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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm on Spring Brook this beautiful June day, chatting with bikers and hikers alike. All is good. I go left at the split of Spring Brook and eventually come up behind a lone hiker. 20 feet away I say "beautiful day". No response. 10 feet away I say "great day, yeah?" No response, she's just hiking with her head down. At this point I'm willing to allow that she's maybe deaf so I get right up behind her and say "are you going to let me by?" She mutters, head down, walking slowly (there's absolutely no way to ride around her at this particular spot) in the middle of the trail "when you dismount". WTF?

No acknowledgment of my presence, just militant hiker attitude. I get off my bike, go off trail to get around her and say "the rangers I've talked to here say dismounting isn't a requirement". She says "the rangers are wrong. It says so on the sign (pointing back to the trailhead). It's the law." At this point I'm wondering if there was indeed a new requirement posted that says "you must dismount when yielding." I ride away saying "the rangers are right, you're the one that needs straightening out". She barks out a derisive laugh.

So I go up to the next set of signs and see no word "dismount" so I double back to inform her of this (why am I wasting my time, you ask?) She just kept repeating "it's the law, it's the law". I gave up and said, just ask the next ranger you see. She says "this is my interpretation, you have your interpretation and the ranger may have theirs. It's the law." I'm outta there.

So I read the www.osmp.org "rules" and it says "Yielding the right of way requires slowing down to a safe speed, being prepared to stop, establishing communication, and passing safely". All of which I did and informed her that "that's the law" but the militant hiker was having none of that. Where did she get the idea we HAVE to dismount?

 

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nice marmot.
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people like that are frustrating.
 

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Ricky DH
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I almost went to blows with a "militant" type one time. This guy just wanted to beat the crap out of the first bike that needed to pass him. It was a VERY UGLY situation. Some people are just arse holes man.
 

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Your retarded
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You see, in the yield sign you posted above, it is clear that the cyclist is actually dismounted from the bike and is jogging beside it while pushing. However, since the image is represented by a silhouette, it can be confused that the person is pedaling when in reality, they are next to the bike in mid stride. The sign also clearly states that this technique is "the law." You must jog next to your bike with a stride on the same plans as the cranks. This hiker was simply informing you about a rule you easily overlooked. :p

Sucks that you ran into someone as stubborn and ignorant as she sounds to be. I hope the rest of your ride was better.
 

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This seems to be a common topic among many threads. For that reason alone, I advise to dismount, walk around, say "good day" and roll along. It's not what's right or wrong, but the way in which we are perceived that matters most these days. When in doubt, take the high road.
 

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Living the High Life
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Excellent point Nickle. Its too bad XCguy didn't realize this, he could have apologized to said lady hiker.

When people act like I like to respond in the most sarcastic way, but with no sarcasm in my voice and see if they pick up on it. When they don't it just confirms that yes, they are morons and you should just move on.
 

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bacon! bacon! bacon!
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zorro said:
This seems to be a common topic among many threads. For that reason alone, I advise to dismount, walk around, say "good day" and roll along.
I respectfully disagree. As a hiker and a biker when I'm on my bike I don't have to grovel in the face of a dip$hit hiker. They can kiss my a$$ as far as I'm concerned.

Luckily there probably aren't too many dip$hit hikers like that...

outside of Boulder.

:p
 

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MFin' Princess
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zorro said:
This seems to be a common topic among many threads. For that reason alone, I advise to dismount, walk around, say "good day" and roll along. It's not what's right or wrong, but the way in which we are perceived that matters most these days.
That's completely unreasonable as well as impractical; particularly in parks that support a very high population of visitors, like those JCOS.

Respectfully, that's not the answer at all. The answer is to ensure that policies and regulations encourage all visitors to mutually cooperate, allow free and safe movement on trails, and expect and respect each other.
 

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Nickle said:
You see, in the yield sign you posted above, it is clear that the cyclist is actually dismounted from the bike and is jogging beside it while pushing. However, since the image is represented by a silhouette, it can be confused that the person is pedaling when in reality, they are next to the bike in mid stride. The sign also clearly states that this technique is "the law." You must jog next to your bike with a stride on the same plans as the cranks. This hiker was simply informing you about a rule you easily overlooked. :p
Now,
That
was
funny.
 

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Your retarded
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zorro said:
This seems to be a common topic among many threads. For that reason alone, I advise to dismount, walk around, say "good day" and roll along. It's not what's right or wrong, but the way in which we are perceived that matters most these days. When in doubt, take the high road.
I disagree with you there. If this lady is encountered again, maybe, but I see no reason to dismount and walk around every other trail user when it's not required. All that would do is make it the expected action from mountain bikers and conflicts would arise when bikers don't dismount to pass, even though such an action is not required. From the sound of this story and xcguy's previous posts, he has a pretty good grasp on trail etiquette and I think his actions were fine. There are going to be people in the world who will not be pleased even if an infinite amount of effort is exerted. A line needs to be drawn so that too much effort isn't exerted on futile encounters.
 

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Rolling
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Sorry you had to deal with that, xcguy. Just like a car stop at a yield sign to yield, a cyclist doesn't have to dismount to yield.

However, with a disgruntled hiker like this that basically blocks the trail, dismounting might be the only option that allows you to yield. In a strict sense, the hiker has priority in the decision process just like a car having the right-of-way in a yielding intersection forces the yielding car to "stop." I think in the end, because she wants you to dismount, you have to oblige.

It's sad that she decided to exercise some dominance move because of her skewed interpretation. She would be correct if the only option for you to pass was to dismount, but wrong it demanding it here just because she desires it. She wasn't being reasonable.

Unfortunately, just as you had to leave the trail to get around, many cyclists probably road off trail to get around her on that same ride. I'm not sure there are very many spots on Spring Brook where the trail is that narrow though.

I think you have to let it go.

BTW, the most shocking thing about this story, xcguy, is that you didn't post a photo of her.

You should have taken a photo and said to her that you are posting this on a bike site so all the riders will know who they are suppose to dismount to.
 

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TVC15 said:
That's completely unreasonable as well as impractical; particularly in parks that support a very high population of visitors, like those JCOS.

Respectfully, that's not the answer at all. The answer is to ensure that policies and regulations encourage all visitors to mutually cooperate, allow free and safe movement on trails, and expect and respect each other.
I repeat, it's not a matter of what's right or wrong, but a matter of perception. I rarely run into these numnutz, but when I do, I'd rather smile and ride then actually turn around and confront some idiot. Most hikers are cool and do let us by, it's just those few that IMHO don't deserve any of my energy or attention.
 

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MFin' Princess
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zorro said:
I repeat, it's not a matter of what's right or wrong, but a matter of perception.
There we agree, but in this situation it is the hiker who is being unreasonable and creating conflict, and therefore her perception is the one that needs changing.

I believe sound policy and regulations can and should do that.
 

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Living the High Life
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All right, total failure here. Why hasn't anyone said "she wanted me to dismount but I wasn't finished!"

Bunch o' dorks on these forums sometimes.
 

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MFin' Princess
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Ithnu said:
All right, total failure here. Why hasn't anyone said "she wanted me to dismount but I wasn't finished!"

Bunch o' dorks on these forums sometimes.
:lol: Brilliant.

:thumbsup:

Oh man, I gotta go ride my bike.
 

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Your retarded
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Ithnu said:
All right, total failure here. Why hasn't anyone said "she wanted me to dismount but I wasn't finished!"

Bunch o' dorks on these forums sometimes.
Honestly, that was the first thing that came to mind but I felt I had already reached my quota today for crude MTBR humor and took the "high road" instead. What can I say, I was in doubt.
 
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