 months.
[edit] Behavior

They are generally a gentle species, but have been known to try to push their crainial spines into the hand while held. If provoked, they hiss and threaten to bite. When excited, they puff themselves up with air, similar to the way a Chuckwalla does, making themselves look bigger. If spotted near a bush, they will dash into it in an attempt to find cover from any threat. If threatened, they have been known to squirt blood from their eyes as far as 5 feet. [1]

There are considered to be two subspecies: the Northern Desert horned lizard, Phrynosoma platyrhinos platyrhinos, ranging in Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, and Nevada and parts of southeastern Oregon; and the Southern Desert horned lizard, Phrynosoma platyrhinos calidiarum, ranging in southern Utah and Nevada to southeast California, western Arizona, and northern Baja California.
 

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Young, Shawn Young
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3,164 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Tough crowd.

What's the difference between a regular toad and a horny toad?

One says, ''Rib-it, rib-it,'' while the other says, ''Rub-it, rub-it.''
 

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Afric Pepperbird
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Off topic...

Man, those shorts look like they'd catch a lot on your seat! I'm almost reminded of the old "Pants on the ground" guy.
 

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Young, Shawn Young
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3,164 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
dirt farmer said:
Off topic...

Man, those shorts look like they'd catch a lot on your seat! I'm almost reminded of the old "Pants on the ground" guy.
Lol good catch I guess. 50 yards down the trail he realized He Forgot to take them off.:madman:
 

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bike change?

looks like you changed from a Yeti to a Ventana. how do you like looking for lizards from the saddle of a Ventana?
 

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Young, Shawn Young
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3,164 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
nhodge
mtbr member
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 597
bike change?
looks like you changed from a Yeti to a Ventana. how do you like looking for lizards from the saddle of a Ventana?
__________________
breezy shade
Actually, that was my buddy. I would never trade my Yeti for a Ventana!(it's a nice bike but come on:D )

lidarman Actually they DID come out great.
Thanks, that was really my first attempt at panning so I was pretty about the shots the more I looked at them.
 

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Tossin the salad.
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When I was younger living in El Paso, these were considered pets and most of the time they are very friendly. Only thing to be aware of is the blood they shoot out of their eyes. I never saw this in action by one, but I was told to be careful if they do
 

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we find those guys pretty often where we ride out here :) pretty harmless except for shooting blood out of their eyes.. and they aim for the eyes of the "predator" so watch out! lol ive never seen it happen either though

 

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I about ran over one today. They blend in so well with the dirt that they are almost invisible.... until they move. "Hey look! That little patch of dirt is running across the trail!"

Cool shots Shawn. Thanks for the Horny Toad info and panning shots. I thought they came out great too. Did Shorty lose weight? He looks thinner than I remember.
 

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Eleven - it's one louder
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Payson, AZ

Funny, my friend just sent me this picture today that he took during his ride on the Highline Trail in Payson, Arizona a couple weeks ago. Anyone know what species this is? Maybe I missed it in the thread but where were the OP's pics taken?
 

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I used to see them in Central Texas all the time. I even put them in aquariums in the house when I was a kid. I haven't seen one since 96 or 97.
 
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