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Can someone recommend a bike maintenance and repair book for the newbie? After looking on Amazon, there are several to choose from. Any suggestions?

Jake
 

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The problem is books go obsolete fast and pretty much are generalized tips when specific tips will get you farther. Manufacturer sites and youtube are good sources of info. Parktools was always a good source of basic info from the beginning. And there is always <i>here</i> at mtbr, yes you have to wade through the trolls, snarky remarks, and some misinformation but eventually you will find the answer you are looking for. What i am saying is gather info from different sources and go from there.
 

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And there is always <i>here</i> at mtbr, yes you have to wade through the trolls, snarky remarks, and some misinformation but eventually you will find the answer you are looking for. What i am saying is gather info from different sources and go from there.
Everybody seems like an expert when you have little to no idea what you're doing. I'd stick with manufacturer's sites and other equally credible sources.
 

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I also used the Zinn book when I first started working on my own stuff. A lot of good info in there and written using common sense(at least to me)
 

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fool goin up, joker down
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Gonna add a third vote for Zinn, while it doesn't have 'actual' pictures of the parts you will be working with, nothing tunes your skills quite like experience
 

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Trail Tire TV on blogger
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When I first started working on bikes again I purchased 5 and bounced around between them. there were only 3 I continued to use after a month or so..

The Zinn book is decent.. but I found there are as good or better out there.. more do to I prefer actual photo's over poor quality illustrations.. The info is decent in it and updated pretty regular, but for a beginner,.. choose something else (or use multiple) I did keep it the longest short of the Blue Book as there is some good info on more detailed things (wheel building for instance) that it was great for.

the Parks Blue book is probably the best all around one.. (it's the only one I still have)

but for beginners I've found below's linked book to be about the best and easiest to follow,..I used this more than all of them for the first year or so, just was faster/easier to get the info and actually see what was needed to be done...
https://www.google.com/shopping/pro....3&ei=Fx4wU5a9MMeX0QG1wIC4Cg&ved=0CKwCEKkrMA4


using Parks website with any of them is a good idea as it's more up to date than any book,.. but I still prefer a hard copy when possible.
 

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Just here for the scenery
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I'd stick with manufacturer's sites and other equally credible sources.
I agree, but a problem is that manufacturers seem to be steadily cutting back on the amount of info and how-to that they are releasing. No doubt liability is one motivation for this; if the service manual consists of "be sure to take your [Product X] to a trained professional", perhaps they can escape blame when someone mis-torques their caliper bolts. No doubt, though, manufacturers have also noticed they can cut costs a bit by not releasing consumer-oriented service info.

Related things are going on in the auto service world, though more obviously there because manufacturers are trying to drive service business to their franchised dealers.

I think it behooves everyone who likes to work on their own bikes to be aware of these tendencies by the manufacturers, and to do their best to push back by asking for/demanding adequate service info when only pablum seems to be offered. Perhaps a bit of public attention for the worst offenders, in MTBR threads and reviews, would help too.
 

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I agree, but a problem is that manufacturers seem to be steadily cutting back on the amount of info and how-to that they are releasing. No doubt liability is one motivation for this; if the service manual consists of "be sure to take your [Product X] to a trained professional", perhaps they can escape blame when someone mis-torques their caliper bolts. No doubt, though, manufacturers have also noticed they can cut costs a bit by not releasing consumer-oriented service info.

Related things are going on in the auto service world, though more obviously there because manufacturers are trying to drive service business to their franchised dealers.

I think it behooves everyone who likes to work on their own bikes to be aware of these tendencies by the manufacturers, and to do their best to push back by asking for/demanding adequate service info when only pablum seems to be offered. Perhaps a bit of public attention for the worst offenders, in MTBR threads and reviews, would help too.

Shimano is putting a ton of money into tech info, but it's all aimed at professional mechanics. Their reason isn't about liability either, it's about making their product work properly. Shimano and most other bike manufacturers have started making products technical enough that they're not serviceable by the average home 'mechanic'. Nobody is really willing to come out and say it though. The evolution of bike products has given us some pretty awesome gear across the board and it needs a level of care that's far beyond what bicycles required even a decade ago. It's not unlike the computer revolution that happened in automobiles that lead to the death of the shade tree mechanic.
 

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Rocks belong
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I agree, but a problem is that manufacturers seem to be steadily cutting back on the amount of info and how-to that they are releasing. No doubt liability is one motivation for this; if the service manual consists of "be sure to take your [Product X] to a trained professional", perhaps they can escape blame when someone mis-torques their caliper bolts.
My problem is when I go to an LBS or 'trained professional' and the only responses I get are "duuuuude, I don't know if we've done that"

Maybe my expectations are too high, or I have a high willingness to learn and figure out for myself. But I've had a couple recent instances where I've proven to be the expert... and had to go as far as showing the dealer the research I had performed and guiding them through the repair. This has happened to me this year at both a bike shop or two AND a Nissan dealer trying to fix my Pathfinder. (For the Pathfinder, I actually printed off pages and handed it to them and said; "I have symptoms X, please replace part Y" and it fixed it.)
 

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Birdman aka JMJ
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I use the Zinn book , and I have the "bible", the Barnett's manual. I use Zinn as a quick reference when relacing wheels, even though I have 3 wheel building books. It's a decent guide to get you going on the basics. I have also use the park website in a pinch.

Another thing I do is print out any user or technical guides I find for forks/shocks/ etc. and keep them in a binder.

JMJ
 
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