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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I was curious how many of you use Gripshifts.

After I destroyed my stock LX trigger shifters back in '94 I decided I would go the Gripshift route and haven't looked back since. I just bought my third bike since I first started careening down our local NH hills in '93, an '08 Fuel EX 8, and had the LBS change the shifters (X.9) before I ever climbed on it. My hands always feel so cramped between the bar-ends and the trigger shifters - plenty of space with the Gripshifts. Yeah a little noisier on the shifting but it sure is simple to work on if it breaks.

Thoughts???
 

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I've used Gripshifters since my first mtb in '94 or 5. Never felt a need to try anything else, though my new bike came with SRAM paddle shifters so I used them for a while. They made my thumb sore/tired (I have a partial tear in a tendon in there from breaking/dislocating the thumb a few years back) and I missed being able to shift a buncha gears with one motion. So back to gripshift for me!

I do wish someone made longer levers for hydro disc brakes for us twisty fans, tho! And they do take up a little more real estate on the bars. (I just cut my grips down a bit)
 

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Broke both my thumbs and tore ligaments in one as well many years ago. Can't use thumb to shift and have always used grip shifts.

Grip shifts are just simple and never fail. Nothing ot break on the trail, and very compact too. If you have thumb problems like myself, you have to be thankful for these beauties. Some of us can't use triggers or rapid fire shimaNO stuff, so we are glad there are options.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yeah, same here with the thumb problem. I ran mine through a table saw and have limited range of motion and no feeling on the pad of the thumb, making trigger shifters pretty much worthless. I thought I was the only one!
 

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bshonbeck said:
Yeah, same here with the thumb problem. I ran mine through a table saw and have limited range of motion and no feeling on the pad of the thumb, making trigger shifters pretty much worthless. I thought I was the only one!
am i the only onw who winced reading that? ouch

im still devoted to my triggers i find when out of the saddle and i really push i end up twisting unintentionally
 
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Triggers. But I will say this: move them up or down just a few degrees from my sweet spot and my thumbs will start to hurt again. Now, dual controls? Uggggh.
 

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Gripshift ESP for me.

I am using the same 2 sets of 9.0 and 9.0sl shifters from '98 or 99. Pre-SRS technology. They work great with the modern x9 and x0 derailluers and are working smashingly with Force/Rival front der's on my 2x9 set ups.

G
 

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I've got both

I've got Shimano triggers on one bike, Sram GS on the other. They both work fine, it's just a matter of preference. I prefer GS, but it's not that big a deal, and if a bike came with one or the other, I'd ride it and have fun.

GS advantages:
1. You can trim the front derailleur.
2. Simple, reliable design. There's not much that can go wrong with these things, but I've seen plenty of inoperable triggers.

GS disadvantages:
1. Noisy detents- CLICK! CLACK!
2. The rubber on the short rotating grip wears smooth pretty fast.
3. Mushy, indecisive wrist action will result in mushy, indecisive shifting.

Regarding the front derailleur, the trim thing can work either way. If you have a perfectly set-up and functioning FD/chainline/drivetrain, then you won't need to trim, and the extra indexes of the GS will just get in your way. But if your FD/drivetrain interaction gives you some rub or occasional sluggish/reluctant shifting, you can use the extra detents GS to manage it. There are 3 positions for each chainring. I typically "overshift" a click or two to help the chain make a quick transition from one ring to the other, and then back off a click or two, eliminating any rub. Works great every time.
 

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I use Gripshift because its all Ive ever used...just like Macs....

I bought a RALEIGH TOMAC MTI 1000 in '94 and it came with XT 8 spd ( I think that it was the first year for that setup) ...

anyway...

it had Gripshift on it and thats what I thought a Mountain Bike was supposed to have..just used and abused it and the same gripshifts are still going strong...although the RALEIGH is now a superlight mostly road bike now..

fast forward to 2008 .....

I bought a TREK Top Fuel 69er and had my LBS spec it with SRAM XO gripshift to compliment the XO rear derailleur that came stock on the bike..

Man...wow....shifting is so quick and I can dump multiple gears in either direction with no problem whatsoever....while my friend who has the SHIMANO rapidfire XT system cannot seem to get to the gear he needs when the big climb comes up...I lost count how many chains he has broken...he is 230lbs or so FYI

The XO rear derailleur is so nice and much easier to work on than any SHIMANO XT stuff Ive had (760)

now if I can figure out a way to stop going too fast on my 69er and stop wrecking out and bending hangers...that would be baller!!:thumbsup:
 

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I'm running the SRAM Attacks with a Shimano 2:1 rear derailleur, and so far it's been great. I rode with gripshift ESP for 10 years, and when I got my new Remedy, I gave it a go with triggers but just wasn't digging it--so had to swap back to twist shifters. I love the extra room on the bars.

-Mike
 
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