Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This was my 2nd ever trail with my new mtb. It was listed as a fairly decent trail where I was riding over gravel and some random small rocks and stuff. Since I've only had the bike 3 days (it's a Giant Boulder SE) should I expect my LBS to just replace it in good faith? Is it covered under warranty? Just wondering what to expect when I take it to get fixed tomorrow.

... otherwise, I might just have to bust out the welding kit and fix it myself! Hahahaha!
 

·
Ride what you want!!
Joined
·
2,202 Posts
LegoGT said:
This was my 2nd ever trail with my new mtb. It was listed as a fairly decent trail where I was riding over gravel and some random small rocks and stuff. Since I've only had the bike 3 days (it's a Giant Boulder SE) should I expect my LBS to just replace it in good faith? Is it covered under warranty? Just wondering what to expect when I take it to get fixed tomorrow.

... otherwise, I might just have to bust out the welding kit and fix it myself! Hahahaha!
You broke it... sucks... but you broke it. Buy a new one, and maybe upgrade.

george
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
Upgrade? I say downgrade.

george_da_trog said:
You broke it... sucks... but you broke it. Buy a new one, and maybe upgrade.

george
As you've discovered, the rear derailleur is one of the most vulnerable parts on a bicycle. It's not especially burly, and it hangs low where it can hit rocks. A branch in the rear spokes can easily take it out. So I say, buy the cheapest one that will handle the number and size of your rear cogs. Even the cheapest ones shift fine. Expensive ones might wear better, but they're just as vulnerable as cheap ones to damage from trail debris.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
How did you snap it? JRA? Suck up a stick in the spokes? Fall on a rock? If it's any of those, you know YOU should foot the bill. If it's not, have them look at it, you might luck out. But don't try to get **** for free, just means I pay more next time I buy a derailleur...

edited for tocorunner grammar
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
mudferret said:
How did you snap it? JRA? Suck up a stick in the spokes? Fall on a rock? If it's any of those, you know YOU should foot the bill. If it's not, have them look at it, you might luck out. But don't try to get **** for free, just means I pay more next time I buy a derailleur...

edited for tocorunner grammar
Well, as far as JRA (had to look up the acronym), since I was bouncing along the trail on and between rocks you would think it would have snapped there. It didn't "fall into the spokes" and lock up my rear wheel until about 50ft or so further on a fairly smooth uphill.

Yeah, I would never demand something for free, but I just didn't know if it should have lasted longer than 3days or not. If it's something that breaks commonly like it sounds then I'm sure I'll just drop the money and get it fixed... at least I should get the labor for free, I think -- my LBS gave me 4months worth of free "tune-ups" with my bike.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,131 Posts
ive snapped dozens of derailers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
Do you know for sure you broke the dera. and not the hanger? The hanger can be easily and cheaply replaced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
524 Posts
bulC said:
As you've discovered, the rear derailleur is one of the most vulnerable parts on a bicycle. It's not especially burly, and it hangs low where it can hit rocks. A branch in the rear spokes can easily take it out. So I say, buy the cheapest one that will handle the number and size of your rear cogs. Even the cheapest ones shift fine. Expensive ones might wear better, but they're just as vulnerable as cheap ones to damage from trail debris.

This is good advice although I would get at least deore which is prety cheap and works reasonably well :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
kjfp said:
Do you know for sure you broke the dera. and not the hanger? The hanger can be easily and cheaply replaced.
Uhmmm... still new to this... what's the hanger? The part that broke is where the metal bar mount for the derailleur connects to the wheel axel. I guess it's where the quick release nut squeezes down on the piece of metal that it snapped. The rest of the mechanism is still in good condition (minus all the sand and stuff that's in my chain now).

That's why I half jokingly metioned that I could just weld it back together... because I really will if it's going to cost me more than like $25-$30.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
I may have the official terminology wrong but I refer to it as the hanger. I broke mine. They are engineered to fail before you severely damage the actual unit. There are threads about this on this web site. Was your dera. bent and then you attempted to straighten it out and it broke? Your looking at between $15 and $35 I would guess if the warranty does not cover it.
 

·
Rollin' a fatty
Joined
·
5,863 Posts
The hanger or dropout is what probably broke. It's intended to do that in order to save the rear mech and frame.

