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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m trying to help a friend out and find the best possible bike she can get in the $600-$700 range. The biggest problem has been finding a size of 14 - 14.5 inch. Any recommendations would be great.

Thanks.
 

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I like air!
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
SuperKat7 said:
Is it for me?
Whats the matter, no one wants to help a guy that wandered into the Womens Lounge? I promiss I kept my eyes closed the whole time. :D

SuperKat - It seems like everytime I turn around your getting a new bike. Do you really need a 10th bike? Hows the v10 treating you?
 

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i worship Mr T
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milhouse said:
I'm trying to help a friend out and find the best possible bike she can get in the $600-$700 range. The biggest problem has been finding a size of 14 - 14.5 inch. Any recommendations would be great.

Thanks.
the best possible bike she can get in any price range is the one that fits her best.

i would recommend heading to your LBS(s) and having her try out as many bikes as they have in her size. all the major bike companies make bikes in that size: Trek, Gary Fisher, Giant, Fuji, Cannondale, etc.

and in that price range i would definitely look at hardtails only. any new FS bike in that range will be garbage.

rt
 

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Don't worry, be happy!
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milhouse said:
Whats the matter, no one wants to help a guy that wandered into the Womens Lounge? I promiss I kept my eyes closed the whole time. :D
Milhouse, did you read the FAQ or even look down the page? (Typical male, probably didn't ask for directions.) :D :eek: Seriously, variations of this question are asked at least once a week. A good search of this forum should bring up lots and lots and lots of recent information.

:)
 

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Freeriding Feline
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Ha HA! You know I haven't even taken that V10 out yet? Between work and being sick I've missed out on some great riding weather.
What are you looking for, a hardtail or FS?
 

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milhouse said:
I'm trying to help a friend out and find the best possible bike she can get in the $600-$700 range. The biggest problem has been finding a size of 14 - 14.5 inch. Any recommendations would be great.

Thanks.
Specialized Rockhopper Women's.

What Women's design means for most manufacturers:
1. shorter top tube
2. wider saddle (because women's sitbones are not as narrow as men's)
3. narrower handlebars (because women's shoulder width is narrower than men's)

What Specialized does in addition to this:
Lighter tubing on all hardtail women's bikes. Not because chicks are less "rad and aggressive" but because physiologically the way women apply power is distinct enough from men that the tubing can be lighter without compromising the structure. That is to say, a woman's power-to-weight ratio is less than men's and requires less material in the structure.
Lighter bike = easier to handle.

Why Rockhopper?
--realatively light-weight hardtail
--lock-out on the fork
--Specialized makes great bikes and is more committed to women's needs than most manufacturers.
--about $500
--they come in XS/13". Note: this is a tiny bike, for someone shorter than 5'1". I am 5'5", and I ride either a Med/17 or Large/18 women's bike. The top-tube LENGTH is your concern, not the stand-over height. The top-tube is dropped down already to accommodate a shorter person. Make sure she doesn't get a bike that is too "short" top-tube-wise, or she'll be on a twitchy bike.

Good luck.

PS. The Treks you mention above have got very little on the Rockhopper. Compare your components and prices. Any time you go above $370, ask yourself what you're paying for and whether you want/need it.
--lighter frame?
--better derailleur?
--disc brakes?
--8-speed or 9-speed?
--better fork? adjustable to rider-weight fork?
Take her with you and have her compress the forks on the standard women's bikes. Most companies won't have lighter springs installed - her weight won't ever really compress that fork. As I recall, the Rockhopper women's has lighter springs.

(all this being said, I do not, in fact, ride a Specialized. I'm just impressed with what I see)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
SuperKat7 said:
Ha HA! You know I haven't even taken that V10 out yet? Between work and being sick I've missed out on some great riding weather.
Well full suspension would be ideal but with that price range except maybe an Iron horse on closeout somewhere. I never really rode a HT so I'm wondering what is more important for a casual rider; A lighter bike with better parts or full suspension and heavier? I was looking at the Trek 3500, 4500, 6500 WSD's.
 

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I like air!
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
sunnyracegirl said:
Specialized Rockhopper Women's.

What Women's design means for most manufacturers:
1. shorter top tube
2. wider saddle (because women's sitbones are not as narrow as men's)
3. narrower handlebars (because women's shoulder width is narrower than men's)

What Specialized does in addition to this:
Lighter tubing on all hardtail women's bikes. Not because chicks are less "rad and aggressive" but because physiologically the way women apply power is distinct enough from men that the tubing can be lighter without compromising the structure. That is to say, a woman's power-to-weight ratio is less than men's and requires less material in the structure.
Lighter bike = easier to handle.

Why Rockhopper?
--realatively light-weight hardtail
--lock-out on the fork
--Specialized makes great bikes and is more committed to women's needs than most manufacturers.
--about $500
--they come in XS/13". Note: this is a tiny bike, for someone shorter than 5'1". I am 5'5", and I ride either a Med/17 or Large/18 women's bike. The top-tube LENGTH is your concern, not the stand-over height. The top-tube is dropped down already to accommodate a shorter person. Make sure she doesn't get a bike that is too "short" top-tube-wise, or she'll be on a twitchy bike.

