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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

Just found out 2 weeks ago that I have type II diabetes. I had visited the doctor to get a referral to see another Dr. about hernia surgery and suprise, diabetes. Quite a shock I must say. Currently I'm on a couple of meds trying to get my blood sugar normalized. Anyhoo, before I got the good news I was contemplating purchasing a new pair of mtb shoes (clipless), now I'm sure I want to. Right now I've got a pair of Shimano M80's (2 velcro straps) that have really done me right over the years, however now that foot health has become very important, anyone out there have a fav shoe that they recommend? I'm riding a pretty nice HT and mainly XC, 3 season's. Also, how do you feel?


Pathfinder
 

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pathfinder said:
Hello,

Just found out 2 weeks ago that I have type II diabetes. I had visited the doctor to get a referral to see another Dr. about hernia surgery and suprise, diabetes. Quite a shock I must say. Currently I'm on a couple of meds trying to get my blood sugar normalized. Anyhoo, before I got the good news I was contemplating purchasing a new pair of mtb shoes (clipless), now I'm sure I want to. Right now I've got a pair of Shimano M80's (2 velcro straps) that have really done me right over the years, however now that foot health has become very important, anyone out there have a fav shoe that they recommend? I'm riding a pretty nice HT and mainly XC, 3 season's. Also, how do you feel?

Pathfinder
As a podiatrist, I get shoe questions a lot. First off, the key to picking shoes is finding ones that fit your feet rather than looking for a certain brand. If the shape of the shoe matches your foot, that's the first thing to look for. Next, make sure there aren't any sharp edges or seams inside the shoes that will cause pressure spots or abrasions. Make sure there's about a centimeter of room beyond your longest toe and the inside of the toe box; the tip of your toes should not be able to touch the front of the shoe. Try on shoes late in the day when your feet are at their most swollen. Sidis are nice and smooth on the inside, and Specializeds have an ample toebox. Remember though, they must fit your foot shape first and foremost.

You should also be tested with a monofilament for intact sensation on your feet. If your doctor hasn't already done that, then you may want to establish care with a podiatrist. Since you have only recently been diagnosed, then chances are your sensation is still good, but you definitely want to keep it that way. Controlling your blood sugar is crucial. I've had to amputate far too many toes on folks who let their blood sugar climb above normal.

Your doc may recommend diabetic-type orthotics at some point, which are different than the usual sports-type orthotics. You might consider getting them sooner rather than later to help prevent high pressure areas, although many insurance companies won't pay for them until you've already lost sensation (so much for preventative medicine).

You'll probably get an earful in the future about diabetes and health problems, but I've met many people with diabetes who live relatively normal lives. The key was that they controlled their blood sugar with discipline. They also exercise a lot.
 

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One of my long-time bike buddies has had type-1 diabetes since age 5. She wears a pump hiking, biking, snowshoeing and XC skiing. The only hint of her diabetes is that we stop periodically so she can check her sugar. She's had lots of practice keeping her suger level under control and has never had a problem any time I've traveled with her. I don't know if she takes special care of her feet with respect to cycling shoes, though she does have a pair of custom-made Limmer hiking boots.

Sorry I don't have any more specific info on what to do about your feet, just a story to share to let you know what's possible.

Good luck!
Kathy
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nat...Thanks for taking the time to write, I really appreciate it. My blood sugar is all over the place right now, but overall readings are going down thankfully, I really like my toes. Thanks for the shoe info about the Specialized shoes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Lucky...Thanks for the thought, I definitely like hearing positive stories. It's still kind of a shock sometimes in a where do I go from here sense, but getting to look forward biking, hiking etc. without problems is a major plus. Thanks for taking the time!
 

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My mother and grandmother are/were diabetics. MY grandmother never let her diabetes interfere with her life. My mom had a hard time getting her blood sugar under control but finally did so.She is still not as active as I wish she was, but she has no peripheral neuropathy or glaucoma. So I watch myself for signs of this disease.

Low blood sugar is much more dangerous in the short term than is high blood sugar. So always keep so glucose source with you at all times. I recommend one of the energy gels since it will not cause a rebound spike that candy will and are absorbed fairly rapidly. Being a cyclist you will get plenty of exercise so that is a big plus. There is a lot of information on diabetes on the net, inform yourself very well. Make sure to have at least one eye exam a year, possibly two a year until you get your diabetes under control.

Follow Nat's advice and go to a Podiatrist for foot care. My next door neighbor has nerve damage in his feet from his diabetes and cannot stand for long without pain.

One thing most people don't know is that diabetes does not directly kill. Rather it causes cardiovascular disease that is the responsible for the deaths of many diabetics. But your exercise will greatly reduce the possibility of this. Watch yourself for urinary tract infections.