Why don't you upgrade to singlespeed like indigosky suggested? Once you tried you'll never go back to gears again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
kjfp said:
I may have the official terminology wrong but I refer to it as the hanger. I broke mine. They are engineered to fail before you severely damage the actual unit. There are threads about this on this web site. Was your dera. bent and then you attempted to straighten it out and it broke? Your looking at between $15 and $35 I would guess if the warranty does not cover it.
Well, I started searching online for those parts and it looks like I snapped the rear hanger. It still was no fun but to break but it's definately cheaper to replace. I saw prices from around $10-$20 for those things as opposed to like $50-$100 for the whole derailleur. I guess I can be glad that broke and not the whole unit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
DiRt DeViL said:
Why don't you upgrade to singlespeed like indigosky suggested? Once you tried you'll never go back to gears again.
Single speed? Like my old BMX style Schwinn and GT? It's still nice having at least 2 or 3 gears when either going uphill or down, but maybe I'm missing their advantages other than durability and easy maintanace for off-roading. Is this something where I should just read the single-speed forums for a while? ...or is it like going to the dark side?
 

·
Rollin' a fatty
Joined
·
5,863 Posts
Singlespeeding is like entering the dark side of mountain biking, once you try it you get hooked and will never go back. Just kiding, I love it but still keep my trusty geared FS rig (Giant VT2) for the rough stuff.

I use the SS for training, it's different, painfull but fun. It's simplicity is what I like the most about it even though you can make a SS rig as complicated as you want it to be.
 

·
Probably drunk right now
Joined
·
6,753 Posts
Singlespeeders are sissy!

DiRt DeViL said:
Singlespeeding is like entering the dark side of mountain biking, once you try it you get hooked and will never go back. Just kiding, I love it but still keep my trusty geared FS rig (Giant VT2) for the rough stuff.

I use the SS for training, it's different, painfull but fun. It's simplicity is what I like the most about it even though you can make a SS rig as complicated as you want it to be.
Stick with your geared bike for now and have fun. There may come a time when you'll knock enough brains out to want to give SSing a go, but until then, replace the hanger and get back to riding.

A helpful riding tip for you: It may not be a bad idea to grab two hangers and carry one with you when you ride. On longer rides away from my local trails, I carry a spare hanger just so I'm not walking or singlespeeding for the rest of the ride.

Ken
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Covert to SS on the fly?

Ken in KC said:
On longer rides away from my local trails, I carry a spare hanger just so I'm not walking or singlespeeding for the rest of the ride.
There's a way to rig up your bike in the field to work as SS even with a broken hanger? I was only about a mile into the ride so I just carried my bike most of the way, but if I were further away it would be nice to be able to convert it to SS for the trip back.
 

·
Probably drunk right now
Joined
·
6,753 Posts
For a mile, I would walk...

LegoGT said:
There's a way to rig up your bike in the field to work as SS even with a broken hanger? I was only about a mile into the ride so I just carried my bike most of the way, but if I were further away it would be nice to be able to convert it to SS for the trip back.
It depends on the geometry of your bike's rear triangle and the gear ratios that you're running. Some bike/cassette/middle or small chain ring combinations allow a rider to SS a bike if the rear DR is disabled. It takes some practice and isn't something I recommend any do just for fun, but it will keep you from walking ouut from time to time.

1. Remove rear DR. Be sure to wrap your cable and housing around your top tube ot take it off the bike completely.

2. Adjust your front DR so you're in the middle ring (this is usally the best ring to be in for SSing a geared bike).

3. From the top of the rings, line the chain up on the middle ring in front and the middle ring (out of 9) in back. This combination should give you a decent chain alignment.

4. Once the chain alignment is confirmed, turn the bike over on it's handlebars, put the chain in the middle/middle gear combination and pull the slack out of the chain by pulling the chain together (like making a loop when you tie your shoes).

5. Try and find a pin/link combination in the chain that will allow you to break the chain apart, pull out links and reassemble the chain.

Keep in mind that you don't want to pull to tightly on the middle/middle gear commbination or you will significantly wear down those gears.

Also, you may not be able to find a combination that tensions the chain perfectly. If the chain is too slack or doesn't line up properly, you'll be able to ride downhill or on flats, but the force you'll exert while climbing will pop the chain off and cause you to plant your chest or kness in to your stem or handlebars.

This is basically how to SS a geared bike. The risk you run is that you'll likely have to replace a chain ($20 or so) and you may have to replace your middle ring and cassette (big $$) if your chain is too tight.

It's much easier and better to carry an extra DR hanger.

Also, if I'm on a local trail, I would walk out. If I were on a longer ride, I would SS the geared bike.

Ken
 

·
ballbuster
Joined
·
12,718 Posts
My Wife's Boulder....

kjfp said:
Do you know for sure you broke the dera. and not the hanger? The hanger can be easily and cheaply replaced.
...does not have a replaceable deraileur hangar, but her's is a 2000 model.

Hangars break, but not just out of the blue. You have to do something to it. They just don't randomly break for no reason. if it broke, it must have sucked something in, causing the break without your knowledge. No biggie, just fix it and get on with your life. Not the LBS or Giant's fault. This happens to all bikes, like flat tires (stan's and USTs excluded, of course).
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top