Good luck.
Thank you SRG. That is exactly what I was looking for; a suggestion and some details. :thumbsup:
 

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*rt* said:
the best possible bike she can get in any price range is the one that fits her best.

i would recommend heading to your LBS(s) and having her try out as many bikes as they have in her size. all the major bike companies make bikes in that size: Trek, Gary Fisher, Giant, Fuji, Cannondale, etc.

and in that price range i would definitely look at hardtails only. any new FS bike in that range will be garbage.

rt
I'd have to second this...
 

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Fisher has a Tassajara (hard tail) that came in a 14.5 in 2006. Nice little bike which has the rear wheel set more directly under your butt so that climbing steeps is a lot easier. I ended up going full with a Cannondale Rush but am keeping the Tassajara because it handles so great.
 

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I like air!
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks everyone!!! Im going to check into these options. While we are on the subject, any one know some good shops in NYC that have big selections of bikes.
 

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milhouse said:
I'm trying to help a friend out and find the best possible bike she can get in the $600-$700 range. The biggest problem has been finding a size of 14 - 14.5 inch. Any recommendations would be great.

Thanks.
The one that fits will be the most comfortable and thus the one that gets ridden. All of the brands named in this thread would work just fine, the trick is to find the one that fits and she is most comfortable on. Brands have varying top tube lengths and geometries, which can be just as important as stand over clearance. Find an LBS that will work with frame fit and with her to make sure gets on the right bike. As far as finding the small sizes, that is a trick in some areas. I would call ahead to the LBS' and ask if they have any in stock and/or built up. Just don't take "No, but I have a 16" on the floor that might work." that will lead to a salesperson trying to dump a bike that won't fit on you. Hope that helps.
 

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Kira, what's the Rush's standover height? My friend is only 5' tall, though I don't know her inseam.[/QUOTE]

abc,
I am not too techy but the specs for the petite say 29.4in/74.6cm and the small and medium have the same standover 29.7in/75.4cm. I am about 5'4 with a longer torso and went with the medium which has the same handling feel as the small mens Tassajara. Hopefully that is what you were looking for! :)
 

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Kira, what's the Rush's standover height? My friend is only 5' tall, though I don't know her inseam.[/QUOTE]

Now that I think about it, the 29.7 inch standover doesn't really make sense.....My legs are not that long (maybe a 30 inch inseam) but I have plenty of space until I hit the top tube. I just spoke to a cycling guy I work with and he thinks they may be measuring from the high part of the angled top tube so it doesn't seem to be an accurate measurement.
 

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I like air!
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
screampint said:
The one that fits will be the most comfortable and thus the one that gets ridden. All of the brands named in this thread would work just fine, the trick is to find the one that fits and she is most comfortable on. Brands have varying top tube lengths and geometries, which can be just as important as stand over clearance. Find an LBS that will work with frame fit and with her to make sure gets on the right bike. As far as finding the small sizes, that is a trick in some areas. I would call ahead to the LBS' and ask if they have any in stock and/or built up. Just don't take "No, but I have a 16" on the floor that might work." that will lead to a salesperson trying to dump a bike that won't fit on you. Hope that helps.
Thanks, I realize the bike has to fit and all that. I was really just looking for suggestions from other girls or women that ride and what manufactures specifically cater to smaller women. From there they could at least go to the manufactures sites and look for retailers in the area and go try some specific frames.
 

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milhouse said:
Thanks, I realize the bike has to fit and all that. I was really just looking for suggestions from other girls or women that ride and what manufactures specifically cater to smaller women. From there they could at least go to the manufactures sites and look for retailers in the area and go try some specific frames.
Raleigh's $700 hardtail (Mojave 2.00397450837, whatever the number is) comes in a tiny little frame, it's not "WSD" but it has worked for a few of my friends that went on to graduate to 3 and 4 thousand dollar bikes. Other great small frame manufacturers that aren't neccessarily WSD are Kona, Jamis, Rocky Mountain, these are "mid-size" companies that don't have the budget to market WSD (although they are beginning to), but have always done a great job designing bikes in sizes that are most commonly used by women (before WSD was a marketing hit).
 

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Carver Mini

This is a bit over your price range, but wanted to mention the mini from Carver. Dont let the "Kid" references fool you. This is a very nice and durable hardtail that will fit riders ranging from 4'1" to 5'2". We have put several shorter women on these and they love them.

The cool thing is that it can run 24 or 26" wheels, disc or canti brakes, and with the EBB, it can be set up as a SS or geared bike very easily.

One of the coolest bikes we did was to set up the bike with a 24" rear wheel and 26" front. Rolled over obstacles great, but lowered the clearance and provided quicker acceleration.

http://www.carverbikes.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=7&Itemid=12
 
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