Eat right and exercise and you should be fine.
 

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Hey Pathfinder, don't let it slow you down. My wife, daughter and 1 good ridin' bud all are type 1. My wife is super healthy, runs 1/2 marathons, hikes, etc and is generally very active. She is also good about monitoring her blood glucose.

My riding buddy still says that going to insulin shots was the best thing that ever happened to him. He feels better, is in better spirits, and still rides top notch. It's been 5-7 years since he was diagnosed now.

My daughter (2) was just diagnosed last week. It's a bit to overcome but with careful monitoring of her glucose, she'll be fine. 2 year olds and shots, though - not a good combination.

Nat has good advice on shoes - buy comfy and not cramped and you should be fine. Just like helmets, buy what fits the best, not by brand. Keep your head up - you'll get adjusted to your new ways before you know it. Just keep you blood glucose in line and you'll be fine.
 

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Any ideas about the causes, from the docs?

pathfinder said:
Hello,

Just found out 2 weeks ago that I have type II diabetes. I had visited the doctor to get a referral to see another Dr. about hernia surgery and suprise, diabetes. Quite a shock I must say. Currently I'm on a couple of meds trying to get my blood sugar normalized. Anyhoo, before I got the good news I was contemplating purchasing a new pair of mtb shoes (clipless), now I'm sure I want to. Right now I've got a pair of Shimano M80's (2 velcro straps) that have really done me right over the years, however now that foot health has become very important, anyone out there have a fav shoe that they recommend? I'm riding a pretty nice HT and mainly XC, 3 season's. Also, how do you feel?
Pathfinder
Just curious, but did the doctors give you any indication of why the Type 2 diabetes came on now?
Genetics usually plays a major role but it seems from what I've read, that excess weight in particular along with diet also are a factor.
Since you mtn bike I wouldn't think you were carrying much extra weight.
 

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My wife has been a T1 for about 22 years now. She uses Specialized shoes and is pretty particular about her feet. I have pretty wide feet and find the Specialized shoes very roomy. Nike was WAY too narrow for me and Lake was a little narrow. Diadoras were good also. I always roam around barefoot and have to catch myself about her, since she ALWAYS has something on her feet. She rubs her feet each night with lotions and stuff and each year her feet are fine.

She's a little brittle (brittle: uncontrolable blood sugars), but she just went on the pump and that seems to be smoothing things out a bunch. She rides and has just started lifting weights with me. The thing we/I watch her for when riding is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. One of the first things that goes is balance... not good on the trail or the road! With careful monitoring and nutrition, it goes just fine. Her longest ride is about ~21 miles on the trails. I stopped us every half hour to check her blood sugar and we decided she should eat 1/2 a power bar each stop. Worked great and she finished the ride feeling sick. :D I smile because it was the first time she had ever exercised to physical exhaustion vs having to stop because of the disease.

Make sure you tell whoever you're riding with about your diabetes and warn them what to look for in case you go low. I guess - from what my wife tells me - you can tell at first from the adreneline rush, but after a while, that goes away and you just get drunklike. Always carry a juice box with you, either in your bottle rack or jersey pocket (easily reachable) or have your riding buddies carry it. And if you have someone you trust, when they suggest you check your BG, do it, even if you don't think you should. You can't test too much (though, unfortunately, your fingers might disagree with that assessment!).

Overall, it's something that you have to make accomodations for, but it doesn't have to rule your life. I think I'd try and discourage the wife from getting SCUBA certified (hard to drink a juice underwater if you go low!), and the FAA won't let her get a pilot's license (that's OK, I'll do the flying anyway!), but other than that, there's not much she can't do.
 

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Hi Pathfinder
I have been a type 1 diabetic for 33yrs. I have had minimal problems, I believe being active is a big part of having good health.

As far as feet go, find a comfortable shoe. I use a Northwave shoe with the dial buckle and 2 velcro straps, very comfortable. Doctors always tell us to watch our feet, I think the best thing you can do for your feet is to maintain a good cardio/vascular system. Don't let it stop you from doing anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
My Dr. believes it is related to a bout of pancreatitis I had about two and a half years ago. People who have recovered from pancreatitis are at risk for developing diabetes. At the time of the pancreatitis I wasn't riding much, was drinking a lot and was somewhat overweight, but not obese. I was having my blood tested frequently for about a year after that with no problems, then the Dr. I was seeing for whatever reason was not covered by my insurance anymore and I didn't see anyone until just recently, my bad. In any case, we're trying to determine meds and how much, if any, of my "honeymoon" remains.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks everyone...

Thanks for all the replies, especially the encouragement to stay active. Thankfully over the last couple of years I've developed some good habits in that regard. However maybe I should purchase that 2004 Giant NRS2 that's on sale at LBS just in case:D .
 
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