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anti-corruption
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a question:
I'm looking to get into 29er's, but the cost is deterring. As single speed 29ers are much more affordable, they are the logical choice. Other than the fact that all of the trails around here have elevation gains in the thousands of feet for a trail that is between 1 and 3 miles long total (so most of the elevation is in the first .5-1 mile). A single speed in this case would only work for going downhill.
So what I am wondering is, why can't you just use the regular 32 or 36 tooth rear cog on the real, instead of the 20-22 that a lot of people use? I realize the front cog is smaller, which helps.
So my question is, why can't you have a singlespeed which is always in the lowest possible gear?

One more question:
Here you go up, then straight down. So you need the lowest gear, then the highest. If you have a chain tensioner on, can you use just two gears that are far apart, and manually shift (using your hands)?

Thanks
 

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Stayin' Puft
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Question one: you can.

Question two: yes, as long as the chain length required for the two combinations are roughly the same, so shift both front and rear simultaneously... You would probly do this standing next to the bike, not riding...if you want to do in riding, SS is not for you, get a derailler. ;-)

So my questions would be...
- Where do you live? People ride SS all over the world, your situation cannot be that unique. I ride on the Colorado front range, I can think of a few climbs I do regularly that are 1500' or so of climbing in less than 3 miles. I ride them in a 46" - 49" gear, and I am not particularly strong for a SS'er.
- Have you tried SS? Yes it takes a year or two for your body to adapt to the out-of-saddle, mashing riding style. You might never appreciate it if you are throwing a low spinning gear on and just calling it good. Don't miss out... ;-)
 

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anti-corruption
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks canyonrat

Not far from the Colorado front range.
http://www.ouraytrails.org/trails.html
Those are some of the trails I ride regularly. Specifically, Twin Peaks, Oak Creek, Corbett-Dallas Loop/Shortcut Corbett Canyon, Hayden and Weehawken.
On the Hayden Trail: "Round trip to the ridge is 4.4 miles with an altitude gain of 2,287 feet." That means 2287ft in 2.2 miles. (It is pretty much 2.2 straight up and then the same down).
On Oak Creek: "Round trip to the overlook is 6.2 miles with an altitude gain of 2,400 feet" So 2400ft in 3.1 miles.

I think I see what you mean. Would that mean I have to have two cranks and two cogs on the cassette? The bike I'm thinking about doing it on is probably a Haro Mary SS. Can I put two rear cogs on that bike?

This brings me to another question: can I gear a bike (like the Mary SS) that was built for SS?
 

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Stayin' Puft
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Nice...that is some stuff man, nice...

So... I was thinking 2 cogs and 2 chainrings, with a roughly equal tooth gap in front and rear. I am not a big tensioner guy...so I have no idea how much you can compensate for with a conventional tensioner. Also I am not familiar with the hub on the Haro, looks like it is a "cassette", but can you fit on 2 cogs? If it is a standard 135 MTB rear hub width, you could slap a wheel in there that holds multiple cogs. Thing is...what are the higher geared cogs for? If you are going straight up, and straight down, you will never pedal on the way down.

As far as putting gears on, it looks like you have no derailler hanger, so you are looking at internal geared hubs if anything, which are ok but a little pricey, heavy, and unusual for maintenance. So maybe just gear the SS low, or buy a derailler bike if you are looking for flexibility. Try a 32x22 on the SS, you never know, you might adapt and that is the lowest I typically hear of for a 29er, although I did meet one guy running 32x25 on a 26'er which is way low. (both these were larger number in the front.)
 

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Birthday Collector
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ridata, I got a Raliegh XXIX and ride it SS - but you can get the RD hanger for the XXIX+G and put a rear derailleur on it and built a wheel with a 9-spd hub. I did that for the Telluride-Moab hut trip last year and it worked great. Went back to SS after I got home, but the gearing was great for altitude (I live near sea-level) and long climbs with gear. If you want to do a "dingle", get a regular crank with a 22t and a 32t on the front, and put a 26t and 16t cogs on the back. Both of these should be easy to find. That gives you two combinations totalling 48t each, which should allow you to switch the chain from the 22f/26r to the 32f/16r at the top. Most SS hubs have room for 2 (or more) cogs. Sounds like a fun project. FWIW, I am not a fast climber - strong, but not a natural climber by any means... I get up most everything I come across with a 33f/20r. Sometimes it hurts, sometimes I have to stop on a long one, but I can usually ride all of it. Exrended sections of more than 12 - 14% though - that's pretty nasty! Think how strong you'd be if you could make that with a 32 x 22 or something!
 

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ridata said:
I have a question:
I'm looking to get into 29er's, but the cost is deterring. As single speed 29ers are much more affordable, they are the logical choice. Other than the fact that all of the trails around here have elevation gains in the thousands of feet for a trail that is between 1 and 3 miles long total (so most of the elevation is in the first .5-1 mile). A single speed in this case would only work for going downhill.
So what I am wondering is, why can't you just use the regular 32 or 36 tooth rear cog on the real, instead of the 20-22 that a lot of people use? I realize the front cog is smaller, which helps.
So my question is, why can't you have a singlespeed which is always in the lowest possible gear?

One more question:
Here you go up, then straight down. So you need the lowest gear, then the highest. If you have a chain tensioner on, can you use just two gears that are far apart, and manually shift (using your hands)?

Thanks
So..being relatively slow and sadistic is your goal? do you like licking cheese graters? you have come to the right place!
 

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anti-corruption
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
@canyonrat
Thanks for your help.
The higher gears are for the times when when I want to go fast not on the trails, and don't want to use my roadie. Going over Red Mountain Pass is one of those places; there are too many rocks, holes and corners in the road for me to think the roadie is always the best bike for it.
@ATBScott
Thanks for the info, you seem to know what you're talking about. :)
So in order for the chain to be kept the same length, you need the same number of teeth total for each combination? How many teeth difference can you have and not have it a problem with a tensioner?
@Nat
Thanks. The d460 looks like a decent bike. Looks comparable to the Mary SS. Of course, there aren't many components to compare to. :p I think I'd lean towards a Haro steel frame versus a Redline steel frame, soley because of what I've heard about their frames has been good. I haven't taken the time to throughly educate myself on Redline's stuff. What do you know about Redline? I can get a Mary SS right now for $550, so I'm still considering. It isn't so much the range between 1 and 9 that I want, but a full on-off(fast or slow and steep) setup.
oldsalty said:
So..being relatively slow and sadistic is your goal? do you like licking cheese graters? you have come to the right place!
There isn't much choice but going slow around here. :D I prefer kool-aid to cheese graters, which is why I came to this forum. ;)
 

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Birthday Collector
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The Redline is nice, sturdy frame - a bit stiff, but if you are a larger person, it may be a better choice than the Mary. The Mary may be a bit more comfortable and if you aren't large/heavy should be stiff enough. I thought it flexed when I rode one, but I was over 200 when I was shopping SS'ers. Now I'm 180 or so, and may not be as much a problem, but I am stronger now.

As far as teeth count - basically as long as the total of both sprocket combinations is the same, it should be OK. If you get to extremes, I have heard there can be some issues, but in the middle ranges it should be fine. A friend of mine is talking about dingling a 36-16 and a 32-20, for example, on his 26'er. Both total to 52 teeth, should be good.
 

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anti-corruption
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Nat said:
Redline makes a 1x9 29er that's dirt cheap. I saw one at my LBS for $549.
Nat, what is the name of the LBS that you saw it in? Do they ship? Per yours and the other comments in the singlespeed forum, the D460 is looking like a better option.
Thanks
 
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