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No no...the OTHER LA.
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I have the same issue. 90 degree angles might be an exaggeration, as even the most extreme switchback is a less sweeping angle. But, it's tough and I always loose way more speed than others (it seems). What I have been working on is coming up on the turn at a medium speed and, approximately 3-6 feet before the turn starts happening I finesse the rear brake to lock up and spin the tail around. Done right, this can help you follow the curve and end up shooting right down the path. Done wrong, you over shoot and end up in a cactus or your front wheel flys out from under you. I've experienced both. :( A downside of this technique is that it tears up the curve more than gently (and SLOWLY) flowing through it. What do you trail/race etiquette folks say?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
cool

thanks, yeah last time I aproached a turn like that i tried to lean and steer into the turn at the same time, ended up messed up, the bike was messed up to the cables got yanked in the process resulting in the loss of both sram X-9 shifters, sucks 120$ repair job!!!:cryin:
 

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handlebar tricks

hei,
i'm no expert descender either but putting as much weight as you can on the hand that's outside the turn has an almost magical effect, and the bike reacts cutting a much tighter turn.
it takes some practice, but it works. you have to lean forward to be able to put enought weight on the bars, and then kind of 'favour' the hand outside. putting weight on the front wheel makes it bite better and limits washouts; putting weight outside makes the center of gravity shift to where the tyre meets the trail (which I guess is where it has to be). If you can hear the rear wheel skidding -for lack of weight- you're doing fine!

that, and praying, of course!
 

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Did you see the crash on sand patch in the TdF/

I guess you don't want to lock up the tires on a curve in the sand.

'course, the roadies have quarter inch tires, but the principle is the same
 

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Andrew

Andrew has te concept, you want your weight on the other outside of the corner. I find some people take the corner like they would on a motorcycle and lean into the corner and slide out. This works on the Motorbike because the sides of the tire are essentially contact patch. For mountain bikes since the contact patch is so small you need to shift your weight towards the outside. Easiest way to describe is as Andrew mentioned outside pedal pointing down, weight on that pedal and your body ends up straight up and down while the bike is leaned over.

If you want to learn quite, find somewhere that has lift access DH, you'll get the concept quick. (it's also great to improve your technical skills, booking it over roots and rocks down the side of a skihill.)
 

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Everything they said above, plus the following:

1. Slow down sufficiently prior to the corner, so you don't have to brake. That way all your tire friction is helping you stay in the turn, and not commited to braking. Braking during the turn kinda screws me up when the turns are loose.
2. Once through the apex, accelerate hard out of the turn. At this point the front wheel should be easier to control, and the driving rear wheel should be providing more control as well.
 
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