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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bit of an unusual request here...

I'm a partner in the architecture firm that designed the Ocoee Whitewater Center. The only good (excellent) photos we have of the building were done by a pro photographer several years ago. We purchased the images from him, but they have all kinds of usage restrictions. We've been more than a little frustrated with this arrangement.

So, we're in need of some great pictures of the center for use on our web site and in printed form. Does anyone have any high quality images they'd care to share? We'd certainly give the photographer(s) credit. We'd also consider compensation for the images if they're pro level, so long as future use is unrestricted.

I'm headed over to shoot some myself soon, but it's an hour drive and all I can do is guess about the weather, hazy skies, etc. I hate to burn up the gas (potentially multiple times) if anyone has images they'd be willing to share.

Thanks!
 

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I'll be down that way on August 9 for a white water rafting trip. If you can wait that long, I can bring the camera and take pics then.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
????? said:
I'm going into 4th year. When did you graduate?
Graduated in '93. I actually did the Whitewater Center as my thesis project & was then fortunate enough to go do the "real thing" & get it built. It was a dream come true.

Tell Jack Williams hello for me (Trey Wheeler).
 

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Forget architecture...the money is on the GC side and you can then yell at the architeect for not giving you constructable CD's!

j/k

Mostly ;) I've been fortunate enough to work with good architects with one exception and I won't name names but it was the low bidder on a state of GA job.

Oh and GO VOLS!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
k2biker said:
Forget architecture...the money is on the GC side and you can then yell at the architeect for not giving you constructable CD's!
Shoot - there's no question the money is on "the dark side". I figured that one out years ago! :madman:

We do know how to spell better than you contractor types though. :D

But architects generally don't make mistakes - our CDs are pretty much always perfect. You just haven't read an important book - it's called "The Architect's Book of Intent". We make it a part of the contract documents for all of our projects... ;) (Engineers are another story altogether though.)
 

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k2biker said:
Forget architecture...the money is on the GC side and you can then yell at the architeect for not giving you constructable CD's!

j/k

Mostly ;) I've been fortunate enough to work with good architects with one exception and I won't name names but it was the low bidder on a state of GA job.

Oh and GO VOLS!
Or do both. Architecture is just the one that requires going to college for.

Most contractors can't build and their subs aren't too smart. On the other hand, most architects don't have any building experience so they don't know how to draw up plans that actually work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, we're getting close to derailing this thread altogether (my fault too). But, while we're on the subject...

????? said:
Or do both. Architecture is just the one that requires going to college for.

Most contractors can't build and their subs aren't too smart. On the other hand, most architects don't have any building experience so they don't know how to draw up plans that actually work.
Okay, I can't tell if your post is TIC or not. But, assuming it's not, in all seriousness, don't graduate from school and approach your career with that attitude. The "old school" idea of contractors, architects, engineers, etc. having an adversarial relationship is stupid. It won't serve you or the profession well.

I'd suggest you approach each job as a team. You need to be asking yourself what you can learn from each and every general & sub contractor. Most of them (at least the ones that have been around for a while) are particularly smart (whether or not they went to college) and know a great deal about what they're doing.
 

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Yoooleeeaaaaahna Victoria
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Greets,

I must says I believe the way of thinking in the USA is a bit limiting; that is, the various areas of expertise are too disjointed. In my land, architects are educated in the aspects of construction as well as design.

BTW, is Auburn not the home to the Rural Studio and the most innovative use of materials? For me, the late Samuel Mockbee is quite the hero!

Julianna
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Julianna said:
Greets,

I must says I believe the way of thinking in the USA is a bit limiting; that is, the various areas of expertise are too disjointed. In my land, architects are educated in the aspects of construction as well as design.

BTW, is Auburn not the home to the Rural Studio and the most innovative use of materials? For me, the late Samuel Mockbee is quite the hero!

Julianna
Alas, you're quite correct. The days of the master builder are long since gone (not sure they ever existed in the US). Our culture is all about instant gratification - build it quick, build it cheap, but make it look bigger and better than what the neighbor has. It's a sad state. Students, particularly many of the generation now in school, generally aren't interested in taking the time to learn all that they should about the art of building. They just want to "get published", "get a job", etc. (Forgive the broad generalization, there are exceptions to every rule.)

But, yes, Auburn is the home of the Rural Studio. "*****" (as we called him) was one of my professors. He was an amazing man; I'm still saddened when I think of his untimely passing. He was a true genius.
 
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