Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
ballbuster
Joined
·
12,718 Posts

·
Doesntplaywellwithmorons!
Joined
·
10,938 Posts
pimpbot said:
.... that would harsh your buzz.

I often wonder about stuff like this when I look at how thin my RS Duke Race's alu steering tube is in combination with my 195# arse.
about 1/16th of an inch thin...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,850 Posts
Its pretty safe to use most carbon steerers with road bikes. I think the real risk is when you get to these much lighter weight race parts with much thinner side walls, particularly when most people use it as an everyday training bike. Having the lightest is not always best. I think the reason for Beloki's crash last year was his brake pad chewed into the Campagnolo carbon rim causing the tire to roll off. Moral of the story, beware of ultralite racing components, especially carbon!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
444 Posts
Hecubus said:
Its pretty safe to use most carbon steerers with road bikes. I think the real risk is when you get to these much lighter weight race parts with much thinner side walls, particularly when most people use it as an everyday training bike. Having the lightest is not always best. I think the reason for Beloki's crash last year was his brake pad chewed into the Campagnolo carbon rim causing the tire to roll off. Moral of the story, beware of ultralite racing components, especially carbon!
Was there ever official explanation for Beloki's crash? One suggested reason was carbon rim overheating and tubular _glue tape_ (not regular glue used with tubulars) loosening due too much heat?
 

·
Primative Screwhead
Joined
·
322 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My understanding...

markom said:
Was there ever official explanation for Beloki's crash? One suggested reason was carbon rim overheating and tubular _glue tape_ (not regular glue used with tubulars) loosening due too much heat?
...was that he hit a patch of melted tar and highsided. If you watch the replay, his rear wheel slips out, he corrects and then it snaps back as it regains tractions. Over he goes, landing on his elbow and hip...and then proceeds to make horrible sobbing noises whilst laying in the dirt. Ouch.

On the commentary, Liggett mentions that Vinokurov nearly lost his front wheel on exactly the same spot.

For those with eagle eyes, observe how Armstrong misses a five foot deep concrete drain by 12 inches as he enters the field.

Carbon steerers...I have one on my Bianchi Carbon XL. Can't say I'm overly worried.

F.
 

·
Old School Member
Joined
·
124 Posts
Hecubus said:
Its pretty safe to use most carbon steerers with road bikes. I think the real risk is when you get to these much lighter weight race parts with much thinner side walls, particularly when most people use it as an everyday training bike. Having the lightest is not always best. I think the reason for Beloki's crash last year was his brake pad chewed into the Campagnolo carbon rim causing the tire to roll off. Moral of the story, beware of ultralite racing components, especially carbon!
That's not right actually. Beloki rolled the tire due to the angle, but the crash was caused by the road surface heating and rider error. He would have blown a clincher too. The wheel and pad had little to do with it in any of the reports I saw. Watching it myself so many times, it appears in my opinion that rider error (Beloki was pushing it very hard trying to catch Vino) in entering the corner way too fast, trying to brake sharply and then hitting that bad section of pavement with little margin for error.

While certain light parts may be suspect, most are heavily tested as just as safe as heavier stuff- just a heck of a lot more expensive. The items with weight limits, especially rather low ones are the stuff to avoid IMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,850 Posts
It could be. I just remember having read somewhere and am *almost* certain it was in one of the big cycling publications and was discussed in road bike review forums that the brake pad was found to have torn right into the rims sidewall after it overheated beyond what capagnolo had tested the wheel to. There was definately some sort of wheel failure behind it. I even remember a campy engineer explaining on how they tested the wheels. I'll try and see if I find the thread given that it was about a year ago and in the old forum format too.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top